CECAFA Cup

Last updated
CECAFA Cup
Founded1926
Region CECAFA
Number of teams12
Current championsFlag of Kenya.svg  Kenya (7 titles)
Most successful team(s)Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda (14 titles)
Websitewww.cecafafootball.org
Soccerball current event.svg 2017 CECAFA Cup

The CECAFA Cup (now the CECAFA Tusker Challenge Cup), is the oldest football tournament in Africa. A FIFA competition, it includes national teams from the Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations (CECAFA).

Africa The second largest and second most-populous continent, mostly in the Northern and Eastern Hemispheres

Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent, being behind Asia in both categories. At about 30.3 million km2 including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its land area. With 1.2 billion people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the north, the Isthmus of Suez and the Red Sea to the northeast, the Indian Ocean to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The continent includes Madagascar and various archipelagos. It contains 54 fully recognised sovereign states (countries), nine territories and two de facto independent states with limited or no recognition. The majority of the continent and its countries are in the Northern Hemisphere, with a substantial portion and number of countries in the Southern Hemisphere.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is an organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and eFootball. FIFA is responsible for the organization of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

Contents

Cup history

There is an anomaly on national teams in the case of Tanzania. It fields two teams, Tanzania and Zanzibar. In 2005 and 2006, the tournament was sponsored by the Ethiopian-Saudi businessman Sheikh Mohammed Al Amoudi, and was dubbed the Al Amoudi Senior Challenge Cup. [1] It is the successor competition of the Gossage Cup, held 37 times from 1926 until 1966, and the East and Central African Senior Challenge Cup, held 7 times between 1965 and 1971.

Gossage is a family name of soapmakers and alkali manufacturers. Their company eventually became part of the Unilever group. During World War II, all soap brands were abolished by British government decree in 1942, in favour of a generic soap. When conditions returned to normal post war, the Gossage brand was not revived by Unilever though the company name is still registered for legal purposes. The online 'Times Index' shows meetings of the Gossage company board until the early 1960s.

In August 2012, CECAFA signed a sponsorship deal worth US$450,000 with East African Breweries to have the cup renamed to the CECAFA Tusker Challenge Cup. [2]

United States dollar Currency of the United States of America

The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States and its territories per the United States Constitution since 1792. In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills (₥) for accounting. The circulating paper money consists of Federal Reserve Notes that are denominated in United States dollars.

East African Breweries company

East African Breweries Limited, commonly referred to as EABL, is a Kenya-based holding company that manufactures branded beer, spirits, and non-alcoholic beverages.

Previous winners

Gossage Cup (1926–1966) and Challenge Cup (1967–1971)

The Gossage Cup was contested between Kenya, Uganda, Tanganyika and Zanzibar. The first match was played between the Kenyan and Ugandan national teams in May 1926, with Kenya winning 2–1 in a replay. [3] [4] Tanganyika participated since 1945 and Zanzibar since 1949. The tournament was sponsored by the soap manufacturer Gossage, owned by the British Lever Brothers. In 1967, the competition was renamed to the East and Central African Senior Challenge Cup. [5]

Kenya republic in East Africa

Kenya, officially the Republic of Kenya, is a country in Africa with 47 semiautonomous counties governed by elected governors. At 580,367 square kilometres (224,081 sq mi), Kenya is the world's 48th largest country by total area. With a population of more than 52.2 million people, Kenya is the 27th most populous country. Kenya's capital and largest city is Nairobi while its oldest city and first capital is the coastal city of Mombasa. Kisumu City is the third largest city and a critical inland port at Lake Victoria. Other important urban centres include Nakuru and Eldoret.

Uganda republic in East Africa

Uganda, officially the Republic of Uganda, is a landlocked country in East-Central Africa. It is bordered to the east by Kenya, to the north by South Sudan, to the west by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, to the south-west by Rwanda, and to the south by Tanzania. The southern part of the country includes a substantial portion of Lake Victoria, shared with Kenya and Tanzania. Uganda is in the African Great Lakes region. Uganda also lies within the Nile basin, and has a varied but generally a modified equatorial climate.

Tanganyika mainland part of Tanzania, independent country from 1962 to 1964

Tanganyika was a sovereign state, comprising the mainland part of present-day Tanzania, that existed from 1961 until 1964. It first gained independence from the United Kingdom on 9 December 1961 as a state headed by Queen Elizabeth II before becoming a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations exactly a year later. After signing the Articles of Union on 22 April 1964 and passing an Act of Union on 25 April, Tanganyika officially joined with the People's Republic of Zanzibar and Pemba to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar on Union Day, 26 April 1964. The new state changed its name to the United Republic of Tanzania within a year.

CECAFA Cup

With the formation of CECAFA in 1973, the tournament was renamed to the CECAFA Cup.

CECAFA

The Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations is an association of the football playing nations in East and Central Africa. An affiliate of the Confederation of African Football (CAF), it is the oldest sub-regional football organisation on the continent.

Key
*Match was won on a penalty shootout
Tournament not held or not officially recognised
List of CECAFA Cup winners
YearHostFinalThird place play-off
WinnerScoreRunner-upThird placeScoreFourth place
1973 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–1Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia [1]
1974 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 1–1* [A] Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar [1]
1975 Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 0–0* [B] Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda [1]
1976 Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi [1]
1977 Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 0–0* [C] Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 2–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
1978 Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 3–2Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2–0Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
1979 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 3–2Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 2–1Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar
1980 Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 1–0Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 1–0Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia
1981 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1–0Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 1–0Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
1982 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1–1* [D] Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 3–0Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar
1983 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1–0Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1–0Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi
1984 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 0–0* [E] Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 3–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
1985 Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 2–0Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 3–1Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
1986
Not held (initially Somalia but later withdrew)
1987 Flag of Ethiopia (1987-1991).svg  Ethiopia Flag of Ethiopia (1987-1991).svg  Ethiopia 1–1* [F] Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 3–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
1988 Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 3–1Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 0–0* [G] Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe
1989 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 3–3* [H] Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1–0Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia
1990 Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 2–1Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar
1991 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 2–0Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 3–1Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan
1992 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1–0Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania B Flag of Zambia (1964-1996).svg  Zambia 4–0Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi
1993
Not held (Initially Uganda but later withdrew)
1994 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 2–2* [I] Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1–0Flag of Eritrea (1993-1995).svg  Eritrea
1995 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Zanzibar-jan-avr-1964.svg  Zanzibar 1–0Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda B Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2–2* [J] Flag of Ethiopia (1991-1996).svg  Ethiopia
1996 Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1–0Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan B Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 1–1* [K] Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
1997
Not held (CECAFA suspended)
1998
1999 Flag of Rwanda (1962-2001).svg  Rwanda Flag of Rwanda (1962-2001).svg  Rwanda B 3–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Rwanda (1962-2001).svg  Rwanda 0–0* [L] Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
2000 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda B Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia 1–1* [M] Flag of Rwanda (1962-2001).svg  Rwanda
2001 Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia 2–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda 1–0Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda B
2002 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3–2Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda 2–1Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
2003 Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2–1Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan
2004 Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia 3–0Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 2–1Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
2005 Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia 1–0Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar 0–0* [N] Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
2006 Flag of Ethiopia (1996-2009).svg  Ethiopia Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 0–0* [O] Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda 0–0* [P] Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda
2007 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 2–2 * [Q] Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0 Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
2008 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1–0 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 3–2 Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
2009 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–0 Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar 1–0 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania
2010 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 1–0 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Côte d'Ivoire B Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 4–3 Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia
2011 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–2 * [R] Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 1–0 Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania
2012 Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–1 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar 1–1 * [S] Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania
2013 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2–0 Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 1–1 * [T] Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania
2014
Not held (initially Ethiopia but later withdrew) §
2015 Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1–0 Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 1–1 * [U] Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan
2016
Not held (initially Sudan, then Kenya but both later withdrew)
2017 Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 2–2 * [V] Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 2–1 Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi
2018
Not held (initially Zanzibar, then Kenya but both later withdrew) [6]

§ The 2014 CECAFA Cup would have been the 38th edition of the Cup. It was scheduled to take place in Ethiopia from 24 November to 9 December, [7] [8] but the nation withdrew from hosting the tournament in October due to "domestic and international engagements", [9] according to CECAFA secretary-general Nicholas Musonye. Musonye also announced that Sudan as one of the countries that could have replaced Ethiopia as the hosts of the tournament. [10] After none of the 12 member nations of CECAFA expressed an interest in hosting the tournament on short notice, it was announced on 27 November that CECAFA had cancelled the competition. Rwanda hosted the 2015 edition of the competition. [11]
The 2016 CECAFA Cup was to be the 39th edition of the annual CECAFA Cup. In September 2016, it was confirmed that Kenya would host the tournament. [12] Originally, it was slated to be hosted in Sudan. [13] In November 2016, Kenya announced they are not ready to host the tournament and CECAFA officials are looking to persuade Sudan to take over as hosts. [14] In December 2016, CECAFA announced the 2016 edition of the tournament will be canceled. [15]

Ethiopia country in East Africa

Ethiopia, officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, is a country in the northeastern part of Africa, popularly known as the Horn of Africa. It shares borders with Eritrea to the north, Djibouti to the northeast, and Somalia to the east, Sudan to the northwest, South Sudan to the west, and Kenya to the south. With over 102 million inhabitants, Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world and the second-most populous nation on the African continent that covers a total area of 1,100,000 square kilometres (420,000 sq mi). Its capital and largest city is Addis Ababa, which lies a few miles west of the East African Rift that splits the country into the Nubian Plate and the Somali Plate.

Sudan Country in Northeast Africa

Sudan or the Sudan, officially the Republic of the Sudan, is a country in Northeast Africa. It is bordered by Egypt to the north, the Red Sea to the northeast, Eritrea to the east, Ethiopia to the southeast, South Sudan to the south, the Central African Republic to the southwest, Chad to the west, and Libya to the northwest. It has a population of 39 million people and occupies a total area of 1,886,068 square kilometres, making it the third-largest country in Africa. Sudan's predominant religion is Islam, and its official languages are Arabic and English. The capital is Khartoum, located at the confluence of the Blue and White Nile. Since 2011, Sudan is the scene of ongoing military conflict in its regions South Kordofan and Blue Nile.

Rwanda Country in Africa

Rwanda, officially the Republic of Rwanda, is a country in Central and East Africa and one of the smallest countries on the African mainland. Located a few degrees south of the Equator, Rwanda is bordered by Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Rwanda is in the African Great Lakes region and is highly elevated; its geography is dominated by mountains in the west and savanna to the east, with numerous lakes throughout the country. The climate is temperate to subtropical, with two rainy seasons and two dry seasons each year.

Notes

  • 1 ^ – From 1973 to 1976 there was no third place play-off and both teams eliminated in the semi-finals were acknowledged as the third-placed team.

  • A ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Tanzania won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • B ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • C ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • D ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • E ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zambia won the shoot-out 3–0.
  • F ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • G ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 3-2.
  • H ^ – Score was 3–3 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 2–1.
  • I ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Tanzania won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • J ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • K ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Sudan won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • L ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Rwanda won the shoot-out 3–2.
  • M ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 5–3.
  • N ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 5–4.
  • O ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Zambia won the shoot-out 11–10, but Sudan were given the title as Zambia were invited as guests.
  • P ^ – Score was 0–0 after 90 minutes. Rwanda won the shoot-out 4–2.
  • Q ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Sudan won the shoot-out 4–2.
  • R ^ – Score was 2–2 after 90 minutes. Uganda won the shoot-out 3–2.
  • S ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 6–5.
  • T ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Zanzibar won the shoot-out 6–5.
  • U ^ – Score was 1–1 after 90 minutes. Ethiopia won the shoot-out 4–3.
  • V ^ – Score was 2–2 after 120 minutes. Kenya won the shoot-out 3–2.

Statistics

Performance by nation

TeamYears
Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi 1
2 2004
3
4 1999, 2007, 2008, 2017
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 1
2 2010 [b] [i]
3
4
Flag of Eritrea.svg  Eritrea 1
2
3
4 1994
Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 1 1987, 2001, 2004, 2005
2
3 2000, 2015
4 1995, 2010
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 1 1975, 1981, 1982, 1983, 2002, 2013, 2017
2 1979, 1985, 1991, 1999, 2001, 2008, 2012
3 1978, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 2003
4 1977, 1984, 1996, 2004
Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi [i] 1 1978, 1979, 1988
2 1975, 1984, 1989
3 1977, 1980, 1985
4 1983, 1992
Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda 1 1999 [b]
2 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2015
3 1999, 2001, 2002, 2006
4 2000, 2001 [b]
Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 1 1980, 2006, 2007
2 1990, 1996 [b] , 2013
3 1996, 2004, 2011
4 1991, 2003, 2015
Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 1 1974, 1994, 2010
2 1973, 1980, 1981, 1992 [b] , 2002
3 1979, 1990, 2008
4 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 1 1973, 1976, 1977, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1996, 2000, 2003, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2015
2 1974, 1982, 1994, 1995 [b] , 2000
3 1983, 1984, 1987, 1991, 2007, 2010, 2017
4 1978, 1981, 1985, 2002, 2005, 2006
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia [i] 1 1984, 1991
2 1976, 1977, 1978, 1988, 2006
3 1981, 1992, 2013
4 1980, 1989
Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar 1 1995
2 2017
3 2005, 2009, 2012
4 1979, 1982, 1987, 1990
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe [i] 1 1985
2 1983, 1987
3 1982
4 1988

By number of titles won and editions participated in

Team1st2nd3rd4thPldLast
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda 43 2017
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 36 2017
Flag of Ethiopia.svg  Ethiopia 25 2017
Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania 35 2017
Flag of Malawi.svg  Malawi 21 2012
Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan 26 2015
Flag of Zambia.svg  Zambia 21 2013
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 11 2011
Flag of Zanzibar.svg  Zanzibar 33 2017
Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda B 2 2001
Flag of Rwanda.svg  Rwanda 23 2017
Flag of Burundi.svg  Burundi 14 2017
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Côte d'Ivoire B 1 2010
Flag of Eritrea.svg  Eritrea 10 2012
Flag of Djibouti.svg  Djibouti 10 2011
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya B 2 1994
Flag of Libya.svg  Libya 1 2017
Flag of the Seychelles.svg  Seychelles 2 1994
Flag of Somalia.svg  Somalia 30 2016
Flag of South Sudan.svg  South Sudan 4 2017
Flag of Sudan.svg  Sudan B 1 1996
Flag of Tanzania.svg  Tanzania B 1 1992
Flag of Uganda.svg  Uganda B 2 2000

See also

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The 2013 CECAFA Cup was the 37th edition of the annual CECAFA Cup, an international football competition consisting of the national teams of member nations of the Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations (CECAFA). The tournament was held in Kenya from 27 November to 12 December.

The 2013 CECAFA Cup Final was a football match that took place on Thursday, 12 December 2013 at the Nyayo National Stadium in Nairobi to coincide with Kenya's 50th Jamhuri Day celebrations. It was contested by the hosts Kenya and Sudan to determine the winner of the 2013 CECAFA Cup.

The following article contains statistics for the 2013 CECAFA Cup, which took place in Kenya from 27 November to 12 December 2013. Goals scored from penalty shoot-outs are not counted.

The 2014 Kagame Interclub Cup was the 39th edition of the Kagame Interclub Cup, which is organised by CECAFA. It is taking place in Kigali, Rwanda from 8–24 August. Rwanda is hosting the tournament for the fourth time since its inception in 1974.

The 2016 CECAFA Women's Championship was the second edition of the association football tournament for women's national teams in the East African region. The first edition was hosted in 1986 and won by Zanzibar.

The 2017 CECAFA Cup was the 39th edition of the annual CECAFA Cup, an international football competition consisting of the national teams of member nations of the Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations (CECAFA). It took place in Kenya in December 2017.

References

  1. BBC News – Football – Africa BBC
  2. Bonnie Mugabe (30 August 2012). "Challenge Cup brought forward". The New Times. Archived from the original on 22 February 2014. Retrieved 1 September 2012.
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  4. Courtney, Barrie (15 August 2006). "Uganda - List of International Matches". RSSSF. Retrieved 9 November 2010.
  5. Aro Geraldes, Pablo. "CECAFA Senior Challenge history". RSSSF. Retrieved 19 November 2013.
  6. "2018 Cecafa Cup cancelled because of lack of hosts". BBC Sport. 12 November 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  7. "CECAFA 2014: Cecafa has confirmed Ethiopia as the host the 2014 Senior Challenge Cup". CECAFA. Archived from the original on 2014-06-28. Retrieved 6 June 2014.
  8. Jackson Oryada (24 April 2014). "Ethiopia to host 2014 Cecafa Cup". BBC Sport. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  9. "Ethiopia withdraws from hosting CECAFA Challenge Cup 2014". Kawowo Sports. Kawowo Sports Media. Archived from the original on 2014-11-02. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  10. "Ethiopia withdraws as Cecafa Challenge Cup hosts". Goal.com. 31 October 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  11. "Rwanda: CECAFA Senior Challenge Cup Cancelled". The New Times . allAfrica.com. 27 November 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  12. "Kenya step in to host Cecafa events". BBC Sport. 9 September 2016.
  13. "Sudan named as 2016 Cecafa Cup hosts". BBC Sport. 5 January 2015. Retrieved 8 January 2015.
  14. "CECAFA looking for Cup hosts after Kenya withdrawals". New Times Rwanda. 5 November 2016. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  15. "Cecafa 2016 tournaments cancelled". BBC Sport. 9 December 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2016.

Sources