COVID-19 pandemic in Wallis and Futuna

Last updated

COVID-19 pandemic in Wallis and Futuna
COVID-19 Outbreak in Wallis and Futuna by islands.svg
Map of the COVID-19 pandemic in Wallis and Futuna (as of 30 April 2021)
  150+ confirmed cases
  100–150 confirmed cases
  50–100 confirmed cases
  1–50 confirmed cases
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location Wallis and Futuna
Arrival date16 October 2020
(1 year, 1 month and 4 days ago)
Confirmed cases454 [1]
Active cases0
Suspected cases0
Hospitalized cases0
Recovered447 [2]
Deaths
7 [1]
Government website
https://www.wallis-et-futuna.gouv.fr/Actualites
Suspected cases have not been confirmed by laboratory tests as being due to this strain, although some other strains may have been ruled out.

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Wallis and Futuna is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the French overseas collectivity of Wallis and Futuna on 16 October 2020. As of 24 August 2021, there have been 454 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 7 deaths reported to WHO. The last reported confirmed case was reported in April 2021. [1]

Contents

Background

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019. [3] [4]

The case fatality ratio for COVID-19 has been much lower than SARS of 2003, [5] [6] but the transmission has been significantly greater, with a significant total death toll. [7] [5]

Timeline

March 2020

On 4 March, Wallis and Futuna turned away a cruise ship over fears of infection; the possibility of denying entry to another ship by the end of the month was also under consideration. [8] Incoming flights were curtailed, except those delivering essential supplies. [9]

April 2020

On 23 April, the island began repatriating its 300 inhabitants stranded on New Caledonia. [10]

October 2020

On 16 October, the collectivity reported its first case. [11] On 23 October a new test on the first case was negative, making Wallis and Futuna COVID-free once more. [12]

November 2020

On 12 November, the collectivity reported its second case. [13] Both cases so far have been in persons with a history of travel.[ citation needed ]

On 24 November, a third case was reported. [14]

March 2021

On 6 March 2021, a patient admitted at a local hospital was confirmed as the first local COVID-19 case. [15] Six new local cases were detected on 7 March, [16] and 11 others the following day, with the first confirmed case on the island of Futuna. [17] Subsequently, a 14-day lockdown was imposed on 9 March to prevent further spread. [18] 55 positive cases were reported by 10 March, of which three were in Futuna. [19] By 14 March, 176 positive cases had been confirmed, with five reported in Futuna. [20]

A vaccination campaign was started on 19 March with the Moderna vaccine. [21] As of 1 April 2021, 3,662 people had been vaccinated (44.2% of the population). [22]

By 20 March, the collectivity had reported 302 new cases since 6 March, [23] bringing the total to 311, with nine positive cases in isolation. On 22 March, the first COVID-19-related death was confirmed, that of an 80-year-old woman from Futuna hospitalized in Wallis. By 1 May 2021, seven deaths were reported. [24] [25]

Vaccination

As of 21 July 2021, a total of 9,276 vaccine doses have been administered. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Wallis and Futuna: WHO Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) Dashboard With Vaccination Data". covid19.who.int. Retrieved 25 August 2021.
  2. "COVID-19 : Faut-il craindre une deuxième vague à Wallis et Futuna ?". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 7 May 2021.
  3. Elsevier. "Novel Coronavirus Information Center". Elsevier Connect. Archived from the original on 30 January 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  4. Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN   1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  5. 1 2 "Crunching the numbers for coronavirus". Imperial News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  6. "High consequence infectious diseases (HCID); Guidance and information about high consequence infectious diseases and their management in England". GOV.UK. Archived from the original on 3 March 2020. Retrieved 17 March 2020.
  7. "World Federation Of Societies of Anaesthesiologists – Coronavirus". www.wfsahq.org. Archived from the original on 12 March 2020. Retrieved 15 March 2020.
  8. "Coronavirus: Cruise ship banned from Wallis and Futuna". RNZ. 4 March 2020. Retrieved 4 March 2020.
  9. "Mise en place des mesures de prévention contre l'épidémie de Covid-19 dans les îles Wallis et Futuna". Government of Wallis and Futuna. 23 March 2020. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  10. "Wallis-et-Futuna instaure une quatorzaine en mer pour le retour des résidents". Journal de Saint Barth (in French). Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  11. "First Covid-19 case in Wallis and Futuna". Radio New Zealand. 16 October 2020. Retrieved 16 October 2020.
  12. "Résultats des tests PCR des personnes en confinement-23 octobre 2020 / Actualités / Accueil - Les services de l'État à Wallis et Futuna". www.wallis-et-futuna.gouv.fr. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  13. "Un nouveau cas de covid à Wallis et Futuna". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 20 November 2020.
  14. "Un nouveau cas de covid détecté à Wallis et Futuna". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 29 November 2020.
  15. "Le premier cas de covid-19 hors SAS de confinement détecté à Wallis". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  16. "Communiqué du 07/03/21-18h30 : "Détection de cas positifs à la covid-19" / Actualités / Accueil - Les services de l'État à Wallis et Futuna". www.wallis-et-futuna.gouv.fr. Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  17. "12 nouveaux cas de covid détectés à Wallis et Futuna". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  18. "Wallis et Futuna en confinement général pour 14 jours à partir de demain mardi 09 mars 2021 à 6h". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  19. "Covid-19 : 55 cas positifs à Wallis et Futuna ce mercredi 10 mars 2021". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 10 March 2021.
  20. "176 cas positifs à la covid-19 ce samedi 13 mars à Wallis et Futuna". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  21. "242 personnes ont reçu la première injection du vaccin "Moderna" à Wallis et Futuna de vendredi 19 à samedi 20 mars". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 21 March 2021.
  22. "44,2 % de la population vaccinable de Wallis et Futuna ont déjà reçu la 1ère dose de Moderna". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 1 April 2021.
  23. "Covid info n°11 du 20 mars 2021 à 13h00 / Actualités / Accueil - Les services de l'État à Wallis et Futuna". www.wallis-et-futuna.gouv.fr. Retrieved 21 March 2021.
  24. "Point presse sur le premier décès lié au covid-19". Wallis-et-Futuna la 1ère (in French). Retrieved 21 March 2021.
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