Butte County, California

Last updated

Butte County, California
County of Butte
Butte County, CA.jpg
Butte County in 2005, with a view of the Sutter Buttes in the background
Seal of Butte County, California.png
Nickname(s): 
"The Land of Natural Wealth and Beauty"
Butte County, California
Interactive map of Butte County
Map of California highlighting Butte County.svg
Location in the state of California
Country United States
State California
Incorporated February 18, 1850 [1]
Named for The nearby Sutter Buttes
County seat Oroville
Largest city Chico (population and area)
Government
  Type Council–CAO
  Chair [2] Bill Connelly
  Vice Chair [3] Tod Kimmelshue
  Board of Supervisors [4]
Supervisors
  • Bill Connelly
  • Debra Lucero
  • Tami Ritter
  • Tod Kimmelshue
  • Doug Teeter
  Chief Administrative OfficerAndy Pickett
Area
  Total1,677 sq mi (4,340 km2)
  Land1,636 sq mi (4,240 km2)
  Water41 sq mi (110 km2)
Highest elevation
[5]
7,124 ft (2,171 m)
Population
 (2020) [6]
  Total211,632
  Density130/sq mi (49/km2)
Time zone UTC−8 (Pacific Time Zone)
  Summer (DST) UTC−7 (Pacific Daylight Time)
Area code 530
FIPS code06-007
GNIS feature ID 1675842
Website www.buttecounty.net

Butte County ( /ˈbjt/ ( Loudspeaker.svg listen )) is a county located in the northern part of the U.S. state of California. In the 2020 census, its population was 211,632. [6] [7] The county seat is Oroville. [8]

Contents

Butte County comprises the Chico, CA metropolitan statistical area. It is in the California Central Valley, north of the state capital of Sacramento.

Butte County is drained by the Feather River and the Sacramento River. Butte Creek and Big Chico Creek are additional perennial streams, both tributary to the Sacramento. The county is home to California State University, Chico and Butte College.

History

Butte County is named for the Sutter Buttes in neighboring Sutter County; butte means "small knoll" or "small hill" in French. [9] Butte County was incorporated as one of California's 19 original counties on February 18, 1850. The county went across the present limits of the Tehama, Plumas, Colusa, and Sutter Counties. [10]

Between November 8 and 25, 2018, a major wildfire, the Camp Fire, destroyed most of the town of Paradise, the adjacent community of Concow, and a large area of rural, hilly country east of Chico. More than 80 people were killed, 50,000 were displaced, over 150,000 acres were burned, and nearly 20,000 buildings were destroyed. [11] [12] The Camp Fire was California's most destructive and deadliest fire. [13]

Geography

South Table Mountain Near Oroville South Table Mountain Butte County.jpg
South Table Mountain Near Oroville

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,677 square miles (4,340 km2), of which 41 square miles (110 km2) (2.4%) are covered by water. [6]

The county is drained by the Feather River and Butte Creek. Part of the county's western border is formed by the Sacramento River. The county lies along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, the steep slopes making it prime territory for the siting of hydroelectric power plants. About a half dozen of these plants are located in the county, one of which, serves the Oroville Dam, which became severely stressed by overflow water in 2017, and which remains a concern today.

National protected areas

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1850 3,574
1860 12,106238.7%
1870 11,403−5.8%
1880 18,72164.2%
1890 17,939−4.2%
1900 17,117−4.6%
1910 27,30159.5%
1920 30,03010.0%
1930 34,09313.5%
1940 42,84025.7%
1950 64,93051.6%
1960 82,03026.3%
1970 101,96924.3%
1980 143,85141.1%
1990 182,12026.6%
2000 203,17111.6%
2010 220,0008.3%
2020 211,632−3.8%
U.S. Decennial Census [14]
1790–1960 [15] 1900–1990 [16]
1990–2000 [17] 2010 [18] 2020 [19]

2020 census

Butte County, California - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / EthnicityPop 2010 [18] Pop 2020 [19] % 2010% 2020
White alone (NH)165,416139,65175.19%65.99%
Black or African American alone (NH)3,1333,3201.42%1.57%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH)3,3953,0501.54%1.44%
Asian alone (NH)8,92110,3334.06%4.88%
Pacific Islander alone (NH)4015080.18%0.24%
Some other race alone (NH)3181,1840.14%0.56%
Mixed/multiracial (NH)7,30013,4743.32%6.37%
Hispanic or Latino (any race)31,11640,11214.14%18.95%
Total220,000211,632100.00%100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010 Census

The 2010 United States Census reported that Butte County had a population of 220,000. The racial makeup of Butte County was 180,096 (81.9%) White, 3,415 (1.6%) African American, 4,395 (2.0%) Native American, 9,057 (4.1%) Asian, 452 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 12,141 (5.5%) from other races, and 10,444 (4.7%) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 31,116 persons (14.1%). [28]

2000

As of the census [29] of 2000, there were 203,171 people, 79,566 households, and 49,410 families residing in the county. The population density was 124 people per square mile (48/km2). There were 85,523 housing units at an average density of 52 per square mile (20/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.5% White, 10.5% of the population were Hispanic or Latino, 3.3% Asian, 1.9% Native American, 1.4% Black or African American, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 4.8% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. 87.9% spoke English, 7.8% Spanish and 1.4% Hmong as their first language.

There were 79,566 households, out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.9% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.0% under the age of 18, 13.6% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,924, and the median income for a family was $41,010. Males had a median income of $34,137 versus $25,393 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,517. About 12.2% of families and 19.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.8% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

Health and Crime

There are four major hospitals and the State of California defines Butte County as being inside Health Service Area 1. A special district, the Butte County Air Quality Management District, regulates airborne pollutant emissions in the county. It does this following regional regulations, state, and federal laws. For example, in recent years, the agency changed rules that once allowed residents to burn household trash outdoors.


The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates

Government

Law enforcement

Butte County Sheriff's Office
Patch of the Butte County Sheriff's Department.jpg
AbbreviationBCSO
Operational structure
Headquarters Oroville, California
Sheriff responsible
  • Kory Honea
Facilities
Jails1
Website
Official website

The Butte County Sheriff's Office provides general-service law enforcement to unincorporated areas of Butte County, serving as the equivalent of the county police for unincorporated areas of the county as well as incorporated cities within the county who have contracted with the agency for law-enforcement services (known as "contract cities" in local jargon). It also holds primary jurisdiction over facilities operated by Butte County, such as local parks, marinas and government buildings; provides marshal service for the Superior Court of Butte County; operates the county jail system; and provides services such as laboratories and academy training to smaller law enforcement agencies within the county. The first sheriff of Butte County was Joseph Q. Wilbur. Kory Honea has been the sheriff since 2014. [32]

Voter registration statistics

Cities by population and voter registration

Local

The citizens of the county of Butte are represented by the five member Butte County Board of Supervisors.

Tribal

The Berry Creek Rancheria of Tyme Maidu Indians of California is headquartered in Oroville. The Berry Creek Rancheria operates Gold Country Casino.

The Mooretown Rancheria of Maidu Indians of California is also headquartered in Oroville. The Mooretown Rancheria operates Feather Falls Casino.

The governmental headquarters of the Mechoopda Indian Tribe of Chico Rancheria is located in Chico.

State

Butte County is split between the 1st and 3rd Assembly districts, represented by Republican Megan Dahle and Republican James Gallagher, respectively. [34] The county is in the 4th Senate District , represented by Democrat Marie Alvarado-Gil. [35]

According to the California Secretary of State, as of February 10, 2019, Butte County has 172,054 registered voters. Of those, 42,093 (34.4%) are registered Democrats, 41,330 (33.8%) are registered Republicans and 30,377 (24.8%) have declined to state a political party. [36]

On November 4, 2008, Butte County voted 56.7% for Proposition 8 which amended the California Constitution to ban same-sex marriages. [37]

Federal

Butte County is in California's 1st congressional district , represented by Republican Doug LaMalfa. [38]

Butte is a bellwether county in presidential elections, and one of only thirteen to have voted for Obama in 2008, Romney in 2012, Trump in 2016, and Biden in 2020. [lower-alpha 1]

United States presidential election results for Butte County, California [39]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.%No.%No.%
2020 48,81947.60%50,81549.54%2,9312.86%
2016 45,14446.54%41,56742.85%10,29110.61%
2012 44,47948.87%42,66946.88%3,8734.26%
2008 46,70647.32%49,01349.66%2,9883.03%
2004 51,66253.73%42,44844.14%2,0472.13%
2000 45,58454.45%31,33837.43%6,7998.12%
1996 38,96148.98%30,65138.53%9,93812.49%
1992 31,60837.18%32,48938.22%20,91724.60%
1988 40,14356.04%30,40642.45%1,0821.51%
1984 45,38163.06%25,42135.32%1,1621.61%
1980 38,18857.85%19,52029.57%8,30412.58%
1976 28,40051.77%24,20344.12%2,2514.10%
1972 28,81957.61%18,40136.78%2,8085.61%
1968 22,22556.68%12,88732.87%4,09910.45%
1964 19,57448.43%20,83151.54%140.03%
1960 20,83857.60%15,16341.92%1740.48%
1956 18,38258.43%12,93341.11%1470.47%
1952 19,24863.27%10,91335.87%2630.86%
1948 10,94849.36%10,13345.68%1,1004.96%
1944 7,85246.83%8,81152.55%1050.63%
1940 7,43340.46%10,68458.15%2551.39%
1936 5,10332.04%10,49065.86%3352.10%
1932 4,32229.14%9,64565.03%8655.83%
1928 6,30660.45%3,94637.83%1801.73%
1924 4,38242.25%1,29912.52%4,69145.23%
1920 5,40965.69%2,26227.47%5636.84%
1916 3,95640.91%4,88850.55%8258.53%
1912 100.11%4,02845.66%4,78454.23%
1908 3,09452.74%2,14636.58%62610.67%
1904 2,79958.84%1,57433.09%3848.07%
1900 2,32252.55%2,01145.51%861.95%
1896 2,07548.31%2,12049.36%1002.33%
1892 2,18046.73%2,14145.89%3447.37%
1888 2,19148.25%2,21548.78%1352.97%
1884 2,17249.06%2,11847.84%1373.09%
1880 1,81449.75%1,83250.25%00.00%

Education

California State University, Chico was founded in 1887. Kendall Hall as seen from Laxson Auditorium-01006.jpg
California State University, Chico was founded in 1887.

Public schools

There are roughly 90 public schools in the county according to the National Center for Educational Statistics. The schools are operated by the County Office of Education and 15 school districts, which are:

Colleges and universities

Public libraries

Butte County Library provides library services to residents of the County through six branches in Biggs, Chico, Durham, Gridley, Oroville and Paradise. The mission of the Butte County Library is to provide all individuals, regardless of age, ethnic background, educational or economic level, with free access to ideas, information, and technology.

For many years, the library served rural and mountain communities through regularly scheduled bookmobile visits; however, due to budget cuts, this service was discontinued in 2009 and the bookmobile was sold. The library serves low-literacy adults through several programs of the Butte County Library Literacy Services division, including the Adult Reading Program, Families for Literacy and the Literacy Coach, a 36-foot (11 m) vehicle that provides mobile programming like story times, parent meetings, workshops, and computer and teacher trainings.

The library operates as a department of the County of Butte, governed by the Butte County Board of Supervisors.

Transportation

Butte County is home to Bidwell Park in Chico, one of the largest municipal parks in the United States. Bidwell Park Chico.jpg
Butte County is home to Bidwell Park in Chico, one of the largest municipal parks in the United States.

Major highways

Public transportation

Butte Regional Transit or the B-Line, provides service in and between Chico, Oroville, Paradise, Gridley and Biggs. Chico is also a connection point for Glenn Ride buses to Glenn County and Plumas Transit Systems buses to Plumas County.

Greyhound buses stop in Chico.

Amtrak's Coast Starlight (Los Angeles-Seattle) passenger train makes a stop daily in each direction in Chico's Chico station.

Airports

General Aviation airports in Butte County include:

Communities

A photo of Bidwell Mansion in Chico. Bidwell Mansion 2006 11 IMGP0863.JPG
A photo of Bidwell Mansion in Chico.
Kendall Hall, the administration building at California State University, Chico in Chico Chico State's Kendall Hall.JPG
Kendall Hall, the administration building at California State University, Chico in Chico

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Butte County. [41]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Municipal typePopulation (2010 Census)
1 Chico City86,187
2 Paradise Town26,218
3 Oroville City15,546
4 Magalia CDP11,310
5 Oroville East CDP8,280
6 Thermalito CDP6,646
7 Gridley City6,584
8 South Oroville CDP5,742
9 Durham CDP5,518
10 Palermo CDP5,382
11 Kelly Ridge CDP2,544
12 Biggs City1,707
13 Berry Creek CDP1,424
14 Forest Ranch CDP1,184
15 Butte Creek Canyon CDP1,086
16 Butte Valley CDP899
17 Cohasset CDP847
18 Concow CDP710
19 Bangor CDP646
20 Honcut CDP370
21 Yankee Hill CDP333
t-22 Forbestown CDP320
t-22 Nord CDP320
23 Stirling City CDP295
24 Richvale CDP244
25 Rackerby CDP204
26 Berry Creek Rancheria AIAN 152
27 Clipper Mills CDP142
28 Robinson Mill CDP80
29 Cherokee CDP69
30 Butte Meadows CDP40
31 Enterprise Rancheria [42] AIAN1

Several movies have been filmed in Butte County, including Gone with the Wind , [43] The Outlaw Josey Wales , [44] Friendly Persuasion , [45] Magic Town , [46] The Klansman , [45] Ruby Ridge: An American Tragedy , [45] The Adventures of Robin Hood , [45] and Under Wraps . [45] The most recent season of the television series Sons of Anarchy features an episode in which the sons come into contact with corrupt police in the fictional town of Eden, located in Butte County. [47]

See also


Notes

Notes
References
  1. Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  2. Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  3. Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  4. 1 2 Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sacramento County, California</span> County in California, United States

Sacramento County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 1,585,055. Its county seat is Sacramento, which has been the state capital of California since 1854.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yolo County, California</span> County in California, United States

Yolo County, officially the County of Yolo, is a county located in the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 216,403. Its county seat is Woodland.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Amador County, California</span> County in California, United States

Amador County is a county located in the U.S. state of California, in the Sierra Nevada. As of the 2020 census, the population was 40,474. The county seat is Jackson. Amador County, located within California's Gold Country, is known as "The Heart of the Mother Lode". There is a substantial viticultural industry in the county.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Colusa County, California</span> County in California, United States

Colusa County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 21,839. The county seat is Colusa. It is in the North Valley of California, northwest of the state capital, Sacramento.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Glenn County, California</span> County in California, United States

Glenn County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 28,917. The county seat is Willows. It is located in the Sacramento Valley, in the northern part of the California Central Valley. The Grindstone Rancheria, reservation of the Grindstone Indian Rancheria of Wintun-Wailaki Indians, is located in Glenn County.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Mendocino County, California</span> County in California, United States

Mendocino County is a county located on the North Coast of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 91,601. The county seat is Ukiah.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Placer County, California</span> County in California, United States

Placer County, officially the County of Placer, is a county in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 404,739. The county seat is Auburn.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Plumas County, California</span> County in California, United States

Plumas County is a county in the Sierra Nevada of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 19,790. The county seat is Quincy, and the only incorporated city is Portola. The largest community in the county is East Quincy. The county was named for the Spanish Río de las Plumas, which flows through it. The county itself is also the namesake of a native moth species, Hadena plumasata.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shasta County, California</span> County in California, United States

Shasta County, officially the County of Shasta, is a county in the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. Its population is 182,155 as of the 2020 census, up from 177,223 from the 2010 census. The county seat is Redding.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sierra County, California</span> County in California, United States

Sierra County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 3,236, making it California's second-least populous county. The county seat is Downieville; the sole incorporated city is Loyalton. The county is in the Sierra Nevada, northeast of Sacramento on the border with Nevada.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Siskiyou County, California</span> County in California, United States

Siskiyou County is a county in the northernmost part of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 44,076. Its county seat is Yreka and its highest point is Mount Shasta. It falls within the Cascadia bioregion.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sutter County, California</span> County in California, United States

Sutter County is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 99,633. The county seat is Yuba City. Sutter County is included in the Yuba City, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Sacramento-Roseville, CA Combined Statistical Area. The county is located along the Sacramento River in the Sacramento Valley.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tehama County, California</span> County in California, United States

Tehama County is a county located in the northern part of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 65,829. The county seat and largest city is Red Bluff.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tuolumne County, California</span> County in California, United States

Tuolumne County, officially the County of Tuolumne, is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 census, the population was 55,620. The county seat and only incorporated city is Sonora.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yuba County, California</span> County in California, United States

Yuba County is a county in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2020 U.S. Census, the population was 81,575. The county seat is Marysville. Yuba County is included in the Yuba City, California Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Sacramento–Roseville, California Combined Statistical Area. The county is in the Central Valley region along the Feather River.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gridley, California</span> City in the state of California, United States

Gridley is a city in Butte County, California, United States, 29 miles south of Chico, California and 56 miles north of Sacramento, California. The 2019 State of California population estimate was 7,224. California State Route 99 runs through Gridley and Interstate 5 and California State Route 70 are both nearby. The highway CA 99 goes through Gridley and the current population is 9,082 [found in a recent census].

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Oroville, California</span> City in California, United States

Oroville is the county seat of Butte County, California, United States. The population of the city was 15,506 at the 2010 census, up from 13,004 in the 2000 census. Following the 2018 Camp Fire that destroyed much of the town of Paradise, the population of Oroville increased as many people who lost their homes relocated to nearby Oroville. In 2020, the 2020 census recorded the population of Oroville at 20,042.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Feather River</span> River in California, United States

The Feather River is the principal tributary of the Sacramento River, in the Sacramento Valley of Northern California. The river's main stem is about 73 miles (117 km) long. Its length to its most distant headwater tributary is just over 210 miles (340 km). The main stem Feather River begins in Lake Oroville, where its four long tributary forks join—the South Fork, Middle Fork, North Fork, and West Branch Feather Rivers. These and other tributaries drain part of the northern Sierra Nevada, and the extreme southern Cascades, as well as a small portion of the Sacramento Valley. The total drainage basin is about 6,200 square miles (16,000 km2), with approximately 3,604 square miles (9,330 km2) above Lake Oroville.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">California State Route 70</span> Highway in California

State Route 70 is a state highway in the U.S. state of California, connecting SR 99 north of Sacramento with U.S. Route 395 near Beckwourth Pass via the Feather River Canyon. Through the Feather River Canyon, from SR 149 to US 395, SR 70 is the Feather River Scenic Byway, a Forest Service Byway that parallels the ex-Western Pacific Railroad's Feather River Route.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Area code 530</span> Area code for parts of northern California

Area code 530 is a California telephone area code in northeastern and Northern California.

References

  1. Statistical Report of the California State Board of Agriculture for the Year 1918. Sacramento, CA: California State Printing Office. 1919. p. 316. Retrieved May 14, 2012.
  2. "Supervisor Bill Connelly".
  3. "District 4 Supervisor".
  4. "Board of Supervisors > Home".
  5. "Butte County High Point". Peakbagger.com. Archived from the original on May 2, 2015. Retrieved February 11, 2015.
  6. 1 2 3 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau.
  7. "Butte County, California". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  8. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  9. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States (PDF). United States Geological Survey. p. 62. Retrieved December 29, 2019.
  10. George C. Mansfield, History of Butte County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present, Hathitrust.org, 1918
  11. "Death toll jumps to 23 as 'challenging' Camp Fire pushes toward Lake Oroville". The Sacramento Bee . November 10, 2018. Archived from the original on November 11, 2018.
  12. "California wildfires: Death toll rises to 25". BBC . November 11, 2018. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  13. Gina Martinez (November 14, 2018). "The California Fire That Killed 48 People Is the Deadliest U.S. Wildfire in a Century". Time . Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  14. "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau . Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  15. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  16. Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  17. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved September 24, 2015.
  18. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Butte County, California". United States Census Bureau .
  19. 1 2 "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Butte County, California". United States Census Bureau .
  20. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  21. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  22. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  23. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  24. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  25. 1 2 U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  26. U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. U.S. Census website . Retrieved October 21, 2013.
  27. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Data unavailable
  28. "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau.
  29. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  30. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009 Archived December 2, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  31. 1 2 3 United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California) Archived June 28, 2016, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved November 14, 2013.
  32. "History". Butte County. Retrieved November 8, 2022.
  33. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 – Report of Registration Archived November 3, 2013, at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved October 31, 2013.
  34. "Members Assembly". State of California. Archived from the original on April 24, 2013. Retrieved March 19, 2013.
  35. "Senators". State of California. Archived from the original on April 24, 2013. Retrieved March 19, 2013.
  36. CA Secretary of State – Report of Registration – February 10, 2019
  37. https://elections.cdn.sos.ca.gov/sov/2008-general/ssov/10-ballot-measures-statewide-summary-by-county.pdf [ bare URL PDF ]
  38. "California's 1st Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved February 28, 2013.
  39. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  40. Colby, Robert; McDonald, Lois (2005). Magalia to Stirling City. Arcadia. p. 66. ISBN   9780738530185.
  41. "2010 U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 25, 2015.
  42. Staff, Website Services & Coordination. "US Census Bureau 2010 Census Interactive Population Map". www.census.gov. Archived from the original on April 30, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  43. "Where was Gone with the Wind filmed?". giggster.com. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  44. "195 ACRE RANCH RICH WITH HISTORY". Land.com. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  45. 1 2 3 4 5 "CN&R • Arts&Culture • Fine Arts • Magic Town • Jun 14, 2001". Chico News & Review. July 6, 2005. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  46. "CN&R • Arts&Culture • Fine Arts • Magic Town • Jun 14, 2001". Chico News & Review. July 6, 2005. Retrieved November 22, 2022.
  47. M; October 16, i Bierly Updated; EDT, 2013 at 06:05 AM. "Sons of Anarchy recap: Son Summit". EW.com. Retrieved November 22, 2022.

Coordinates: 39°40′N121°36′W / 39.66°N 121.60°W / 39.66; -121.60