COVID-19 vaccination in Quebec

Last updated
COVID-19 vaccination in Quebec
DateDecember 14, 2020 (2020-12-14) – present
Location Quebec
Also known asCampagne de vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Québec (French)
Cause COVID-19 pandemic in Quebec
Organized by- Health Canada
- Public Health Agency of Canada
- Quebec government
- Municipal government in Canada
Participants13,472,496 doses administered (November 22, 2021) [1]
6,492,517 second doses administered (November 22, 2021) [1]
Outcome79.8% of the population has received at least one dose of a vaccine (November 22, 2021) [1]
91.1% of the population ≥12 years old is "adequately vaccinated" [lower-alpha 1] (November 22, 2021) [1]
Website Government of Quebec

The COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Quebec (French : Campagne de vaccination contre la Covid-19 au Québec) is an ongoing provincial effort to distribute and administer the vaccine against COVID-19.

Contents

Quebec received their first shipments of COVID-19 vaccines on December 13, 2020. [2] Priority vaccination of long-term care home residents and healthcare workers began the next day, with an 89-year-old resident of a long-term care home in Quebec City being the first in the province and country to receive a vaccine. [3] On March 1, 2021, vaccination of the general population began, starting with people 80 years of age or older in Montreal. [4] Over the course of the next three months, the vaccination campaign was gradually expanded to each age group in descending order. By May 14, all adults in Quebec were able to book a vaccination appointment, [5] and by June 6, 75% of eligible Quebecers had received at least one dose of a vaccine. [6] On September 1, 2021, a vaccine passport came into effect for restaurants, bars, and gyms, among others. [7]

Vaccination against COVID-19 is not mandatory in Quebec and the vaccines are free of charge for those who choose to get it. [8]

Timeline

Total number of people receiving vaccinations in Quebec as of November 22, 2021

  Unvaccinated population: ~1,734,275 people (20.2%)
  Population who has received only one dose of a vaccine: 358,730 people (4.2%)
  Population who has been fully vaccinated (both doses): 6,492,517 people (75.6%)

Preparation

In the autumn of 2020, logistical preparations for the rollout of the vaccine began to be developed. Since Quebec would be receiving vaccine doses from the federal government, the Quebec government began to study several scenarios based on the quantity and type of vaccine received. [9] The city of Montreal, in particular, set to work on creating its own plan and administrative structures for the vaccination campaign in late November 2020. [10]

At the end of November 2020, the director of the Quebec vaccination campaign against COVID-19 was chosen: Jérôme Gagnon, an assistant deputy minister. [11] After undergoing health problems, he was replaced two weeks later by Daniel Paré, CEO of the Chaudière-Appalaches Centre intégré de santé et de services sociaux. [12]

In early December, in addition to health professionals who are already authorized to administer vaccines, the Quebec government added new categories of people who are authorized to administer the vaccine: [13]

  1. Students in programs that lead to a diploma in which they would be authorized to administer vaccines;
  2. Ambulance technicians and students training to be ambulance technicians;
  3. Holders of a medical degree from outside Canada;
  4. Professionals in physical health, once they have undergone some training, including acupuncturists, audiologists, chiropractors, etc.

On December 10, Premier François Legault indicated that by January 4, 2021, Quebec would receive 55,000 doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine. [14]

Initial launch

On December 13, not even a week after its approval by Health Canada, [15] the first shipment of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines arrived in Canada at Mirabel airport. [2] Vaccination in Quebec started the next day, on December 14, with Gisèle Levesque, an 89-year-old resident of a long-term care home in Quebec City, being the first in the province and country to receive a vaccine. [3] [16] The vaccination campaign was slow to start, with around 1,400 doses being given per day in the first two weeks for a total of less than 20,000 people vaccinated. [17]

On December 23, Health Canada approved the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine [18] and on December 30, Quebec received their first shipment. Due to its lower maintenance requirements in comparison to the Pfizer vaccine, the Moderna vaccine was initially prioritized for use in remote regions. [19]

In the last week of January 2021, Quebec did not receive any vaccine doses, as Pfizer had temporarily stopped deliveries to Canada while its factory was being retooled. [20] [21]

COVID-19 vaccines on order in Canada ()
VaccineProgressDoses orderedApprovalDeployment
Pfizer–BioNTech phase III clinical trials51-76 million [22] [23] [24] Green check.svg 9 December 2020 [25] Green check.svg 14 December 2020
Moderna phase III clinical trials44 million [26] Green check.svg 23 December 2020 [27] Green check.svg 31 December 2020
Oxford–AstraZeneca phase III clinical trials23.9 million [28] Green check.svg 26 February 2021 [29] Green check.svg 10 March 2021 [30]
Janssen (Johnson & Johnson)phase III clinical trials10-38 millionGreen check.svg 5 March 2021 [31] Green check.svg 12 November 2021 [32]
Novavax phase III clinical trialsup to 76 millionPendingPending
Medicago phase III clinical trials [33] up to 76 millionPendingPending
Sanofi–GSK phase III clinical trialsup to 72 millionPendingPending


Expansion

On February 23, Premier Legault announced that vaccine reservations would become available on February 25 by phone or online for Quebecers aged 85 and older. [34] [35]

On March 1, vaccination of the general population began, starting with people 80 years of age or older in Montreal. [36] The next day, Minister Christian Dubé confirmed that 350 pharmacies in Montreal would begin taking appointments for vaccinations on March 15. The Director of the Vaccination Campaign Against COVID-19 in Quebec (French : directeur de la campagne de vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Québec), Daniel Paré, revealed that since February 25, there had been over 350,000 vaccination reservations made online. [37]

By March 10, all Quebecers 70 years of age and older were able to book a vaccination appointment. [38]

On March 16, Premier Legault promised that by June 24 (Quebec's national holiday) all Quebecers who wish to be vaccinated would have at least their first dose. [39]

By March 18, over 10% of the Quebec population had received at least one dose. [1]

On March 22, pharmacies began administering shots. [40]

On March 26, Premier Legault received a dose of the Pfizer vaccine. [41]

On March 29, Canada's National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) recommended that use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine be suspended for patients below the age of 55, as the risk of blood clots seemed to be higher in younger people. [42] As a precautionary measure, the Quebec government modified their strategy to comply with the new recommendations. [43]

Vaccination centre at Montreal's Olympic Stadium Vaccination Montreal Covid 19.jpg
Vaccination centre at Montreal's Olympic Stadium

By April 8, all Quebecers 60 years of age and older were able to book a vaccination appointment. [44]

By April 14, 25% of Quebecers had received at least one dose. [1]

On April 21, the minimum age for the AstraZeneca vaccine was lowered to 45 years old. [45] Despite concerns of vaccine hesistancy stemming from reports of rare blood clots linked to the AstraZeneca vaccine, which has led to slowed demand for the AstraZeneca vaccine in some other provinces, [46] [47] long line-ups started to form before dawn at drop-in vaccation sites. [48] In Montreal, all available AstraZeneca doses were exhausted within two days, forcing the drop-in vaccination clinics to close. [49] [50]

In the last week of April, two more priority groups became able to get vaccinated: people with a chronic illness or underlying health condition that increases their risk of COVID-19 complications, [51] and people with physical or intellectual disabilities, including those on the autism spectrum. This would allow for around 550,000 more people to get vaccinated. [52] [53]

On April 27, businesses with enough capacity began opening up their facilities for mass vaccination, with Montreal-based CAE Inc. being the first to do so. [54] The same day, Quebec reported its first death from an adverse event following immunization — a 54-year-old woman from Montérégie who died of a thrombosis after receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine. [55]

On April 28, pregnant women became able to get vaccinated with one of the approved mRNA vaccines (Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna). [56] [57]

On April 29, the Quebec government announced its vaccine schedule for adults under 60 years old, who will be divided into seven groups spanning about five years, with vaccination of the final group beginning on May 14. [58]

On May 4, Quebec announced its first drive-thru vaccination clinic, located at the Pierre Elliot Trudeau International Airport in Montreal. It is slated for opening on May 17 and will be able to administer 4,000 doses per day once operational. [59]

On May 10, Marguerite Blais, the Minister Responsible for Seniors, announced that all CHSLD residents who had received a first dose of the vaccine have now been fully vaccinated with both doses. [60]

On May 13, the Quebec government announced the suspension of the AstraZeneca vaccine for first doses, citing the risk of post-vaccination embolic and thrombotic events in the current context of readily available mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna), which do not seem to pose the same risk. The move came after several other provinces, including Ontario and Alberta, announced similar suspensions. Consequently, the 148,000 doses of AstraZeneca arriving in the next week will be used as second doses for those over the age of 45 who have received the AstraZeneca vaccine as their first dose. However, for those under the age of 45, the CIQ recommends giving an mRNA vaccine as the second dose. [61] [62]

By May 14, the vaccination campaign had expanded to all adults in Quebec. [58]

By May 19, 50% of Quebecers had received at least one dose. [1] The same day, Minister Dubé and Mayor Valérie Plante announced the opening of a vaccination clinic at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve that will welcome both vehicles and cyclists, in light of the cancellation of the 2021 Canadian Grand Prix. [63]

On May 21, the vaccination campaign was expanded to children aged 12 to 17 years old. [64]

Acceleration of second doses

On May 27, Minister Dubé announced that the interval between the first and second dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine will be shortened to 8 weeks, as opposed to 16 weeks, following new recommendations from the CIQ. Consequently, anyone who had gotten their first dose before April 3 could now get their second dose. [65] In the next few days, some drop-in vaccination centres were overwhelmed with people seeking their second dose of AstraZeneca, resulting in many people having to be turned away. [66] Soon after, the minimum interval between the first and second doses for all vaccines was reduced to 8 weeks. As such, those in the 80-year-old and older age group were able to move up their appointment for their second dose starting on June 7. Over the next few weeks, all other age groups — except the 12 to 17 age group, who has to wait for the approval of public health — gradually became able to advance their second dose appointments. [67]

By June 6, over 75% of Quebecers aged 12 and up had received at least one dose of a vaccine. [1] At about this point, the administration of first doses began to slow down, and on June 9, for the first time, more second doses were administered in one day than first doses. By the end of June, approximately 90% of all doses administered were second doses. Accordingly, the percentage of Quebecers having received at least one dose of a vaccine began to stabilize, largely due to comparatively lower vaccine uptake among people in the 18 to 29 age group. [1]

On July 8, Minister Dubé announced that a vaccine passport in the form of a QR code will be instituted in September 2021. It will only be used in exceptional circumstances, such as an outbreak of COVID-19 in a high-risk setting, and will never be used for essential services. [68]

On July 15, people in the 12 to 17 year old age group became able to advance their appointment for their second dose by four weeks. [69]

In an attempt to entice the remaining 17% of eligible Quebecers to get vaccinated, on July 16, Minister Dubé announced that people over 18 who have been vaccinated can enter into a cash lottery starting on July 25. There will be four prizes worth $150,000 each and one prize worth $1 million. For those between the ages of 12 and 17, they can enter into a contest for bursaries. There will be eight bursaries worth $10,000 each and 16 worth $20,000. The draws will occur weekly starting on August 6, 2021 and ending on September 3, 2021, on which date the draw for the largest cash prize of $1 million will take place. [70]

On July 24, the Quebec government confirmed that people who have received a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine and a second dose of an mRNA vaccine can receive a third dose of an mRNA vaccine if needed for travel. [71]

Vaccine passports and vaccine mandates

On August 5, due to a rise in cases, Premier Legault confirmed that a vaccine passport will soon be implemented for certain non-essential services, so as to avoid another partial lockdown. [72] The next week, Minister Dubé specified that the vaccine passport will come into effect on September 1, 2021, and will be used for gaining access to restaurants, bars, and gyms, among other non-essential services. [73]

By August 15, over 75% of Quebecers aged 12 and up were adequately vaccinated, meaning that they had either received two doses of a vaccine or one dose of a vaccine if they had already had COVID-19. [1]

Vial of the Moderna vaccine (10 doses of 0.5 mL) administered in a Quebec pharmacy Fiole de vaccin Moderna (10 doses).jpg
Vial of the Moderna vaccine (10 doses of 0.5 mL) administered in a Quebec pharmacy

In late August, with about 90% of healthcare workers fully vaccinated, the Quebec government announced that healthcare workers in Quebec, both in the private sector and the public sector, will have to be fully vaccinated by October 15, 2021. [74] Workers who do not comply will be suspended without pay or reassigned to other duties, if possible. [75] Some healthcare unions expressed concern about the impact this decision would have on the shortage of nurses and healthcare personnel in the province; around 22,000 healthcare professionals would be at risk of suspension. [76]

On September 1, 2021, the vaccine passport came into effect. The system would require certain non-essential services to use an app to scan clients' proof-of-vaccination QR codes before entering, so as to ensure that they have been fully vaccinated for at least one week. [77] [78] To allow for a smooth transition, a grace period in which no fines would be given was permitted for the first two weeks. [79]

On October 7, a week before the deadline for healthcare workers to be fully vaccinated, Minister Dubé announced that no religious exemptions would be permitted for unvaccinated healthcare workers. [80]

Following a recommendation from Minister Dubé on October 8, [81] several provincial medical orders, including the Order of Nurses, the College of Physicians, and the Order of Pharmacists, [82] announced on October 12 that members who are still unvaccinated by October 15 will have their licence to practise suspended. However, their licence will be reinstated upon full vaccination. [83] The same day, it was revealed that a court challenge would be brought forth against the policy, with lawyer Natalia Manole arguing that the staff shortages resulting from the policy would cause more public harm than keeping unvaccinated personnel, who make up only 7% of healthcare workers. In response, Minister Dubé affirmed that mandatory vaccination of healthcare workers is "the only solution" and that the government will be "very firm". [84] The next day, on October 13, Minister Dubé announced that the deadline for healthcare workers to get vaccinated would be postponed by a month to November 15, citing the possibility of a major reduction in health services due to staff shortages. However, nurses who remain unvaccinated will not be eligible for financial bonuses, which were promised by the Quebec government a few weeks earlier with the goal of attracting and retaining more nurses. Additionally, they will have to get tested for COVID-19 at least three times a week. Dubé also noted that only adequately vaccinated people will be able to be hired as healthcare workers. [85]

By October 13, over 90% of Quebecers aged 12 and up had received at least one dose of a vaccine. [1]

On October 18, the Quebec government stopped allowing unvaccinated healthcare workers to be tested for COVID-19 — which they are required to do at least three times a week — during their work hours. [86]

On November 3, the vaccine mandate for healthcare workers, which was set to come into effect on November 15, was cancelled. However, newly hired healthcare workers must be fully vaccinated. [87]

Following a recommendation from the CIQ, Minister Dubé announced on November 9 that people 70 years of age and older would be able to receive a third dose of a vaccine once six months have elapsed since their second dose. [88]

Dosing

Towards the end of December 2020, the Quebec government set aside 27,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine in order to be able to administer second doses without delay, with Minister Dubé saying that this was a requirement from Pfizer. However, he added that he was in discussion with Quebec's public health agency, as well as with other provinces, to determine whether it would be possible to "force the hand of Pfizer in order to free up these doses" and be able to vaccinate more people. [89]

In January 2021, the province announced its intentions to switch to a first-dose priority system, which would allow for the greatest number of people to receive a first dose but which would delay administration of a second-dose to months after the first, as opposed to the three weeks recommended by Pfizer. [90] The Quebec government initially received criticism for this, with Supriya Sharma, Canada's Chief Medical Advisor to the Deputy Minister, stating that Quebec's calculations were done in a superficial manner and that this decision could have an effect on the delivery schedule for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. [91] Indeed, on January 11, 2021, Premier Legault suggested that Pfizer might stop delivering vaccines to Quebec if the province did not comply with the recommended schedule. However, he affirmed that if such a situation arose, Quebec would modify its strategy to adhere to the recommended schedule. [92]

In March, NACI modified its recommendations, confirming that the second dose can be administered up to four months after the first, [93] [94] prompting other provinces, including British Columbia and Ontario, to start following the same strategy as Quebec. Given the recommendations, long-term care centre (French : centre d'hébergement et de soins de longue durée) residents and staff, who had begun to receive vaccinations in December of 2020, started receiving their second doses in early March 2021. [95] However, due to shipment delays of the Moderna vaccine, some residents who had received the Moderna vaccine as their first dose were administered a different vaccine for their second dose. [96] While the Comité sur l’immunisation du Québec (CIQ), a branch of the Institut national de santé publique du Québec (INSPQ), recommended that both doses be given using the same vaccine, as there was a lack of data regarding the efficacy of mixing vaccines, they allowed for flexibility in the context of a vaccine supply shortage. The CIQ thus suggested that in order to not delay the administration of a second dose any longer than necessary, a vaccine of a similar type to the first can be administered as the second (for example, a Moderna vaccine can be replaced with a Pfizer vaccine, since they are both mRNA vaccines). [97] Later that month, the CIQ widened its policy on interchanging vaccines, allowing for people under the age of 45 who received a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine, a viral vector vaccine, to receive a second dose of an mRNA vaccine. On June 15, the CIQ expanded this policy to Quebecers of all eligible ages. [98]

Towards the beginning of June, the interval between the first and second dose was reduced from 16 weeks to 8 weeks. [67] [65] In July, the interval was reduced to four weeks. [99]

Third doses

On August 30, 2021, the Quebec government announced that it will offer third doses to immunosuppressed people. [100]

Following new recommendations from the CIQ, Minister Dubé announced on September 28 that seniors living in long-term care homes will be able to receive a third dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) once 6 months have passed since their second dose. [101] [102] A little over a month later, the booster shot program was expanded to people in the general public who are 70 years of age and older. [88]

Priority groups

Official government categories

Sign at a vaccination site entrance in Montreal Panneau site de vaccination Covid-19 Montreal.jpg
Sign at a vaccination site entrance in Montreal

In November 2020, the CIQ was asked to come up with a preliminary evaluation of which groups should be prioritized for vaccination. [103] [104] Given the limited availability of vaccines, the CIQ based their evaluation on five values:

  1. Beneficence
  2. Equity
  3. Justice
  4. Reciprocity
  5. Non-maleficence

Based on these values, they proposed the following priority groups, in order of highest priority to lowest: [104] [lower-alpha 2]

Priority vaccination groups in Quebec
Priority groupDescriptionStart date
1Vulnerable people and people with a significant loss of autonomy who live in residential and long-term care centres (CHSLDs) or in intermediate and family-type resources (RI‑RTFs).December 14, 2020 [105]
2Workers in the health and social services network who have contact with users.December 14, 2020 [106]
3Autonomous or semi-autonomous people who live in private seniors' homes (RPAs) or in certain closed residential facilities for older adults.December 15, 2020 [1]
4Isolated and remote communities.January 6, 2021 [107] [108]
5People 80 years of age or older.March 1, 2021 [109]
6People 70 to 79 years of age.March 1, 2021 [109]
7People 60 to 69 years of age.March 22, 2021 [110]
8Adults under 60 years of age who have a chronic disease or health problem that increases the risk of complications of COVID‑19: [111] [112]
  • People who are currently hospitalized with a condition that puts them at risk for complications from COVID-19.
  • People who require dialysis for kidney failure, grafting, cancer treatment, or some types of organ transplants.
  • People who must receive a vaccine under the supervision of an allergy specialist in a hospital setting.
April 14, 2021
Adults under 60 years of age who have a chronic disease or health problem that increases the risk of complications of COVID‑19, including but not limited to: [113] April 23, 2021
Adults under 60 years of age who have a chronic disease or health problem that increases the risk of complications of COVID‑19, including but not limited to:
  • People with a mobility or physical disability.
  • People with an intellectual disability (including speech, visual, and auditory disabilities).
  • People on the autism spectrum.
April 26, 2021 [52]
9Adults under 60 years of age who provide essential services and have contact with users.April 14, 2021 [111]
10People 50 to 59 years of age.April 30, 2021 [114]
People 45 to 49 years of age.May 3, 2021 [114]
People 40 to 44 years of age.May 5, 2021 [114]
People 35 to 39 years of age.May 7, 2021 [114]
People 30 to 34 years of age.May 10, 2021 [114]
People 25 to 29 years of age.May 12, 2021 [114]
People 18 to 24 years of age.May 14, 2021 [114]
People 12 to 17 years of age.May 21, 2021 [64]

Further vaccine trial data is required before the Quebec government can decide whether or when to vaccinate children under the age of 12.

Other categories

Initially, in accordance with the precautionary principle, Quebec did not allow for the vaccination of pregnant women. However, in April 2021, calls for the vaccination of pregnant women, including from the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, began to increase. [115] Many gynecologists argued that pregnant women should be prioritized, as they are more likely to experience severe health complications after contracting COVID-19. They pointed to the situation in Toronto, where more than half of patients in intensive care in some hospitals were pregnant women. [116] In light of these recommendations, the Quebec government modified its position on April 28, allowing pregnant women to be vaccinated. [117]

According to some experts, Indigenous Canadians and prisoners should be considered as priority groups. [118]

Graphs

Daily doses

Total doses

Percentage of the population vaccinated

See also

Notes

  1. The Quebec government defines an "adequately vaccinated" person as someone who has either received two doses of a vaccine or one dose of a vaccine if they have already had COVID-19
  2. Categories are not mutually exclusive

Related Research Articles

Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine Viral vector vaccine for prevention of COVID-19 by Oxford University and AstraZeneca

The Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, codenamed AZD1222, and sold under the brand names Covishield and Vaxzevria among others, is a viral vector vaccine for prevention of COVID-19. Developed in the United Kingdom by the Oxford University and British-Swedish company AstraZeneca, using as a vector the modified chimpanzee adenovirus ChAdOx1. The vaccine is given by intramuscular injection. Studies carried out in 2020 showed that the efficacy of the vaccine is 76.0% at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 beginning at 22 days following the first dose, and 81.3% after the second dose. A study in Scotland found that, for symptomatic COVID-19 infection after the second dose, the vaccine is 81% effective against the Alpha variant, and 61% against the Delta variant.

COVID-19 vaccination in Switzerland Plan to immunize against COVID-19

COVID-19 vaccination in Switzerland is an ongoing immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country.

The COVID-19 vaccination program in the Philippines is an ongoing mass immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country.

COVID-19 vaccination in Sweden

Vaccination against COVID-19 in Sweden started on 27 December 2020 after the approval of the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine by the European Commission. In Sweden, the Public Health Agency has been commissioned by the government to create a vaccination plan. Sveriges riksbank, the central bank of Sweden, predicts that efficient vaccination against COVID-19 has macroeconomic benefits. As of 1 September 2021, 82.0% of adults in Sweden have received at least one dose, with a total of 12,700,896 administered.

COVID-19 vaccination in Italy Immunization plan against COVID-19 in Italy

The COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Italy is a mass immunization campaign that was put in place by the Italian government in order to respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It started on 27 December 2020, together with most countries in the European Union.

COVID-19 vaccination in Australia Ongoing COVID-19 vaccine program in Australia

The general COVID-19 vaccination in Australia program began on 22 February 2021 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and will continue with the goal of vaccinating all willing Australians before 2022. Front-line workers and aged care staff and residents will be the first Australians to be inoculated, before a gradual phased release to less-vulnerable and lower-risk population groups throughout 2021. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) approved four vaccines for Australian use in 2021: the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine on 25 January, the Oxford–AstraZeneca vaccine on 16 February, Janssen vaccine on 25 June and the Moderna vaccine on 9 August. Although approved for use, the Janssen vaccine is not included in the Australian vaccination program.

COVID-19 vaccination in France

COVID-19 vaccination in France started on 27 December 2020 after the approval of Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine by the European Union commission.

COVID-19 vaccination in Romania started on 27 December 2020. It was announced that the process would be divided into three phases. Medical personnel would be vaccinated first, followed by the population at risk, and finally by the rest of the population. Vaccination was declared free and non-mandatory. As of May 2021, four types of vaccines were authorized to be used in Romania. This is the largest vaccination campaign in the modern history of Romania.

COVID-19 vaccination in Albania

The COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Albania is a mass immunization campaign that was put in place by the Albanian authorities in order to respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. It started on 11 January 2021.

The following is a timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in the province of Quebec.

COVID-19 vaccination in Canada COVID-19 vaccination programme in Canada

COVID-19 vaccination in Canada is an ongoing, intergovernmental effort coordinated between the bodies responsible in the Government of Canada to acquire and distribute vaccines to individual provincial and territorial governments who in turn administer authorized COVID-19 vaccines during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. Provinces have worked with local municipal governments, hospital systems, family doctors and independently owned pharmacies to aid in part, or in full with vaccination rollout. The vaccination effort in full is the largest such immunization effort in the nation's history. The vaccination effort began December 14, 2020 and is currently ongoing.

COVID-19 vaccination in Moldova started on 2 March 2021. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Moldova was very reliant on external help from other countries, having received donations of vaccines from Romania, the United Arab Emirates, Russia and China. In fact, Moldova's vaccination campaign started due to a donation from Romania on 27 February 2021 composed of 21,600 Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine doses, with the first vaccinated person in the country being Alexandru Botizatu. Romania had promised earlier, on 29 December 2020, that it would help Moldova with a collaboration project which would include 200,000 vaccine doses to help Moldova combat the pandemic, but also other matters of the country. Romania subsequently made more donations on 27 March 2021 with 50,400 vaccine units; on 17 April 2021 with 132,000 vaccine doses, fulfilling its promise to Moldova; and on 7 May 2021 with 100,800 vaccine units even though this surpassed the promised 200,000 vaccine doses.

COVID-19 vaccination in Botswana is an ongoing immunisation campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country.

The COVID-19 vaccination program in Colombia is an ongoing effort of mass immunization put in place by the Colombian government in order to respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 virus was confirmed to have reached Colombia on 6 March 2020. Colombia's preparation and readiness for a vaccine program allowed it to join the first group of countries who received vaccines through COVAX. The first vaccine in Colombia was given to a nurse on 17 February 2021.

COVID-19 vaccination in Africa Immunisation programme against COVID-19 in Africa

COVID-19 vaccination programs have begun in many countries and territories in Africa. As of 5 July 2021, vaccination campaigns had started in 51 African countries with 36.5 million people receiving at least one dose.

The National Advisory Committee on Immunization is an advisory body that provides the Government of Canada with medical and scientific advice relating to human immunization.

COVID-19 vaccination in Mexico Plan to immunize against COVID-19

COVID-19 vaccination in Mexico is an ongoing immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country.

COVID-19 vaccination in Indonesia

The COVID-19 vaccination in Indonesia is an ongoing mass immunization in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Indonesia. On 13 January 2021, the program commenced when President Joko Widodo was vaccinated at the presidential palace. In terms of total doses given, Indonesia ranks fifth in the world and second in Asia.

COVID-19 vaccination in Taiwan Plan to immunize against COVID-19

COVID-19 vaccination in Taiwan is an ongoing immunization campaign against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), in response to the ongoing pandemic in the country. Following the approval of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine on 18 March 2021, vaccinations commenced on 22 March 2021, and will continue throughout the year with the goal of vaccinating 70% of the population by late October 2021.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 "Données de vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Québec". INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement. Retrieved 2021-03-19.
  2. 1 2 Radio-Canada (2020-12-13). "Les premières doses du vaccin contre la COVID-19 sont arrivées au Canada". Radio-Canada. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  3. 1 2 Forani, Jonathan; Aiello, Rachel (2020-12-14). "'V-Day': First COVID-19 vaccines administered in Canada". CTV News. Archived from the original on 2021-01-05. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  4. Messier, François (2021-03-01). "C'est parti pour la vaccination de masse à Montréal" (in French). Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 2021-03-01. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  5. Shingler, Benjamin; Montpetit, Jonathan (2021-04-29). "Quebec is making COVID-19 vaccines available to the general population. Here's how it will work". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  6. "Ligne du temps COVID-19 au Québec". INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement du Québec.
  7. Cabrera, Holly; Olson, Isaac (2021-08-05). "Facing onset of 4th wave of COVID-19 infections, Quebec to implement vaccine passport system". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-08-29.
  8. "Progress of the COVID-19 vaccination". Gouvernement du Québec. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  9. Bélair-Cirino, Marco; Riopel, Alexis; Cousineau, Marie-Eve (25 November 2020). "Des millions de Québécois à vacciner". Le Devoir. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  10. Riopel, Alexis (25 November 2020). "Vaccination: Montréal en attente de détails du provincial et du fédéral". Le Devoir. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  11. Larin, Vincent (2020-11-26). "COVID-19: Québec désigne son «général» pour l'opération de vaccination". Le Journal de Québec. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  12. Morrissette-Beaulieu, Félix (2020-12-08). "Changement de garde à la tête de la campagne de vaccination québécoise". Radio-Canada. Retrieved 2021-03-23.
  13. Presse, La (2020-12-04). "Vaccination au Québec: Des étudiants et des professionnels de la santé en renfort". La Presse. Retrieved 2021-03-24.
  14. "Conférence de presse de M. François Legault, premier ministre". Assemblée Nationale du Québec. Gouvernement du Québec. 2020-12-10. Archived from the original on 2021-01-08. Retrieved 2021-01-08. We know that we'll get 57,000 boxes, which means 55,000 doses, before January 4th
  15. "Authorization of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine with English-only Carton and Vial Labels". Recalls and safety alerts. The Government of Canada. 2020-12-12. Archived from the original on 2020-12-12. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  16. Morrissette-Beaulieu, Félix (2020-12-14). "COVID-19 : Gisèle Lévesque devient la première personne vaccinée au Canada". Radio-Canada. Retrieved 2021-03-24.
  17. Proulx, Boris; Crête, Mylène (2020-12-29). "Lent décollage pour la vaccination au Québec". Le Devoir (in French). Retrieved 2021-04-21.
  18. "Authorization of Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine with English-only Vial and Carton Labels". Recalls & alerts. The Government of Canada. 2020-12-23. Archived from the original on 2021-01-05. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  19. "Quebec receives first shipment of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine". CBC News. 2020-12-31. Archived from the original on 2021-01-03. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  20. "Données sur la COVID-19 au Québec".
  21. Tasker, John Paul (2021-01-21). "Canada won't receive any Pfizer shots next week — here's what you need to know about the vaccination campaign". CBC News. Archived from the original on 2021-01-21. Retrieved 2021-01-30.
  22. Turnbull, Sarah (June 4, 2021). "Feds confirm 9M Pfizer doses arriving in August, option for 3M in September". CTV News. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  23. Jones, Ryan Patrick (January 12, 2021). "Government secures another 20M COVID-19 vaccine doses from Pfizer". CBC News. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  24. "Procuring vaccines for COVID-19". Government of Canada. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  25. Rabson, Mia (December 9, 2020). "Health Canada approves Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine". The Star. The Canadian Press.
  26. Moderna (February 12, 2021). "Canada Purchases Additional 4 Million Doses of Moderna's COVID-19 Vaccine" (Press release) via Business Wire.
  27. "Shipment of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine arrives in Canada one day after approval". CBC News. December 24, 2020. Retrieved February 18, 2021.
  28. Forani, Jonathan (February 26, 2021). "Health Canada approves two AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines". CTV News.
  29. Tasker, John Paul (February 26, 2021). "Health Canada approves AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine". CBC News. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  30. Loblaw Companies Limited (March 10, 2021). "Shoppers Drug Mart marks historic COVID-19 milestone with first vaccine in pharmacy in Ontario" (Press release). Retrieved March 22, 2021 via Newswire.
  31. Zimonjic, Peter (September 17, 2020). "Drug and vaccine authorizations for COVID-19: List of authorized drugs, vaccines and expanded indications March 3, 2021". Government of Canada. Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  32. Bourne, Kirby (12 November 2021). "Alberta receives 5K doses of Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, confirms 841 new cases over 2 days". Global News . Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  33. Medicago GSK (March 16, 2021). "Medicago and GSK start Phase 3 trial of adjuvanted COVID-19 vaccine candidate" (Press release). Retrieved March 22, 2021.
  34. "COVID-19 vaccination campaign". Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original on 2021-02-24. Retrieved 2021-02-24.
  35. Gordon, Sean (2021-02-24). "Elderly Quebecers keen to take their turn in COVID-19 vaccination queue but push for more details on process". CBC News. Archived from the original on 2021-02-24. Retrieved 2021-02-24.
  36. Messier, François (2021-03-01). "C'est parti pour la vaccination de masse à Montréal" (in French). Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 2021-03-01. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  37. "Vaccination contre la COVID-19 dans les pharmacies du Québec dès le 15 mars – 2 mars 2021" (video). cpac (in French). YouTube. 2021-03-02. Retrieved 2021-03-05.
  38. Laframboise, Kalina (2021-03-10). "What you need to know as COVID-19 vaccination registration now available to Quebecers aged 70 and up". Global News. Archived from the original on 2021-03-12. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  39. Labbé, Jérôme (2021-03-16). "Québec repousse le couvre-feu à 21 h 30 en zone rouge" (in French). Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 2021-03-17. Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  40. Fahmy, Gabrielle (2021-03-22). "Vaccines in comfort: rave reviews as Quebec pharmacies start giving COVID shots". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-04-27.
  41. "'We're seeing the beginning of a third wave' of COVID-19, says Legault, as he receives his vaccine". CTV News. 2021-03-26. Retrieved 2021-04-18.
  42. "NACI to recommend halting AstraZeneca vaccine for those under 55: source". CTV News. 29 March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  43. Montpetit, Jonathan (2021-03-29). "Quebec suspends giving doses of AstraZeneca to those under 55, though no issues reported in Canada". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-04-20.
  44. "Here are the latest groups to be eligible for COVID-19 vaccination in Quebec". Montreal Gazette. 2021-04-07. Retrieved 2021-04-17.
  45. Prévost, Hugo (2021-04-20). "Le gouvernement Legault offrira le vaccin AstraZeneca aux 45 ans et plus dès mercredi" (in French). Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 2021-04-20. Retrieved 2021-04-20.
  46. "Pharmacies on P.E.I. see 'disappointing' drop in AstraZeneca vaccine appointments". CBC News. 2021-04-21. Archived from the original on 2021-04-22. Retrieved 2021-04-22.
  47. Lau, Rebecca (2021-04-21). "N.S. showing hesitancy around AstraZeneca vaccine, health officials say blood clot risk low". Global News. Archived from the original on 2021-04-22. Retrieved 2021-04-22.
  48. "Files d'attente avant l'aube pour le vaccin d'AstraZeneca" (in French). Le Devoir. 2021-04-21. Retrieved 2021-04-21.
  49. Olivier, Annabelle (2021-04-23). "Walk-in clinics in Montreal close after successful AstraZeneca vaccination blitz". Global News. Retrieved 2021-04-24.
  50. "Fin de la campagne de vaccination sans rendez-vous à Montréal" (in French). Radio-Canada. 2021-04-23. Retrieved 2021-04-24.
  51. Lofaro, Joe (2021-04-22). "Quebec opening up vaccine slots to more people with chronic illnesses, disabilities". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-04-29.
  52. 1 2 "Vaccins : Québec ouvre les rendez-vous dès mardi pour les personnes handicapées" (in French). Radio-Canada. 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2021-04-26.
  53. "Campagne de vaccination contre la COVID-19" (in French). Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original on 2021-04-27. Retrieved 2021-04-27.
  54. Crête, Mylène (2021-04-27). "La vaccination en entreprise est ouverte au Québec" (in French). Le Devoir. Retrieved 2021-04-27.
  55. Luft, Amy; Caruso-Moro, Luca (2021-04-27). "Quebec woman dies following AstraZeneca vaccine, public health director confirms". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-04-27.
  56. "Vaccination of pregnant women". COVID-19 vaccination campaign. Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original on 2021-05-08. Retrieved 2021-05-08.
  57. Wilton, Katherine (2021-04-28). "Pregnant Quebecers can register for a COVID-19 vaccination". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  58. 1 2 Shingler, Benjamin; Montpetit, Jonathan (2021-04-29). "Quebec is making COVID-19 vaccines available to the general population. Here's how it will work". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  59. Laframboise, Kalina (2021-05-04). "COVID-19: Quebec unveils drive-thru vaccination site at Montreal airport". Global News. Retrieved 2021-05-06.
  60. "COVID-19: CHSLD residents have now received their second dose". CTV News. 2021-05-10. Retrieved 2021-05-12.
  61. Comité sur l’immunisation du Québec (2021-05-07). "Utilisation du vaccin AstraZeneca contre la COVID-19 dans le contexte du signal de thromboses avec thrombocytopénie suite à la vaccination" (PDF). INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-05-13.
  62. "Quebec halts 1st doses of AstraZeneca vaccine, keeps future supply for 2nd only". CBC News. 2021-05-13. Retrieved 2021-05-13.
  63. Lau, Rachel (2021-05-19). "Circuit Gilles Villeneuve to host bike, drive-thru COVID-19 vaccination clinic". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  64. 1 2 Shingler, Benjamin (2021-05-20). "Quebec makes vaccine available to teens, starting this week and expanding through schools in June". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  65. 1 2 Nerestant, Antoni (2021-05-27). "Quebecers can get 2nd AstraZeneca dose 8 weeks after 1st shot, health minister says". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-29.
  66. "Deuxième dose : la vaccination sans rendez-vous connaît quelques ratés" (in French). Radio-Canada. 2021-05-30. Retrieved 2021-06-03.
  67. 1 2 Maltais, Isabelle (2021-06-03). "Les Québécois pourront devancer leur rendez-vous de 2e dose dès lundi" (in French). Radio-Canada. Retrieved 2021-06-07.
  68. "Québec instaurera un passeport vaccinal début septembre" (in French). Radio-Canada. 2021-07-08. Retrieved 2021-07-10.
  69. Normandin, Pierre-André (2021-07-15). "Les 12 à 17 ans peuvent devancer à quatre semaines leur deuxième dose". La Presse. Retrieved 2021-07-15.
  70. "Quebec to hand out $2M in prizes to boost vaccination rates". CBC News. 2021-07-16. Retrieved 2021-07-18.
  71. "Québec offre une 3e dose pour faciliter les voyages à l'étranger" (in French). Radio Canada. 2021-05-24. Retrieved 2021-07-25.
  72. Olson, Isaac; Cabrera, Holly (2021-08-05). "Facing onset of 4th wave of COVID-19 infections, Quebec to implement vaccine passport system". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  73. Jonas, Sabrina (2021-08-10). "Quebec to implement COVID-19 vaccine passport on Sept. 1 in the face of 'inevitable' 4th wave". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-08-14.
  74. "Les travailleurs de la santé du Québec devront obligatoirement se faire vacciner" (in French). Radio-Canada. 2021-08-17. Retrieved 2021-08-17.
  75. "Mandatory vaccination of health and social services workers against COVID-19". COVID-19 vaccination campaign. Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original on 2021-09-26.
  76. Shingler, Benjamin (2021-09-09). "Tens of thousands of Quebec health-care workers still unvaccinated as mandatory policy nears".
  77. "COVID-19 vaccination passport". Quebec.ca. Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original on 2021-09-17.
  78. Shingler, Benjamin (2021-09-01). "Quebec's vaccine passport goes into effect, limiting much of public life for those unvaccinated". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-09-01.
  79. "The vaccine passport grace period is now over in Quebec". CTV News. 2021-09-15. Retrieved 2021-09-17.
  80. "Vaccination : pas d'exemption religieuse pour le personnel de la santé au Québec" [Vaccination: no religious exemption for healthcare personnel]. Radio-Canada (in French). 2021-10-07. Retrieved 2021-10-08.
  81. Maltais, Isabelle (2021-10-08). "Vaccination en santé : le ministre Dubé suggère la suspension du permis d'exercer". Radio-Canada (in French). Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  82. "Vaccination obligatoire : l'Ordre des pharmaciens du Québec appliquera le décret". Radio-Canada (in French). 2021-10-12. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  83. "Unvaccinated nurses won't be allowed to practise in Quebec, order confirms". CBC News. 2021-10-11. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  84. Nadeau, Jean-François (2021-10-12). "La suspension des travailleurs de la santé contestée devant les tribunaux". Radio-Canada (in French). Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  85. Jonas, Sabrina (2021-10-13). "Quebec delays vaccine mandate for health-care workers by one month, fearing staffing crisis". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  86. Schué, Romain (2021-10-18). "Les travailleurs de la santé non vaccinés ne seront plus payés pour être testés". Radio-Canada (in French). Retrieved 2021-10-19.
  87. "Quebec backs down again on mandatory vaccination in health network". CBC News. 2021-11-03. Retrieved 2021-11-03.
  88. 1 2 Bordeleau, Stéphane (2021-11-09). "COVID-19 : une dose de rappel pour les Québécois de 70 ans et plus" [COVID-19: A third dose for Quebecers aged 70 and up]. Radio-Canada (in French). Retrieved 2021-11-13.
  89. Crête, Mylène (2020-12-30). "Québec garde des doses du vaccin en réserve". Le Devoir (in French). Retrieved 2021-04-21. J’ai demandé au Dr Arruda, avec certaines autres provinces, […] de voir si on pouvait continuer à forcer la main à Pfizer pour libérer ces doses-là.
  90. "Stratégie de vaccination contre la COVID-19 : report de la 2e dose en contexte de pénurie" (PDF). INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement du Québec. 2020-12-18. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-01-04. Retrieved 2021-01-14. [...] la stratégie qui devrait prévenir le plus grand nombre de cas serait d’offrir le plus rapidement possible une 1re dose de vaccin aux personnes figurant dans les six premiers groupes prioritaires.
  91. Messier, François (2021-01-08). "Report de la deuxième dose des vaccins : Ottawa met en doute la stratégie de Québec" (in French). Radio-Canada. Archived from the original on 2021-04-20. Retrieved 2021-04-20.
  92. Kovac, Adam (2021-01-11). "Pfizer could withdraw vaccine supply from Quebec if two-dose schedule not followed: Legault". CTV News. Archived from the original on 2021-01-13. Retrieved 2021-01-11.
  93. "Archived 5: NACI rapid response: Extended dose intervals for COVID-19 vaccines to optimize early vaccine rollout and population protection in Canada [2021-03-03]". The National Advisory Committee on Immunization. Government of Canada. Retrieved 2021-04-17.
  94. "Quatre mois maximum entre deux doses de vaccin, recommande le comité fédéral | Coronavirus". Radio-Canada.ca (in French). Retrieved 2021-04-12.
  95. Duchaine, Hugo. "Des deuxièmes doses déjà reçues en CHSLD". Le Journal de Montréal. Retrieved 2021-04-15.
  96. Riopel, Alexis; Cousineau, Marie-Eve (2021-04-22). "Québec forcé d'interchanger les vaccins en CHSLD" (in French). Le Devoir. Retrieved 2021-05-03.
  97. "Avis intérimaire sur l'utilisation des vaccins à ARN messager contre la COVID-19" (PDF). INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement du Québec. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-05-03. Retrieved 2021-05-03. Lors de l’administration de la 2e dose du vaccin contre la COVID-19, si le même vaccin utilisé lors de la première dose n’est pas disponible sur place ou si le vaccin donné lors de la première dose est inconnu, il faut administrer dans la mesure du possible cette deuxième dose avec un type de vaccin similaire
  98. Fleury, Élisabeth (2021-06-16). "Les vaccinés AstraZeneca invités à choisir Pfizer ou Moderna comme deuxième dose". Le Soleil. Retrieved 2021-07-09.
  99. Banerjee, Sidhartha (2021-07-05). "Quebec reduces interval between COVID-19 vaccine doses to four weeks". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-09-01.
  100. "Le Québec offrira une 3e dose aux personnes immunosupprimées" [Quebec will offer a third dose to immunosuppressed people]. Radio-Canada (in French). 2021-08-30.
  101. Rowe, Daniel J.; Lau, Rachel (2021-09-28). "Quebec announces 3rd COVID-19 vaccine dose for seniors in residences". CTV News.
  102. "Pertinence d'offrir durant l'automne 2021 une dose de rappel d'un vaccin contre la COVID-19 aux personnes qui résident en CHSLD ou RPA" (PDF). INSPQ (in French). Gouvernement du Québec.
  103. "Avis préliminaire sur les groupes prioritaires pour la vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Québec". INSPQ. 7 December 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2021.
  104. 1 2 "Avis préliminaire sur les groupes prioritaires pour la vaccination contre la COVID-19 au Québec : AVIS DU COMITÉ SUR L'IMMUNISATION DU QUÉBEC" (PDF). INSPQ. November 2020. Retrieved 23 March 2021.
  105. Forani, Jonathan; Aiello, Rachel (2020-12-14). "'V-Day': First COVID-19 vaccines administered in Canada". CTV News. Archived from the original on 2021-01-05. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  106. Montpetit, Jonathan; Shingler, Benjamin (2020-12-14). "As first Quebecers get vaccinated against COVID-19, leaders see light at end of long, dark tunnel". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-15.
  107. Bell, Susan (2021-01-06). "Region-wide COVID-19 vaccination campaign set to begin in Quebec Cree communities". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-10.
  108. Pashagumskum, Jamie (2021-01-06). "Cree Nation in Quebec vaccinates first elders and is ready to rollout more". APTN News. Archived from the original on 2021-05-10. Retrieved 2021-05-10.
  109. 1 2 "People in Montreal age 70 and over can now make appointments for COVID-19 vaccines". CTV News. 2021-02-28. Retrieved 2021-05-15.
  110. Olivier, Annabelle (2021-03-22). "Quebec extends vaccine eligibility to Montreal residents over 60, as pharmacies join inoculation effort". Global News. Retrieved 2021-05-15.
  111. 1 2 Kovac, Adam (2021-04-13). "More Quebec essential workers, people with high-risk health conditions can book vaccines as of Wednesday". CTV News. Retrieved 2021-05-11.
  112. Beaupré, Éric (2021-04-13). "La vaccination élargie à l'ensemble du Québec pour deux groupes prioritaires dès le 14 avril" (in French). Vingt55. Archived from the original on 2021-05-10. Retrieved 2021-05-10.
  113. Steuter-Martin, Marilla (2021-05-22). "Quebec widens priority vaccination to more chronic conditions, people with disabilities". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-11.
  114. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Shingler, Benjamin; Montpetit, Jonathan (2021-04-29). "Quebec is making COVID-19 vaccines available to the general population. Here's how it will work". CBC News. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  115. POLIQUIN, V; CASTILLO, E; BOUCOIRAN, I; WATSON, H; YUDIN, M; MONEY, D; VAN SCHALKWYK, J; ELWOOD, C. "SOGC Statement on COVID-19 Vaccination in Pregnancy" (PDF). The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2021-04-23. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  116. Paré, Isabelle (2021-04-21). "Le vaccin contre la COVID-19, un casse-tête pour les femmes?" (in French). Le Devoir. Archived from the original on 2021-04-22. Retrieved 2021-04-22. Des médecins gynécologues inquiets appellent quant à eux à plutôt vacciner en urgence les femmes enceintes, compte tenu des complications graves observées récemment ailleurs au Canada. Samedi, dans certains hôpitaux de Toronto, plus de la moitié des malades admis aux soins intensifs étaient des femmes enceintes.
  117. Wilton, Katherine (2021-04-28). "Pregnant Quebecers can register for a COVID-19 vaccination". Montreal Gazette. Retrieved 2021-05-02.
  118. Krugel, Lauren (24 December 2020). "Les détenus devraient recevoir le vaccin rapidement, selon des experts". Le Devoir. Retrieved 2021-04-09.