CONCACAF Women's Championship

Last updated
CONCACAF Women's Championship
Organising body CONCACAF
Founded1991;28 years ago (1991) [1]
Region North America, Central America and the Caribbean
Number of teams8
Current championsFlag of the United States.svg  United States (8th title)
Most successful team(s)Flag of the United States.svg  United States (8 titles)
Website www.concacaf.com/category/gold-cup
Soccerball current event.svg 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The CONCACAF Women's Championship, in some years called the CONCACAFWomen'sGoldCup or the CONCACAFWomen'sWorldCupqualifying, is a football competition organized by CONCACAF that often serves as the qualifying competition to the Women's World Cup. In years when the tournament has been held outside the World Cup qualifying cycle, non-CONCACAF members have been invited. CONCACAF (the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football) is the governing body for football for North America, Central America and the Caribbean. The most successful country has been the United States, winning their eighth title in 2018. [2]

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is the continental governing body for association football in North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Three geographically South American entities — the independent nations of Guyana and Suriname and the French overseas department of French Guiana — are also members. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Contents

History

2000 Gold Cup

The first Women's Gold Cup Qualifying Tournament (qualifying for the Women's World Cup) was hosted by the U.S. in 2000. Six member women's national teams participated: Canada, the U.S., Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Trinidad & Tobago, as well as two invited teams, Brazil and China. [3] The U.S. won. The 2002 Women's Gold Cup, held in Canada, was restricted to qualifying CONCACAF teams.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cups, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

The 2002 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was the second staging of the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. It was held in Seattle, Washington, United States and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

2002

Played in four venues and two countries over 14 days by eight teams, the 2002 Women's Gold Cup guaranteed two World Cup slots and one playoff spot to winners. After 16 games, played as 8 doubleheaders, the U.S.A. beat Canada in overtime. Mia Hamm scored the golden goal, taking the U.S. to their second Women's Gold Cup title. The U.S. had a 9–0–1 Gold Cup record, including 48 goals for and two goals against, both scored by Charmaine Hooper of Canada.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

Mia Hamm American association football player

Mariel Margaret Hamm-Garciaparra is an American retired professional soccer player, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion. Hailed as a soccer icon, she played as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team from 1987–2004. Hamm was the face of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's soccer league in the United States, where she played for the Washington Freedom from 2001–2003. She played college soccer for the North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team and helped the team win four consecutive NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship titles.

Charmaine Elizabeth Hooper is a former soccer striker who played for the Canadian women's national team. She scored 71 international goals in 128 caps. At club level Hooper played professionally in the United States, Norway, Italy and Japan.

2006

The 2006 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup was held in the United States, with games being hosted at The Home Depot Center in Carson, California and Tropical Park Stadium in Miami, Florida. This 2007 World Cup qualifying tournament featured six teams in single-elimination, with the top two teams qualifying directly for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China. Additionally, the third-place finisher played a two-legged home-and-away playoff against Japan (the fourth-place finisher from the Asian Confederation). [4]

Carson, California City in California, United States

Carson is a city in Los Angeles County, California, located 13 miles (21 km) south of downtown Los Angeles and approximately 14 miles away from the Los Angeles International Airport. Incorporated on February 20, 1968, Carson is the newest municipality in the South Bay region of Metropolitan Los Angeles. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 91,714.

Tropical Park Stadium is a 7,000-seat stadium located in Olympia Heights, Florida, a CDP near Miami, Florida. The stadium is located in Tropical Park and is the home field of Miami Dade FC and FC Miami City. Also, many local high-school football teams use it as their home field. It was also former home Miami FC of USL First Division.

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

Tournaments

CONCACAF Women's Championships

Tournaments not used as Women's World Cup Qualifying highlighted in pink.

YearHostFinalThird Place Match
WinnerScoreRunner-up3rd PlaceScore4th Place
1991
Details
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti Flag of the United States.svg
United States
5 – 0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
4 – 2Flag of Haiti.svg
Haiti
1993
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Round-robin Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Round-robin Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
1994
Details
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Round-robin Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Round-robin Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
1998*
Details
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
1 – 0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
4 – 0Flag of Guatemala.svg
Guatemala
2000
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1 – 0Flag of Brazil.svg
Brazil
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China PR
2 – 1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2002
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2 – 1 (gg)Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
4 – 1Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
2006
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2 – 1( a.e.t. )Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
3 – 0Flag of Jamaica.svg
Jamaica
2010
Details
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
1 – 0Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3 – 0Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
2014*
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg
United States
6 – 0Flag of Costa Rica.svg
Costa Rica
Flag of Mexico.svg
Mexico
4 – 2( a.e.t. )Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
Trinidad and Tobago
2018
Details
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2 – 0Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Jamaica.svg
Jamaica
2 – 2( a.e.t. )
(4–2 pen.)
Flag of Panama.svg
Panama

*Flag of the United States.svg  United States did not participate, as it qualified directly for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup as the host.

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup, the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was held in the United States and won by the host team. The final between the U.S. and China, held on 10 July at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California, was the most-attended women's sports event in history with an official attendance of 90,185. U.S. President Bill Clinton was among those in attendance. The final was scoreless after extra time and won by the U.S. in a penalty shootout. This remains the only Women's World Cup tournament in which the host nation has won.

*Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada did not participate, as it qualified directly for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup as the host.

2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup was the seventh FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament was hosted by Canada for the first time and by a North American country for the third time. Matches were played in six cities across Canada in five time zones. The tournament began on 6 June 2015, and finished with the final on 5 July 2015 with a United States victory over Japan.

Performance by country

TeamWinnersRunners-upThird placeFourth place
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 8 (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014, 2018)1 (2010)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2 (1998, 2010)5 (1991, 1994, 2002, 2006, 2018)1 (1993)1 (2000)
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2 (1998, 2010)4 (1994, 2002, 2006, 2014)
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 1 (2014)1 (1998)2 (2002, 2010)
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1 (2000)
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1 (1993)
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 1 (1991)3 (1993, 1994, 2014)
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 1 (2018)1 (2006)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1 (2000)
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 1 (1991)
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 1 (1998)
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 1 (2018)

Teams in Italics are Guest Nations.

Participating nations

Legend
Team Flag of Haiti.svg
1991
Flag of the United States.svg
1993
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
1994
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
1998
Flag of the United States.svg
2000
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Flag of the United States.svg
2002
Flag of the United States.svg
2006
Flag of Mexico.svg
2010
Flag of the United States.svg
2014
Flag of the United States.svg
2018
Total
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2nd3rd2nd1st4th2nd2nd1st2nd9
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica GS3rdGS4th4th2ndGS7
Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba GS1
Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 4thGSGSGS4
Flag of Guyana.svg  Guyana GS1
Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 4thGSGSGSGS5
Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica GS5thGS4thGS3rd6
Snake Flag of Martinique.svg  Martinique GSGSGS3
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico GS3rd2ndGS3rd3rd2nd3rdGS9
Flag of Panama.svg  Panama GSGS4th3
Flag of Puerto Rico.svg  Puerto Rico GS1
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 3rd4th4thGSGSGSGSGS4thGS10
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 1st1st1st1st1st1st3rd1st1st9
Non-CONCACAF Invitees
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 2nd1
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 3rd1
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2nd1
Total8458886888

General statistics

As of the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. Teams in bold are participating in the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. Teams in italics are non-CONCACAF invitees.

RankTeamPartPldWDLGFGADifPts
1Flag of the United States.svg  United States 93937111996+193112
2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 939291917932+14788
3Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 936182169480+1456
4Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 10371322244127−8341
5Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 729131154674−2840
6Flag of Haiti.svg  Haiti 51750121559−4415
7Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 15401246+1812
8Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 15311223+1910
9Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 62041142669−4313
10Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 41420121168−576
11Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 1311173+44
12Flag of Panama.svg  Panama 393151232−2010
13Snake Flag of Martinique.svg  Martinique 390271259−472
14Flag of Guyana.svg  Guyana 13003319−160
15Flag of Puerto Rico.svg  Puerto Rico 13003038−380
16Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 13003029–290

See also

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References

  1. "2007 CONCACAF Gold Cup – Technical Report" (pdf). CONCACAF. 12 November 2007. p. 4. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  2. "Wambach fires for four, U.S. claims CWC title". concacaf.com. Retrieved 2014-10-26.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2007-02-12. Retrieved 2006-02-21.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. The Official Site of U.S. Soccer – Women's National Team