Byron Beams

Last updated
Byron Beams
No. 72, 78
Position: Offensive tackle/Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:(1935-09-08)September 8, 1935
Konawa, Oklahoma
Died:November 14, 1992(1992-11-14) (aged 63)
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:248 lb (112 kg)
Career information
High school: Ada (OK)
College: Notre Dame
NFL Draft: 1957  / Round: 20 / Pick: 232
(by the Los Angeles Rams) [1]
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:16
Player stats at NFL.com

Byron Donnell Beams (September 8, 1935 – November 14, 1992) was an American football defensive and offensive tackle who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). He played college football at Notre Dame. Beams was a 20th round selection (232nd overall pick) of the Los Angeles Rams in the 1957 NFL Draft. He played in the NFL for the Pittsburgh Steelers in 19591960 and in the AFL for the league champion Houston Oilers in 1961.

See also

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References

  1. "1957 Los Angeles Rams". databaseFootball.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2010. Retrieved July 17, 2020.CS1 maint: unfit url (link)