COVID-19 pandemic in San Marino

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in San Marino
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location San Marino
First outbreak Wuhan, Hubei, China
Arrival date27 February 2020
(1 year, 5 months, 3 weeks and 5 days)
DateAs of 25 June 2021 [1]
Confirmed cases5,090 [2] (total)
Active cases0 [2] (in quarantine or isolation)
Hospitalized cases0 (active)
Critical cases0 (active)
Recovered5,000 [2] (total)
Deaths
90 [2] (total)
Fatality rate2.06%
Government website
www.iss.sm

The COVID-19 pandemic in San Marino is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The virus was confirmed to have reached San Marino in February 2020.

Contents

As of 11 May 2021, with 5,083 confirmed cases out of a population of 33,600 (as of 2020), it was the country with the fourth-highest percentage of confirmed cases per capita at 15.13% – 1 confirmed case per 7 inhabitants. Also, with 90 confirmed deaths, the country has one of the highest rate of confirmed deaths per capita at 0.268% of the total population – 1 death per 373 inhabitants. [3] The crude fatality rate is 2.63%. [4] It was once declared "Covid-free" on 26 June 2020, [5] although on 9 July it had another case, and while this had recovered by the end of the month, the epidemics has returned later and most of recorded covid-assigned fatalities had happened after that.

Background

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan, Hubei, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019. [6] [7]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003, [8] [9] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll. [10] [8]

Timeline

COVID-19 cases in San Marino  ()
     Deaths        Recoveries        Active cases
FebFebMarMarAprAprMayMayJunJun
Last 15 daysLast 15 days
Date
# of cases
# of deaths
2020-02-27
1(n.a.)
2020-02-28
2(+100%)
2020-02-29
3(+50%)
2020-03-01
8(+167%)
2020-03-02
9(+13%)1(n.a.)
2020-03-03
11(+22%)1
2020-03-04
16(+45%)1
2020-03-05
22(+38%)1
2020-03-06
24(+9%)1
2020-03-07
27(+13%)1
2020-03-08
37(+37%)1
2020-03-09
51(+38%)2(+100%)
2020-03-10
62(+22%)2
2020-03-11
69(+11%)3(+50%)
2020-03-12
72(+4%)5(+67%)
2020-03-13
80(+11%)5
2020-03-14
101(+26%)5
2020-03-15
109(+8%)7(+40%)
2020-03-16
115(+6%)9(+29%)
2020-03-17
119(+3%)11(+22%)
2020-03-18
127(+7%)14(+27%)
2020-03-19
144(+13%)14
2020-03-20
151(+5%)14
2020-03-21
160(+6%)20(+43%)
2020-03-22
175(+9%)20
2020-03-23
187(+7%)20
2020-03-24
18721(+5%)
2020-03-25
208(+11%)21
2020-03-26
218(+5%)21
2020-03-27
223(+2%)21
2020-03-28
224(+0.45%)22(+4.8%)
2020-03-29
229(+2.2%)24(+9.1%)
2020-03-30
230(+0.4%)25(+4.2%)
2020-03-31
236(+2.6%)26(+4%)
2020-04-01
23628(+8%)
2020-04-02
245(+3.8%)30(+7.1%)
2020-04-03
251(+2.4%)32(+6.7%)
2020-04-04
259(+3.2%)32
2020-04-05
266(+2.7%)32
2020-04-06
277(+4.1%)32
2020-04-07
279(+0.7%)34(+6.3%)
2020-04-08
308(+10.4%)34
2020-04-09
333(+8.1%)34
2020-04-10
344(+3.3%)34
2020-04-11
356(+3.5%)35(+2.9%)
2020-04-12
35635
2020-04-13
371(+4.2%)36(+2.9%)
2020-04-14
372(+0.3%)36
2020-04-15
393(+5.6%)36
2020-04-16
426(+8.4%)38(+5.6%)
2020-04-17
435(+2.1%)39(+2.6%)
2020-04-18
455(+4.6%)39
2020-04-19
461(+1.3%)39
2020-04-20
462(+0.2%)39
2020-04-21
476(+3%)40(+2.6%)
2020-04-22
488(+2.5%)40
2020-04-23
501(+2.7%)40
2020-04-24
513(+2.4%)40
2020-04-25
535(+4.3%)40
2020-04-26
538(+0.6%)41(+2.5%)
2020-04-27
53841
2020-04-28
553(+2.8%)41
2020-04-29
563(+1.8%)41
2020-04-30
569(+1.1%)41
2020-05-01
580(+1.9%)41
2020-05-02
58041
2020-05-03
582(+0.3%)41
2020-05-04
58241
2020-05-05
589(+1.2%)41
2020-05-06
608(+3.2%)41
2020-05-07
622(+2.3%)41
2020-05-08
623(+0.2%)41
2020-05-09
637(+2.2%)41
2020-05-10
628(-1.4%)41
2020-05-11
62841
2020-05-12
638(+1.6%)41
2020-05-13
643(+0.8%)41
2020-05-14
648(+0.8%)41
2020-05-15
652(+0.6%)41
2020-05-16
653(+0.2%)41
2020-05-17
654(+0.2%)41
2020-05-18
65441
2020-05-19
655(+0.2%)41
2020-05-20
656(+0.2%)41
2020-05-21
658(+0.3%)41
2020-05-22
661(+0.5%)41
2020-05-23
665(+0.6%)42(+2.4%)
2020-05-24
665(+0.6%)42
2020-05-25
666(+0.2%)42
2020-05-26
66642
2020-05-27
667(+0.2%)42
2020-05-28
670(+0.4%)42
2020-05-29
671(+0.1%)42
2020-05-30
67142
2020-05-31
2020-06-01
67142
2020-06-02
672(+0.1%)42
2020-06-03
674(+0.3%)42
2020-06-04
678(+0.6%)42
2020-06-05
680(+0.3%)42
2020-06-06
68042
2020-06-07
68042
2020-06-08
687(+1%)42
2020-06-09
688(+0.1%)42
2020-06-10
691(+0.4%)42
2020-06-11
69142
2020-06-12
694(+0.4%)42
2020-06-13
69442
2020-06-14
69442
2020-06-15
69442
2020-06-16
69442
2020-06-17
69642
2020-06-18
69642
Sources:

February 2020

On 27 February, San Marino confirmed its first case, an 88-year-old man with pre-existing medical conditions. He was hospitalised in Rimini, Italy. [11]

March 2020

On 1 March, seven more cases were confirmed and the Health Emergency Coordination Group confirmed that the 88-year-old man had died, becoming the first Sammarinese to die of the virus. [12]

On 8 March, the number of confirmed cases had increased to 36. [13]

On 10 March 63 cases were confirmed. On 11 March 66 cases were confirmed, and the death count increased to 3. [14]

On 12 March, confirmed cases count increased to 67 and the death count to 5. [15]

On 14 March, the government ordered a nationwide quarantine until 6 April. [16]

June 2020

San Marino was declared to have no active cases on 26 June. In total, 698 cases of COVID-19 had been identified, of whom 42 died and the remaining 656 recovered. [5]

July 2020

On 9 July, one case of COVID-19 was identified and isolated. [17] The patient recovered and by the end of the month, the number of active cases in the country returned to zero. [2] [18]

December 2020

As 28 December, the total number of infected people is 2,275. There are 57 deaths and 1,955 recovered.

February 2021

On 2 February 2021, Fausta Morganti, who was Captain Regent between 1 April 2005 and 1 October 2005 died from COVID-19 at the age of 76. [19]

May 2021

Health Minister Roberto Ciavatta announced that anyone booking a hotel in San Marino for at least three nights could receive the Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine for €50. [20]

As of May 2021, San Marino had administered 36,000 doses and fully vaccinated approximately 22,000 people. [20]

See also

Related Research Articles

San Marino Small state enclaved by Italy

San Marino, officially the Republic of San Marino, also known as the Most Serene Republic of San Marino, is a small state in Southern Europe enclaved by Italy. Located on the northeastern side of the Apennine Mountains, San Marino covers a land area of just over 61 km2 (24 sq mi), and has a population of 33,562.

Fausta Simona Morganti was a Captain Regent of San Marino.

San Marino in the Eurovision Song Contest

San Marino has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 11 times, debuting in the 2008 contest, followed by participation from 2011 onward. The nation did not participate in 2009 or 2010, citing financial difficulties. Having failed to qualify in their first four attempts, the nation qualified for the contest's grand final for the first time in 2014. Valentina Monetta represented San Marino in 2012, 2013 and 2014, making her the first entrant to participate in three consecutive contests since the 1960s. In 2019, Serhat managed to qualify to the grand final, marking the second appearance of the country in a Eurovision final and achieving their best result to date of 19th place. Following the 2020 contest's cancellation due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, their 2020 candidate Senhit was again selected to represent San Marino in the following contest and is the nation's most recent selected entrant as of 2021. She qualified to the final, making it the first time that San Marino made it to two consecutive finals.

San Marino debuted at the Eurovision Song Contest 2008, held in Belgrade, Serbia. The Sammarinese national broadcaster Radiotelevisione della Repubblica di San Marino (SMRTV) officially confirmed San Marino's participation in the contest in November 2007 after deliberation amongst the broadcaster's shareholders. The pop-rock band Miodio with their Italian language song "Complice" was selected internally by SMRTV to represent the nation. Promotion of the entry relied heavily on the internet, with a music video being created and interviews from the band to the press being published in the lead up to the Eurovision Song Contest 2008. San Marino performed fifth in the first semi-final, held on 20 May 2008, and placed last, receiving just five points.

San Marino has recognized civil unions for both same-sex and opposite-sex couples since 5 December 2018. The law to permit civil unions became fully operational on 11 February 2019, following a number of further legal and administrative changes.

Marina Busignani Reffi (1930–2006) was a Sammarinese painter, sculptor, ceramist, and politician.

Clara Boscaglia was a Sammarinese politician. One of the first women to be elected to the Grand and General Council, she later became the first in San Marino to serve as a government minister.

San Marino planned to participate in the Eurovision Song Contest 2020, which was scheduled to be held in Rotterdam, Netherlands. Italian singer Senhit was chosen to represent the nation with her song "Freaky!". Sammarinese broadcaster San Marino RTV (SMRTV) internally selected the singer, while her song was selected through a national final entitled Digital Battle. Senhit previously represented San Marino in the 2011 contest, but failed to qualify for the grand final. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe during 2020, the Eurovision Song Contest was cancelled in mid-March 2020. "Freaky!" was subsequently an entry for several replacement events including Eurovision: Europe Shine a Light, Der kleine Song Contest and Sveriges 12:a. Senhit announced during the former of the three that she would return to represent the nation at the 2021 contest the following year.

COVID-19 pandemic Ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019

The ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was identified in Wuhan, China, in December 2019; a lockdown in Wuhan and other cities in Hubei province failed to contain the outbreak, and it spread to other parts of mainland China and around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Since 2021, variants of the virus have emerged or become dominant in many countries, with the Delta, Alpha and Beta variants being the most virulent. As of 22 August 2021, more than 211 million cases and 4.42 million deaths have been confirmed, making it one of the deadliest pandemics in history.

COVID-19 pandemic by country and territory Data and maps, showing cases and deaths

This article provides a general overview and documents the status of locations affected by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, the capital of the province of Hubei in China in December 2019.

COVID-19 pandemic in Europe Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Europe

Italy was one of the first countries in Europe to diagnose a case of COVID-19, with its first official case being detected on February 21st, 2020. Though some studies have suggested that the virus may have already been in Italy, Europe, China, and elsewhere as early as September 2019.

COVID-19 pandemic in Italy Ongoing viral pandemic in Italy

The COVID-19 pandemic in Italy is part of the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was first confirmed to have spread to Italy on 31 January 2020, when two Chinese tourists in Rome tested positive for the virus. One week later an Italian man repatriated back to Italy from the city of Wuhan, China, was hospitalised and confirmed as the third case in Italy. Clusters of cases were later detected in Lombardy and Veneto on 21 February, with the first deaths on 22 February. By the beginning of March, the virus had spread to all regions of Italy.

COVID-19 pandemic in North America Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in North America

The first cases of the COVID-19 pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 in North America were reported in the United States on 23 January 2020. Cases were reported in all North American countries after Saint Kitts and Nevis confirmed a case on 25 March, and in all North American territories after Bonaire confirmed a case on 16 April.

COVID-19 pandemic in Monaco Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Monaco

The COVID-19 pandemic in Monaco is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Monaco on 29 February 2020. As of February 8, 2021, the infection rate is 1 case per 19 inhabitants and the death rate is 1 in 1,613.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Maldives is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have spread to the Maldives on 7 March 2020 from a 69-year-old Italian tourist who had returned to Italy after spending holidays in Kuredu Resort & Spa. The Health Protection Agency of the Maldives confirmed two cases in the Maldives, both employees of the resort. Following this, the hotel was locked down with several tourists stranded on the island. As of 11 March, the resorts of Kuredu, Vilamendhoo, Batalaa, and Kuramathi island were also placed under temporary quarantine. Schools were closed as a precaution.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Cayman Islands is part of the ongoing global viral pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which was confirmed to have reached the British Overseas Territory of the Cayman Islands in March 2020.

COVID-19 pandemic in the Central African Republic Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in the Central African Republic

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Central African Republic is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the Central African Republic in March 2020.

The COVID-19 pandemic in Northern Cyprus is part of the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2.

Timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy Timeline of notable events of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in Italy.

Events in the year 2021 in San Marino.

References

  1. "Aggiornamento Epidemia COVID-19 a San Marino al 6 febbraio 2021" (in Italian). Istituto per la Sicurezza Sociale di San Marino. 28 February 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "San Marino resta alta l'attenzione al Covid-19" (in Italian). Istituto per la Sicurezza Sociale di San Marino. 31 January 2021. Retrieved 28 February 2021.
  3. "Death rate of COVID-19: Total confirmed deaths per million people". Our World in Data. Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  4. "Case fatality rate of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic". Our World in Data. Retrieved 10 April 2020.
  5. 1 2 Torresi, Mauro (26 June 2020). "San Marino "Covid free": zero positivi in Repubblica, 40 le persone ancora in quarantena" (in Italian). San Marino Rtv. Retrieved 4 July 2020.
  6. Elsevier. "Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier Connect. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  7. Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN   1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  8. 1 2 "Crunching the numbers for coronavirus". Imperial News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  9. "High consequence infectious diseases (HCID); Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  10. "World Federation Of Societies of Anaesthesiologists – Coronavirus". wfsahq.org. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  11. "Coronavirus: primo caso nella Repubblica di San Marino". Altarimini.it (in Italian). 27 February 2020. Archived from the original on 28 February 2020. Retrieved 28 February 2020.
  12. "Coronavirus: è morto il sammarinese ricoverato a Rimini". San Marino Rtv. 1 March 2020. Archived from the original on 1 March 2020. Retrieved 6 March 2020.
  13. "Coronavirus: 36 casi, 10 in più. Sul decreto italiano: "i lavoratori potranno muoversi"". San Marino Rtv (in Italian). 8 March 2020. Retrieved 8 March 2020.
  14. "Coronavirus a San Marino: si registra il terzo decesso, 7 nuovi casi". San Marino Rtv (in Italian). 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  15. "Coronavirus updates". Istituto per la Sicurezza Sociale (in Italian). 12 March 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2020.
  16. Nuovo decreto legge in vigore fino al 6 aprile (in Italian)
  17. "Nuovo caso di Covid-19 a San Marino: subito identificato e isolato" (in Italian). Istituto per la Sicurezza Sociale di San Marino. 9 July 2020. Retrieved 8 August 2020.
  18. "Guarito il sammarinese risultato positivo alla Covid-19 a luglio" (in Italian). Istituto per la Sicurezza Sociale di San Marino. 2020. Retrieved 8 August 2020.
  19. Addio a Fausta Morganti, bandiera della sinistra sammarinese Corriereromagna.it
  20. 1 2 "San Marino offers tourists Sputnik vaccine for €50". The Local . 12 May 2021.