COVID-19 pandemic in Cape Verde

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in Cape Verde
CVerde-COVID-19.svg
 Municipalities with 300 to 2999 cases reported by the National Institute of Public Health
 Municipalities with 30 to 299 cases reported by the National Institute of Public Health
 Municipalities with 3 to 29 cases reported by the National Institute of Public Health
 Municipalities with 1 or 2 cases reported by the National Institute of Public Health [1]
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location Cape Verde
Arrival date20 March 2020
(1 year, 7 months, 4 weeks and 1 day)
Confirmed cases38,309 [2] (updated 18 November 2021)
Deaths
350 [2] (updated 18 November 2021)
Government website
COVID 19 — Corona Vírus - Official site about COVID-19 in Cape Verde

The COVID-19 pandemic in Cape Verde is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The virus was confirmed to have reached Cape Verde in March 2020. [3]

Contents

Background

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019. [4] [5]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003, [6] [7] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll. [8] [6] Model-based simulations for Cape Verde suggest that the 95% confidence interval for the time-varying reproduction number R t has been lower than 1.0 since August 2021. [9]

Timeline

March 2020

On 20 March, the first case of COVID-19 in the country was confirmed, being a 62-year-old foreigner from the United Kingdom. [10] [11]

Two more cases were confirmed the following day on 21 March. Both cases were tourists, one from the Netherlands, aged 60, and one from United Kingdom, aged 62. These two cases and the previous one were all on Boa Vista island before testing positive. [12] The first death was announced [13] on 24 March, regarding the first confirmed case in Cape Verde.

On 25 March, a fourth case was confirmed, a 43-year-old national citizen who had returned from Europe, being the first case detected in the country's capital, Praia, on Santiago island. [14] [15] On the following day, 26 March, Cape Verde's Health minister announced that the man's wife had also tested positive, thus being the first reported local transmission. [16]

Of the five confirmed cases in March, by the end of the month one had died while four remained active cases. [17]

April to June 2020

In April there were 116 new cases, raising the total number of confirmed cases to 121. The death toll remained unchanged and four patients recovered, leaving 116 active cases at the end of the month. [18]

In May there were 314 new cases, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 435. The death toll rose to 4. There were 189 recoveries, raising the number of recovered patients to 193 and leaving 238 active cases at the end of the month. [19]

There were 792 new cases in June, raising the total number of confirmed cases to 1227. The death toll rose to 15. The number of recovered patients increased to 629, leaving 583 active cases at the end of the month. [20]

July to September 2020

The number of confirmed cases nearly doubled in July, to 2451. The death toll rose by eight to 23. The number of recovered patients increased to 1824, leaving 604 active cases at the end of the month (4% more than at the end of June). [21]

There were 1433 new cases in August, raising the total number of confirmed cases to 3884. The death toll rose to 40. At the end of the month there were 928 active cases. [22]

There were 2016 new cases in September, raising the total number of confirmed cases to 5900. The death toll rose to 59. The number of recovered patients increased to 5228, leaving 613 active cases at the end of the month. [23]

October to December 2020

There were 2948 new cases in October, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 8848. The death toll rose to 95. The number of recovered patients increased to 8012, leaving 739 active cases at the end of the month. [24]

There were 1913 new cases in November, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 10761. The death toll rose to 105. The number of recovered patients increased to 10329, leaving 327 active cases at the end of the month. [25]

There were 1032 new cases in December, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 11793. The death toll rose to 112. The number of recovered patients increased to 11530, leaving 151 active cases at the end of the month. [26]

January to March 2021

There were 2277 new cases in January, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 14070. The death toll rose to 134. The number of recovered patients increased to 13144, leaving 792 active cases at the end of the month. [27]

There were 1330 new cases in February, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 15400. The death toll rose to 147. The number of recovered patients increased to 14814, leaving 439 active cases at the end of the month. [28]

Cape Verde's vaccination campaign began on 19 March. [29]

There were 2070 new cases in March, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 17470. The death toll rose to 168. The number of recovered patients increased to 16277, leaving 1025 active cases at the end of the month. [30]

April to June 2021

There were 6084 new cases in April, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 23554. The death toll rose to 213. The number of recovered patients increased to 20257, leaving 3084 active cases at the end of the month. [31]

There were 6805 new cases in May, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 30359. The death toll rose to 264. The number of recovered patients increased to 28428, leaving 1667 active cases at the end of the month. [32]

There were 2098 new cases in June, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 32457. The death toll rose to 286. The number of recovered patients increased to 31565, leaving 606 active cases at the end of the month. [33]

July to September 2021

There were 1334 new cases in July, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 33791. The death toll rose to 298. The number of recovered patients increased to 33011, leaving 482 active cases at the end of the month. [34]

There were 1563 new cases in August, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 35354. The death toll rose to 313. The number of recovered patients increased to 34245, leaving 796 active cases at the end of the month. [35]

There were 2222 new cases in September, taking the total number of confirmed cases to 37576. The death toll rose to 339. The number of recovered patients increased to 36676, leaving 561 active cases at the end of the month. [36]

October to December 2021

There were 639 new cases in October, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 38215. The death toll rose to 349. The number of recovered patients increased to 37708, leaving 158 active cases at the end of the month. [37]

Statistics

Confirmed new cases per day

Confirmed deaths per day

Prevention

Since 16 March tests are being made in Cape Verde rather than abroad, by the Laboratório de Virologia de Cabo Verde, in Praia. [38]

On 17 March, as a contingency measure, Prime Minister José Ulisses Correia e Silva announced [39] [40] [41] a three week suspension suspension of all incoming flights from the US, Brazil, Senegal, Nigeria, Portugal, and all European countries affected by the coronavirus. Exceptions were made for cargo flights and flights for foreign citizens wishing to return home. The ban also applies to the docking of cruise ships, sailing ships and landing from passengers or crew from cargo ships or fishing ships. More exceptional measures [42] were taken the day after, and the contingency level was raised [43] on 27 March.

Cabo Verde Airlines had already taken the decision to suspend flights. Since 28 February the flights to Milan (Italy) are suspended. On 6 March, the flights to Lagos (Nigeria), Porto Alegre (Brazil) and Washington D.C. (United States) were also suspended. On 17 March, per to the Government's decision, Cabo Verde Airlines suspended all of its routes. [44]

On March 28, for the first time in its history, a state of emergency was declared in Cape Verde, [45] [46] implementing a set of measures. [47]

See also

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