Bydgoszcz Voivodeship

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Bydgoszcz Voivodeship (Polish: województwo bydgoskie) was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in the years 19751998, superseded by Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship.
Capital city: Bydgoszcz
Area:
Statistics (1 January 1992):
Population: inhabitants
Population density: inhabitants/km2
Administrative division: communes
Number of cities and towns (urban communes):

Major cities and towns (population 1995):

Bydgoszcz Voivodeship 1946–1975

Bydgoszcz Voivodeship 1946–1975 was a unit of administrative division and local government in Poland in the years 19461975. Initially called the Pomeranian Voivodeship, it was created from the southern part of the pre-war Pomeranian Voivodeship and superseded by the voivodeships of Bydgoszcz, Toruń and Włocławek.
Capital city: Bydgoszcz
Area: ?
Population: ?
Urban population: ?
Population density: ?

List of counties in 1946


English county name, Polish county name, capital city

New counties established 19461975:

Abolished counties:

Coordinates: 53°07′31″N18°00′28″E / 53.125218°N 18.007896°E / 53.125218; 18.007896


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