COVID-19 pandemic in American Samoa

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in American Samoa
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location American Samoa
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Arrival date9 November 2020 [1]
(11 months and 5 days ago)
Confirmed cases8 [1]
Suspected cases0
Recovered3
Deaths
0
Suspected cases have not been confirmed by laboratory tests as being due to this strain, although some other strains may have been ruled out.

The COVID-19 pandemic in American Samoa is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the unincorporated United States territory of American Samoa on 9 November 2020. [1]

Contents

Background

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019. [2] [3]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003, [4] [5] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll. [6] [4]

Timeline

March 2020

On 6 March, the American Samoan government introduced new entry restrictions including restricting flight numbers and requiring travelers from Hawaii to spend 14 days in Hawaii and obtain a health clearance from health authorities. [7] On 11 March, a government task-force was set up to deal with the virus and quarantining measures have been put in place for incoming visitors. [8] On 14 March, half of the 210 passengers on a returning Hawaiian Airlines flight were required to self-quarantine at home. [9] Following a trip to the US mainland, Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga self-isolated as a precautionary measure on 16 March. [10]

On 26 March, Iulogologo Joseph Pereira, executive assistant to the American Samoa Governor and the head of the territory's coronavirus task force, acknowledged that the territory did not have facilities to test samples of the COVID-19 virus, having to rely on testing facilities in Atlanta, Georgia. [11]

April 2020

On 19 April, United States President Donald Trump declared that a major disaster existed in American Samoa, responding to a request for help from Governor Lolo Matalasi Moliga on 13 April. This declaration makes the territory eligible for federal assistance to combat the spread of the coronavirus. The US Federal Emergency Management Agency has named its Regional 9 administrator Robert Fenton Junior as the Coordinating Officer for any federal recovery operations in American Samoa. [12]

May 2020

As of 6 May, the US territory has reported no cases. [13]

November 2020

On 9 November, American Samoa reported its first three cases, who were crew members aboard the container ship Fesco Askold. [1] [14] This marked the confirmed spread of COVID-19 to every inhabited US territory; the disease had previously been confirmed to have spread to all 50 states and the District of Columbia with the confirmation of a case in West Virginia on 17 March.

On 18 November, the Department of Health, Port Administration and the Fesco Askold's owners reached an agreement to allow local stevedores to offload and load containers from the container vessel. [15] According to Radio New Zealand, the Fesco Askold is scheduled to leave American Samoa on 19 November. [16]

December 2020

On 21 December, American Samoa started its COVID-19 vaccinations by vaccinating its health workers and first responders with the Pfizer vaccine. [17] On the same day, another case was reported as a crew member aboard the container ship Coral Islander tested positive. [18]

March 2021

By 6 March 2021, nearly 24,000 COVID-19 vaccines had been administered in the territory. According to the Department of Health official's 's Aifili Dr John Tufa, this amounts to roughly 42% of American Samoa's eligible population. [19]

April 2021

On 18 April 2021, Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga announced a positive case in quarantine on a man repatriated from Hawaii. [20]

August 2021

On August 13, 2021, the government of American Samoa made vaccination against COVID-19 mandatory for entry into the territory as soon as the FDA issued full approval, which it did for the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine on August 23. [21]

September 2021

A sixth case (commonly reported as the first territorial case in the media, with cargo ship and previous quarantine cases excluded) was found in a group of travelers quarantining at their hotel on September 18. [22] The infected person is a fully vaccinated resident who had returned from travel to Hawaii and the continental United States on the first commercial flight between Honolulu and Page Pago after service was restored. [23] In reaction, the person was taken to another facility to isolate, and flights into the island have been suspended indefinitely. [24]

October 2021

Two more cases (the third counted imported case, and the seventh and eight overall) were reported on October 2. They were fully vaccinated residents quarantining after returning on a flight from Honolulu on September 27. In response, the patients and three close contacts were put in isolation. [25]

See also

Related Research Articles

The following lists events that happened during 2020 in Oceania.

COVID-19 pandemic in Australia Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Australia

The COVID-19 pandemic in Australia is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first confirmed case in Australia was identified on 25 January 2020, in Victoria, when a man who had returned from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, tested positive for the virus.

COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania Ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached Oceania on 25 January 2020 with the first confirmed case reported in Melbourne, Australia. It has since spread elsewhere in the region, although many small Pacific island nations have thus far avoided the outbreak by closing their international borders. Three Oceania sovereign states and one dependency have yet to report a case. Australia and New Zealand were praised for their handling of the pandemic in comparison to other Western nations, with New Zealand and each state in Australia wiping out all community transmission of the virus several times even after re-introduction in the community.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Maldives is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have spread to the Maldives on 7 March 2020 from a 69-year-old Italian tourist who had returned to Italy after spending holidays in Kuredu Resort & Spa. The Health Protection Agency of the Maldives confirmed two cases in the Maldives, both employees of the resort. Following this, the hotel was locked down with several tourists stranded on the island. As of 11 March, the resorts of Kuredu, Vilamendhoo, Batalaa, and Kuramathi island were also placed under temporary quarantine. Schools were closed as a precaution.

COVID-19 pandemic in Honduras Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Honduras

Honduras has a total population of 9,478,505 .The COVID-19 pandemic in Honduras the pandemic is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was first confirmed to have spread to Honduras on 10 March 2020, when two women tested positive for the virus after one of them landed on Toncontín International Airport in a flight from Madrid, Spain, and the other on Ramón Villeda Morales International Airport in a flight from Geneva, Switzerland. Confirmed cases have been reported in all 18 departments of the country, with the majority of cases located in Cortés and Francisco Morazán.

COVID-19 pandemic in Samoa Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Samoa

The COVID-19 pandemic in Samoa is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Samoa on 18 November 2020. Samoa has only official declared one confirmed case of COVID-19 to the WHO.

COVID-19 pandemic in South Sudan Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in South Sudan

The COVID-19 pandemic in South Sudan is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached South Sudan on 5 April 2020. The first four confirmed cases were all UN workers.

COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Fiji

The COVID-19 pandemic in Fiji is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first case of the disease in Fiji was reported on 19 March 2020 in Lautoka. As of 11 October 2021, the country has had a total of 51,535 cases as of which 2,436 are currently active and 653 deaths, with cases reported on the main islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, and outer islands of Malolo, Naviti, Ovalau, Gau, Beqa and Kadavu. Apart from the COVID-19 deaths, 534 COVID-19 positive patients have died from pre-existing non-COVID-19 related illnesses. In March 2021, Fiji became the first Pacific island country to receive COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX initiative with frontline workers and first responders the first to be vaccinated. As of 10 October 2021, out of the target population of 618,173, more than 590,000 (96%) Fijians have received their first jab of the vaccine and almost 490,000 (80%) Fijians have received their second jab and are fully vaccinated. To date, only the AstraZeneca vaccine, Moderna vaccine and the Pfizer BioNTech vaccine have been deployed in the country. Vaccination is mandated, however only to the adult population.

COVID-19 pandemic in Kiribati

The COVID-19 pandemic in Kiribati is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Kiribati on 18 May 2021.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Vanuatu is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Vanuatu on 11 November 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the French overseas collectivity of New Caledonia on 18 March 2020. All cases are on the main island of Grand Terre and are related to travel abroad. On 7 May, all cases had recovered.

COVID-19 pandemic in the Cook Islands

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Cook Islands is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. As of 26 August 2021, the Cook Islands has not detected any active cases of SARS-CoV-2 and remains 'COVID-free'. On the 24 August 2021, the Cook Islands completed its COVID-19 vaccination program with 96.7 percent of eligible population (16+) fully vaccinated.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in December 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in January 2021

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in January 2021, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

COVID-19 managed isolation in New Zealand

Managed isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) is a quarantine system implemented by the New Zealand Government during the country's COVID-19 pandemic. Under the system, people entering New Zealand, COVID-19 positive cases and some of their close contacts are required to isolate at an MIQ facility for 14 days. Compulsory managed isolation and quarantine was announced by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern at the daily 1 pm (NZT) press conference on 9 April 2020, with the system coming into effect for people boarding flights to New Zealand from midnight that day. The government has contracted dozens of hotels in five cities that are exclusively used as managed isolation facilities. The task is organised by the Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) unit, part of the COVID-19 All-of-Government Response Group.

Events from 2020 in American Samoa.

Responses to the COVID-19 pandemic in November 2020

This article documents the chronology of the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in November 2020, which originated in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect. Reporting on this pandemic began in December 2019.

New Zealand government response to the COVID-19 pandemic Overview of NZ government response to Covid-19

The New Zealand Government responded to the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand in various ways. In early February 2020, the Government barred entry to most travellers from China in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic originating in Wuhan. In addition, the Government sponsored several repatriation flights for returning citizens, residents, and their family members, beginning with Wuhan in February 2020. Following the country's first case originating from Iran, the Government imposed travel restrictions on travellers originating from Iran.

Social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand

The COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand has had far-reaching consequences on the country that went beyond the spread of the disease itself and efforts to eliminate it, including education, faith communities, Māori, mass gatherings, sports, recreation, and travel. In addition, there were several recorded cases of lockdown violations, leaks, and misinformation about the COVID-19 virus and vaccines.

This article documents the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2, the virus which causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia during the first half of 2021.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Covid 19 coronavirus: Samoan officials on alert after three sailors test positive". The New Zealand Herald . 10 November 2020. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 9 November 2020.
  2. Elsevier. "Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier Connect. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  3. Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN   1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  4. 1 2 "Crunching the numbers for coronavirus". Imperial News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  5. "High consequence infectious diseases (HCID); Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  6. "World Federation Of Societies of Anaesthesiologists – Coronavirus". www.wfsahq.org. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  7. "American Samoa tightens entry requirements over Covid-19". Radio New Zealand . 6 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  8. "American Samoa establishes Covid-19 govt taskforce". Radio New Zealand . 11 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  9. "Half of flight's passengers to self-quarantine in American Samoa". Radio New Zealand . 14 March 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  10. "Covid-19: American Samoa governor self-isolates as a precaution". Radio New Zealand . 16 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  11. Georgiev, Peter; Kaplan, Adiel (26 March 2020). "American Samoa's coronavirus conundrum: No way to test". NBC News . Retrieved 27 March 2020.
  12. "Trump declares Covid-19 disaster for American Samoa". Radio New Zealand . 19 April 2020. Archived from the original on 20 April 2020. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  13. Romero, Simon (6 May 2020). "A Place in the U.S. With No Covid-19? Look to American Samoa". New York Times. Archived from the original on 8 May 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  14. "Three crewmembers on container vessel test positive for COVID-19". Samoa News . 9 November 2020. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  15. "American Samoa looks to speed up loading of vessel that had Covid cases". Radio New Zealand . 18 November 2020. Archived from the original on 18 November 2020. Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  16. "Fesco Askold due to depart American Samoa today". Radio New Zealand . 19 November 2020. Archived from the original on 19 November 2020. Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  17. "American Samoa starts Covid-19 vaccinations". Radio New Zealand . 21 December 2020. Retrieved 24 December 2020.
  18. "Covid-19 positive sailor in American Samoa port". Radio New Zealand . 21 December 2020. Retrieved 17 January 2021.
  19. "Close to 24,000 Covid-19 vaccines rolled out in American Samoa". Radio New Zealand . 6 March 2021. Archived from the original on 7 March 2021. Retrieved 7 March 2021.
  20. "1 confirmed case, Gov assures we're safe". Talanei. Retrieved 19 April 2021.
  21. Pfizer FDA Update - press release from governor (remove *s from URL)
  22. "American Samoa reports first positive COVID-19 case". www.cbsnews.com. Retrieved 18 September 2021.
  23. "The Latest: American Samoa reports first case of coronavirus". AP NEWS. 17 September 2021. Retrieved 18 September 2021.
  24. Williams, Jordan (17 September 2021). "American Samoa reports first case of COVID-19". TheHill. Retrieved 18 September 2021.
  25. "American Samoa confirms two Covid-19 cases". RNZ. 2 October 2021. Retrieved 4 October 2021.