Byakuren Kaikan

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Byakuren Kaikan
Byakuren Kaikan Japanese calligrphy.jpg
Focus Hybrid
Hardness Full-contact
Country of origin Flag of Japan.svg Japan
CreatorSugihara Masayasu
Famous practitionersTakehiro Minami, Takatugu Naito, Shoto Yamaguchi, Masato Fukuchi, Yuto Fukuchi, Chisato Yamaguchi, Yuyu Kitajima, Reza Goodary, Pouya Salehi Chakousari, Akbar Abbasi, Asghar Jabari, Mehrdad Ramezani, Judd Reid
Parenthood Shorinji Kempo

The Byakuren Kaikan (Japanese: 白蓮会館 - literally translated: "White Lotus Association") or Byakuren Karate is a full contact karate style founded in 1984 by Sugihara Masayasu (Japanese: 杉原 正康). [1]

Contents

The Byakuren Kaikan is a member of the Japan Fullcontact Karate Organization (JFKO) [2] [3] [4]

The Byakuren Kaikan is registered in Japan as a nonprofit organization (NPO). [5] [6]

History

Despite being classified as a Karate school its origins date actually back to the Shorinji Kempo, a martial art considered to be derived from Shaolin Kung Fu. Henceforth, Byakuren Kaikan, much like its parent, divides the techniques into two main categories: Gōhō (剛法 - i.e. "hard techniques": punches, kicks, etc.) and Jūhō (柔法 - "soft techniques": throws, joint locks, etc.). [7]

Sugihara Masayasu (Born in Osaka, Japan, In 1951) started practicing Judo and Karate from a very young age, and eventually discovered and trained mainly under Shorinji Kempo. By the age of 28, Sugihara held a 6th Dan rank in the art, and he was a bodyguard and close student of the founder of Shorinji Kenpo Dōshin Sō. [8] This martial art did not allow its followers to take part in contact competitions but Sugihara, eager to test his fighting skills against real opponents, decided to enroll anyway in a Karate contest. In 1983 he joined a national tournament organized by the Seidō Kaikan using "Byakuren Kaikan" as pseudonym for his school. Although he ended up among the winners the truth was soon to be discovered and to avoid further trouble to the Shorinji Kenpo organization he decided in 1984 to establish his own style which he called "International Karate-Kempo Federation Byakuren". [9]

There are three reasons why the name was chosen: the bodyguard corps which he belonged to in Shorinji Kempo was called "Byakuren"(White Lotus), it was also the name of a technique of the martial art; furthermore, since he was about to undertake a new path in Karate, he would have had to start from the very beginning using the white belt.

Despite the rather acrimonious split from the Shorinji Kempo organization, Sugihara expressed great gratitude for his previous master. [10] [11]

Unlike many other schools of the time, since its foundation the members of Byakuren began to participate in many competitions organized by other styles, becoming a new contender on the scene. [12] [13] In the full contact karate environment Sugihara will earn the title of "Fighting Master" and "invader".

Headquarters in Osaka Byakuren Karate.jpg
Headquarters in Osaka

Since 1985 the Byakuren Kaikan regularly organizes regional and national Full Contact Karate tournaments. [14] [15]

In 2004, on the 20th anniversary of the foundation, the Byakuren Kaikan organized its first world Karate tournament in Osaka. [16]

Currently the style is present with schools all over Japan and in the following countries: Russia, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy, India, Sri Lanka, Canada, USA, New Zealand, Korea, Hong Kong.United Arab Emirates (UAE) [17]

Techniques and Training

Practice in Byakuren Karate can be divided into four main categories: [18]

Gōhō (剛法): i.e. "hard techniques". These include punches, kicks, knee and elbow strikes. Students are also taught how to dodge, block, counterattack and in a final phase how to anticipate the intentions of the opponent.

Jūhō (柔法): the "soft techniques" are mostly focused on self-defense. [19] They include throws, pins, joint locks and submission techniques.

Muscle strengthening and physical training: Byakuren Karate in strongly aimed at competition matches, therefore the curriculum includes many exercises to improve endurance, speed and power.

Tameshiwari (試割り): for artistic and demonstration purposes at the highest levels breaking techniques are also imparted.

Byakuren Karate employs the principles of Sabaki (体さばき) for dodging and counterattack the opponent. [20] The fighting pose is relaxed and natural.

Since competition rules include winning by K.O. great emphasis is placed on Kumite (組手 - fighting with a real opponent) which is integral part of the training since the lower grades. [21]

The employment of Kata (型) is more limited compared to more traditional Karate styles. There is a number of customized katas mainly performed during tests for upgrading to the next belt. [8]

The rules for competition are those of the traditional Japanese Full Contact Karate as established by the Kyokushin Kaikan: [22] upper limb strikes are prohibited to neck and face, attacks with the lower limbs can also be thrown to the head instead; it is forbidden to pull or grab the opponent, hitting the genitals or the knees directly from the front.

In training and matches protectors are worn on legs, knees, hands and genitals. No protectors are employed in competitions among black belts.

Philosophy

Despite being highly focused on competition, the Association values are based on humility, respect and altruism. Seriousness and dedication is required while training but also to be able to recognize one's own limits in order to avoid injuries.

The ultimate purpose of the dōjō is not to churn out absolute champions but must be a place of growth and aggregation. What is learned at the Byakuren Kaikan must be brought in one's everyday life in order to be helpful. [10]

Championships results

2008 World Cup (Pattaya, Thailand)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-75 kg Flag of Iran.svg Musa Bagheri Flag of Iran.svg Asghar Jabbari Flag of Iran.svg Mohammad Bahrami
Flag of Iran.svg Pouya Salehi Chakousari
+75 kg Flag of Iran.svg Amirhamzeh Fathi Flag of Australia (converted).svg Judd Reid Flag of Iran.svg Seyedghasam Hoseinpour
Flag of Russia.svg Rasim Sulovic

[23]

2009 International tournament (Osaka, Japan)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-65 kg Flag of Japan.svg Kitahama Seietsu Flag of Japan.svg Narita Tomomi Flag of Japan.svg Akamatsu Kota
Flag of Japan.svg Ikeda Shinobu
-75 kg Flag of Thailand.svg Sakmongkol Sithchuchok Flag of Japan.svg Kuwamoto Mamoru Flag of Brazil.svg Andra Alves
Flag of Japan.svg Miyazaki Seiya
+75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Kitajima Yuyu Flag of Portugal.svg Paulo Barros Flag of Australia (converted).svg Judd Reid
Flag of Japan.svg Arai Hayato

[24]

2010 International tournament (Pattaya, Thailand)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-75 kg Flag of Thailand.svg Sakmongkol Sithchuchok Flag of Japan.svg Takumi Kodaira Flag of Iran.svg Mohammad Bahrami
Flag of Japan.svg Oguchi Shingo
+75 kg Flag of Australia (converted).svg Judd Reid Flag of Iran.svg Amirhamzeh Fathi Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Chen Chunkang
Flag of Iran.svg Abouzar Taleghan Ghafari

[25]

2011 All Japan Championship (Osaka, Japan)

Men

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-65 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Kyosuke Yoshihama Flag of Japan.svg Rikiya Shoda
Flag of Japan.svg Kaneshiro Naoki
-75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Tatsuki Furukawa Flag of Japan.svg Masayuki Hara Flag of Japan.svg Seiya Miyazaki
Flag of Japan.svg Yumiya Chi Shingo
+75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Takatsugu Naito Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Hiroaki Kobayashi
Flag of Japan.svg Norihide Ichikawa

Women

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Chirei Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Ueda Miyako Flag of Japan.svg Yuri Yamazaki
Flag of Japan.svg Yui Horiuchi
+55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yoshimura Yoshi Flag of Japan.svg Kozue Sasaki Flag of Japan.svg Yukari Kishida
Flag of Japan.svg Maria Taniguchi

[26]

2012 World Cup (Osaka, Japan)

Men

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-65 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Yoshihama Kyosuke Flag of Iran.svg Pouya Salehi Chakousari
Flag of Japan.svg Tetsuya Yamada
-75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Tatsuki Furukawa Flag of Japan.svg Akita Flag of Iran.svg Akbar Abbasi
Flag of Iran.svg Mohammad Bahrami
+75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Takatsugu Naito Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Norihide Ichikawa
Flag of Iran.svg Abouzar Taleghan Ghafari

Women

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Chirei Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Risa Sudo Flag of Japan.svg Yuri Yamazaki
Flag of Japan.svg Mako Yamane
+55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Ohno Emina Flag of Japan.svg Chisaki Araki Flag of Japan.svg Yoshimura Yoshi
Flag of Japan.svg Kozue Sasaki

[27]

2013 All Japan Championship (Osaka, Japan)

Men

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-65 kg Flag of the United States.svg Blessed land Flag of Japan.svg Tatsuya Takenaka Flag of Japan.svg Takuya Nagashima
Flag of Japan.svg Akitaka Okazaki
-75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Yumiya Chi Shingo Flag of Japan.svg Seiya Miyazaki
Flag of Japan.svg Ryuji Kuramoto
+75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Yuyu Kitajima Flag of Japan.svg Takahiro Marutani
Flag of Japan.svg Takatsugu Naito

Women

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Chirei Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Yayoi Nishida Flag of Japan.svg Anna Abe
Flag of Japan.svg Yuri Yamazaki
+55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yoshimura Yoshi Flag of Japan.svg OkienFlag placeholder.svg
Flag placeholder.svg

[28]

2014 All Japan Championship (Osaka, Japan)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-70 kg Flag of Japan.svg Genki Kamei Flag of Japan.svg Yuuki Shimizu Flag of Japan.svg Yuya Konishi
Flag of Japan.svg Yuuki Yoza
-80 kg Flag of Russia.svg Igor Titkov Flag of Japan.svg Takehiro Kaga Flag of Russia.svg Andrei Luzin
Flag of Japan.svg Yuta Sawamura
-90 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yuta Takahashi Flag of Japan.svg Masanaga Nakamura Flag of Russia.svg Farukh Turgunboev
Flag of Japan.svg Takuya Takeoka
+90 kg Flag of Japan.svg Syohei Kamada Flag of Japan.svg Mikio Ueda Flag of Australia (converted).svg Steven Cujic
Flag of Japan.svg Satoru Araki

[29]

2014 All Japan Open Championship (Osaka, Japan)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
Open Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Takutsugu Naito Flag of Japan.svg Kitijima Yuyu
Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi

[30]

2015 All Japan (Osaka, Japan)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-70 kg Flag of Japan.svg Tatsuya Takenaka Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Okumura Flag of Japan.svg Daiki Arime
Flag of Japan.svg Daichi Tanazawa
-80 kg Flag of Japan.svg Tenta Onodera Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Shinjiro Ogawa
Flag of Japan.svg Kazumi Yamada
+80 kg Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Yuyu Kitajima Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Kameyama
Flag of Japan.svg Isao Yamashita

[31]

2016 International tournament (Pattaya, Thailand)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Tenta Onodera Flag of Japan.svg Masahito Hino Flag of Japan.svg Nobuhide Abe
Flag of Japan.svg Takumi Kodaira
+75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Takatsugu Naito Flag of Iran.svg Flag of the United States.svg Reza Goodary
Flag of Japan.svg Yuyu Kitajima

[32]

2016 World Cup (Osaka, Japan)

Men

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-70 kg Flag of Japan.svg Masato Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Yuma Kurooka Flag of Japan.svg Izumi Yamada
Flag of Japan.svg Tatsuya Takenaka
-80 kg Flag of Japan.svg Yuto Fukuchi Flag of Japan.svg Masayuki Hara Flag of Japan.svg Norihide Abe
Flag of Japan.svg Yuta Murakami
+80 kg Flag of Japan.svg Takatugu Naito Flag of Japan.svg Shota Yamaguchi Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Tada
Flag of Japan.svg Daisuke Kameyama

Women

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Konatu Nagashima Flag of Japan.svg Yumika Tamashiro Flag of Japan.svg Chisato Yamaguchi
Flag of Japan.svg Mahiro Abe
+55 kg Flag of Japan.svg Ayaka Kameyama Flag of Japan.svg Hitomi Katuda Flag of Japan.svg Saki Kuhara
Flag of Japan.svg Sumika Mawatari

[33]

2017 World Open Championship (Pattaya, Thailand)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
Open Flag of Iran.svg Mehrdad Ramezani Flag of Armenia.svg Hovhannes Sargsyan Flag of Japan.svg Rikiya Yamashita
Flag of Japan.svg Yuuhei Ashitaka

[34]

2017 Japan tournament (Okinawa, Japan)

WeightGoldSilverBronze
Open Flag of Iran.svg Flag of the United States.svg Reza Goodary Flag of Japan.svg Takashi Kanei Flag of Japan.svg Atsushi Kanda
Flag of Japan.svg Yuki Asato

2018 Japan tournament (Okinawa, Japan)

Men

WeightGoldSilverBronze
-65 kg Flag of Japan.svg Junichi Iikawa Flag of Japan.svg Tanaka Sage Flag of Japan.svg N/A
Flag of Japan.svg N/A
-75 kg Flag of Japan.svg Kanehisa Arime Flag of Japan.svg Daisei Sugawara Flag of Japan.svg N/A
Flag of Japan.svg N/A
+75 kg Flag of Iran.svg Flag of the United States.svg Reza Goodary Flag of Japan.svg Tawada Shindai Flag of Japan.svg N/A
Flag of Japan.svg N/A

Women

WeightGoldSilverBronze
Open Flag of Japan.svg Fukutoku Fruiting Flag of Japan.svg Gen Lu Ming Liang Hai Flag of Japan.svg N/A
Flag of Japan.svg N/A

[35]

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