COVID-19 pandemic in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville

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COVID-19 pandemic in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville
Bougainville in Papua New Guinea (special marker).svg
Disease COVID-19
Virus strain SARS-CoV-2
Location Autonomous Region of Bougainville
Arrival dateAugust 7, 2020
(8 months, 2 weeks and 4 days)
Confirmed cases284 [1]
Recovered254
Deaths
1 [2]
Government website
Autonomous Region of Bougainville State of Emergency (SOE) COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville is part of the ongoing worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The Autonomous Region of Bougainville's confirmed its first case of the COVID-19 pandemic on Friday, August 7, 2020, in Arawa, Bougainville. [1] The first documented arrival of COVID-19 in Bougainville occurred just before the start of the Bougainvillean general and presidential elections, which took place over the course of three weeks beginning on August 12, 2020, and ending on September 1, 2020. [1] [3]

Contents

Background

On 12 January 2020, the World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed that a novel coronavirus was the cause of a respiratory illness in a cluster of people in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, which was reported to the WHO on 31 December 2019. [4] [5]

Timeline in Bougainville

August 2020

On August 1, 2020, the Autonomous Bougainville Government (ABG) began restricting flights from the rest of Papua New Guinea after a new surge of coronavirus cases COVID-19 pandemic in Papua New Guinea. [6] While a COVID-19 state of emergency was already in place, passengers had been able to fly into Buka Airport and Aropa Airport from Papua New Guinea since early June 2020. [6] Beginning August 1, flights into Bougainville could only be MEDEVAC or an approved charter flight. [6] The government also now needed to grant permission to anyone seeking to fly out of Bougainville. [6] Just one freight flight would be allowed to land in Bougainville each week. [6]

The Autonomous Bougainville Government confirmed its first positive case of COVID-19 on Friday, August 7, 2020. [1] The first patient was identified as a 22-year college student. [1] The student returned to Buka, Bougainville, passing through Buka Airport, from Port Moresby, the capital of Papua New Guinea. [1] He then traveled to Central Bougainville District before testing positive for COVID-19. [1] Once identified, the patient was quarantines in the town of Arawa. [1] Contact tracing was set up to find individuals that the man may have come in contact with. [1]

In August 2020, the government began requiring the operators and drivers of public motor vehicles (PMVs) to keep daily recorded logs of all passengers in an effort to aid contact tracing. [7] Public motors vehicles are the main form of public transportation in Bougainville. [7] The Autonomous Bougainville Government also banned travel between different localities and constituencies for four days, beginning on August 12, 2020, in an effort to stop any potential spread of COVID-19. [7]

The confirmed arrival of COVID-19 in Autonomous Region of Bougainville occurred just before the beginning of the 2020 Bougainvillean general and presidential elections, which began on August 12, 2020. [1] [3] Commissioner Ignatius Nauru of the Office of the Bougainville Electoral Commissioner said efforts were in place to educate voters about COVID-19 during the three week election. [1] Personal protective equipment (PPE), such as masks and gloves, were mandatory for all poll workers, while voters were required to sanitize their hands at the polling station. [1] [3] Voters were also asked to bring their own pens to fill out their ballots. [1]

March 2021

In March 2021, Speaker of the Bougainville House of Representatives Simon Pentanu confirmed he had been diagnosed with COVID-19 and had begun 14 days of self-quarantine. [8]

April 2021

On 20 April, Bougainville confirmed its first death from COVID-19. In addition, health authorities confirmed that there had been a total of 284 cases in the autonomous region with 254 cases having since recovered. [2]

See also

Related Research Articles

Autonomous Region of Bougainville Autonomous region of Papua New Guinea

Bougainville, officially the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, is an autonomous region in Papua New Guinea. The largest island is Bougainville Island, while the region also includes Buka Island and a number of outlying islands and atolls. The interim capital is Buka, though it is expected that major government services and buildings will be moved to Arawa, following reconstruction.

Bougainville Island Main island of the Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

Bougainville Island is the main island of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, which is part of Papua New Guinea. It was previously the main landmass in the German Empire-associated North Solomons. Its land area is 9,300 km2 (3,600 sq mi). The population of the whole province, including nearby islets such as the Carterets, is approximately 300,000. The highest point is Mount Balbi, on the main island, at 2,715 m (8,907 ft). The much-smaller Buka Island, c. 500 km2 (190 sq mi), lies to the north, across the 400–500 m (1,300–1,600 ft) wide Buka Strait. Even though the strait is narrow, there is no bridge across it. But there is a regular ferry service between the key settlements on either side. The main airport in the north is in the town of Buka.

History of Bougainville

Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea (PNG), has been inhabited by humans for at least 29,000 years, according to artefacts found in Kilu Cave on Buka Island. The region is named after Bougainville Island, the largest island of the Solomon Islands archipelago, but also contains a number of smaller islands.

Joseph Canisius Kabui was a secessionist leader and the first President of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, off the coast of Papua New Guinea, from 2005 to 2008. He was also the leader of the Bougainville People's Congress.

Flag of Bougainville

The Flag of Bougainville is a symbol of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. It was originally adopted in 1975 by the secessionist Republic of North Solomons.

Buka, Papua New Guinea Town in Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

Buka is located on the southern coast of Buka Island, in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, in eastern Papua New Guinea. It is administered under Buka Rural LLG.

Arawa, Bougainville Place in Autonomous Region of Bougainville, Papua New Guinea

Arawa is the largest town and the former capital of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville in Papua New Guinea. It is administered under Arawa Rural LLG.

Peter Sobby Tsiamalili was the Papua New Guinean civil servant who served as the first chief administrator of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville (ABG) following successful elections in June 2005. Tsiamalili also served as a diplomat and ambassador representing Papua New Guinea abroad in Fiji and Belgium.

James Tanis is a politician in Papua New Guinea who was elected President of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville in 2008 following the death of Joseph Kabui while in office, serving the remainder of the term from 2009 to 2010. He was previously the Vice President of the Bougainville People's Congress.

Ezekiel Massat is a Bougainvillean lawyer and politician. Massat was appointed the Vice President of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville by President James Tanis on January 19, 2009. Bougainville is an autonomous region within Papua New Guinea.

Buin, Papua New Guinea

Buin is a town on Bougainville Island, and the capital of the South Bougainville District, in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville, in eastern Papua New Guinea. The island is in the northern Solomon Islands Archipelago of the Melanesia region, in the South Pacific Ocean.

2010 Bougainvillean presidential election

The Bougainvillean presidential election of 2010 was held in Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea. The presidential contest was part of the overall general election on the island. Voting began on May 7, 2010, and ended May 24, 2010. Final results for the election were announced on June 8, 2010.

Bougainville conflict 1988–1998 armed conflict in Papua New Guinea

The Bougainville conflict, also known as the Bougainville Civil War, was a multi-layered armed conflict fought from 1988 to 1998 in the North Solomons Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG) between PNG and the secessionist forces of the Bougainville Revolutionary Army (BRA), and between the BRA and other armed groups on Bougainville. The conflict was described by Bougainvillean President John Momis as the largest conflict in Oceania since the end of World War II in 1945, with an estimated 15,000–20,000 Bougainvilleans dead, although lower estimates place the toll at around 1,000–2,000.

Joe Lera is a Papua New Guinean politician. He has been a United Resources Party member of the National Parliament of Papua New Guinea since 2012, representing the Bougainville Regional seat. Although regional members generally assume the position of Governor, due to the existence of the devolved Autonomous Bougainville Government Lera is referred to as the "Regional Member for Bougainville". He has been the Minister for Bougainville Affairs in the government of Peter O'Neill since April 2016.

2019 Bougainvillean independence referendum Bougainvilles referendum for independence from Papua New Guinea

A non-binding independence referendum was held in Bougainville, an autonomous region of Papua New Guinea, between 23 November and 7 December 2019. The referendum question was a choice between greater autonomy within Papua New Guinea and full independence; voters voted overwhelmingly (98.31%) for independence.

Events in Oceania, during 2019.

COVID-19 pandemic in Oceania Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Oceania

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached Oceania on 25 January 2020 with the first confirmed case reported in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It has since spread elsewhere in the region, although many small Pacific island nations have thus far avoided the outbreak by closing their international borders. Five Oceania sovereign states have yet to report a case: Kiribati, Nauru, Palau, Tonga, and Tuvalu. Australia and New Zealand have been praised for their handling of the pandemic compared to other western nations, with both New Zealand and each of Australia's states wiping out all community transmission of the virus several times even after being re-introduced into the community. The most recent country or territory to report its first confirmed case was the Federated States of Micronesia on 8 January 2021.

COVID-19 pandemic in Papua New Guinea Ongoing COVID-19 viral pandemic in Papua New Guinea

The COVID-19 pandemic in Papua New Guinea is part of the worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The virus was confirmed to have reached Papua New Guinea on 20 March 2020. On 4 May, Papua New Guinea was declared COVID-19 free. However, on 20 June, the government confirmed another case of COVID-19, meaning that the disease is now present again within the country.

The COVID-19 pandemic was confirmed to have reached the unincorporated United States territory of American Samoa on 9 November 2020.

2020 Bougainvillean general election Election

The 2020 presidential and parliamentary election was held in the Autonomous Region of Bougainville between 12 August and 1 September 2020. 440 candidates were contesting the 40 seats in the Bougainville House of Representatives, including 25 competing to be President of the Autonomous Region of Bougainville. The new government will negotiate the outcome of the 2019 Bougainvillean independence referendum, which saw 98.3% of voters supporting independence from Papua New Guinea.

References

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  5. Reynolds, Matt (4 March 2020). "What is coronavirus and how close is it to becoming a pandemic?". Wired UK. ISSN   1357-0978. Archived from the original on 5 March 2020. Retrieved 5 March 2020.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 "Bougainville limits flights again as PNG wrestles with Covid-19". Radio New Zealand International . 2020-08-01. Retrieved 2020-08-12.Check |archive-url= value (help)
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  8. "Bougainville Speaker infected with Covid-19". Radio New Zealand International . 2021-03-23. Archived from the original on 2021-03-24. Retrieved 2021-03-28.