Caddo River

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Caddo River
Norman, AR 002.jpg
Caddo River at Norman
USA Arkansas location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location of the mouth of the Caddo River in Arkansas
Location
CountryUnited States
StateArkansas
Physical characteristics
SourceCaddo Mountains
 - locationOuachita Mountains
 - coordinates 34°27′9″N93°55′22″W / 34.45250°N 93.92278°W / 34.45250; -93.92278 [1]
 - elevation1,400 ft (430 m) [2]
Mouth Ouachita River
 - location
near Arkadelphia, Arkansas
 - coordinates
34°10′48″N93°2′36″W / 34.18000°N 93.04333°W / 34.18000; -93.04333 Coordinates: 34°10′48″N93°2′36″W / 34.18000°N 93.04333°W / 34.18000; -93.04333 [1]
 - elevation
144 ft (44 m) [2]
Length82 mi (132 km) [2]
Discharge 
 - location USGS gage 07359610, near Caddo Gap, AR [3]
 - average267 cu ft/s (7.6 m3/s) [3]
 - minimum16 cu ft/s (0.45 m3/s)
 - maximum28,600 cu ft/s (810 m3/s)

The Caddo River is a tributary of the Ouachita River in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The river is about 82 miles (132 km) long. [2]

Ouachita River river in the United States of America

The Ouachita River is a 605-mile-long (974 km) river that runs south and east through the U.S. states of Arkansas and Louisiana, joining the Tensas River to form the Black River near Jonesville, Louisiana. It is the 25th-longest river in the United States.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

Course

The Caddo River flows out of the Ouachita Mountains through Montgomery, Pike, and Clark counties in Arkansas before flowing into DeGray Lake and then to its terminus at the Ouachita River north of Arkadelphia, Arkansas.

Ouachita Mountains

The Ouachita Mountains, simply referred to as the Ouachitas, are a mountain range in western Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma. They are formed by a thick succession of highly deformed Paleozoic strata constituting the Ouachita Fold and Thrust Belt, one of the important orogenic belts of North America. The Ouachitas continue in the subsurface to the southeast where they make a poorly understood connection with the Appalachians and to the southwest where they join with the Marathon area of West Texas. Together with the Ozark Plateaus, the Ouachitas form the U.S. Interior Highlands. The highest natural point is Mount Magazine at 2,753 feet.

Montgomery County, Arkansas County in the United States

Montgomery County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,487. The county seat is Mount Ida. Montgomery County is Arkansas's 45th county, formed on December 9, 1842, and named after Richard Montgomery, an American Revolutionary War general.

Pike County, Arkansas County in the United States

Pike County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,291. The county seat is Murfreesboro. Pike County is Arkansas's 25th county, formed on November 1, 1833, and named for Lieutenant Zebulon Pike, the explorer who discovered Pikes Peak. It is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

The upper Caddo is known as a good family canoeing river and is a popular destination for fishing. Smallmouth and spotted bass are found in quantity, as are longear and green sunfish. The lower course of the Caddo, below Degray Dam, is also a popular fishing and canoeing river, although the length of river remaining is only a few miles at that point.

Canoeing paddle sport in which you kneel or sit facing forward in an open or closed-decked canoe, and propel yourself with a single-bladed paddle, under your own power

Canoeing is an activity which involves paddling a canoe with a single-bladed paddle. Common meanings of the term are limited to when the canoeing is the central purpose of the activity. Broader meanings include when it is combined with other activities such as canoe camping, or where canoeing is merely a transportation method used to accomplish other activities. Most present-day canoeing is done as or as a part of a sport or recreational activity. In some parts of Europe canoeing refers to both canoeing and kayaking, with a canoe being called an Open canoe.

Fishing Activity of trying to catch fish

Fishing is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. “Fishing” may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not normally applied to catching farmed fish, or to aquatic mammals, such as whales where the term whaling is more appropriate. In addition to being caught to be eaten, fish are caught as recreational pastimes. Fishing tournaments are held, and caught fish are sometimes kept as preserved or living trophies. When bioblitzes occur, fish are typically caught, identified, and then released.

Bass is a name shared by many species of fish. The term encompasses both freshwater and marine species, all belonging to the large order Perciformes, or perch-like fishes. The word bass comes from Middle English bars, meaning "perch".

Communities through which the Caddo River passes are:

Black Springs, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Black Springs is a town in Montgomery County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 114 at the 2000 census.

Norman, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Norman is a town in Montgomery County, Arkansas, United States. It was known as Womble until 1925. The population was 378 at the 2010 census.

Caddo Gap is an unincorporated community in Montgomery County, Arkansas, United States. It lies between Glenwood and Norman, on the Caddo River. It is best known as the area in which explorer Hernando de Soto and his forces clashed with the Tula tribe, a band loosely affiliated with the Caddo Confederacy. The expedition described the Tula Indians as the fiercest they had faced during their inward journey into North America.

Flood of 2010

On the night of June, 2010, a flash flood along the Caddo and Little Missouri Rivers killed twenty people. [4]

2010 Arkansas floods

The June 2010 Arkansas floods were flash floods that killed at least 20 people near Langley, Arkansas, United States, in the early morning of June 11, 2010. Heavy, localized rainfall from six to eight inches (150–200 mm) flooded the Little Missouri and Caddo rivers, sweeping through campsites in the Ouachita National Forest.

Little Missouri River (Arkansas) river in the United States of America

The Little Missouri River, or Little Mo, is a 147-mile-long (237 km) waterway that runs from the Ouachita Mountains of southwest Arkansas into the rolling hills area in the surrounding countryside.

Etymology

The Caddo River is named for the Caddo Indian tribes that, at one time, lived along its banks.

See also

Related Research Articles

Clark County, Arkansas County in the United States

Clark County is a county located in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 22,995. The county seat is Arkadelphia. The Arkadelphia, AR Micropolitan Statistical Area includes all of Clark County.

Arkadelphia, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Arkadelphia is a city in Clark County, Arkansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,714. The city is the county seat of Clark County. It is situated at the foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. Two universities, Henderson State University and Ouachita Baptist University, are located there. Arkadelphia was incorporated in 1857.

Caddo Valley, Arkansas Town in Arkansas, United States

Caddo Valley is a town in Clark County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 635 at the 2010 census.

Glenwood, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Glenwood is a city in Pike and Montgomery counties in Arkansas. The community is located along the Caddo River in the Ouachita Mountains. Glenwood was formed as a boomtown following the development of the Gurdon and Fort Smith Railroad and timber interests in the area. After the establishment of a lumber mill, the community received a post office and incorporated in April 1909. Although the community saw its major employer leave during the Great Depression, the city has again seen rapid growth in recent decades. The city also sees significant tourism related to its scenic position in the Ouachitas and among several recreational lakes.

Arkansas River major tributary of the Mississippi River, United States

The Arkansas River is a major tributary of the Mississippi River. It generally flows to the east and southeast as it traverses the U.S. states of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. The river's source basin lies in the western United States in Colorado, specifically the Arkansas River Valley, where the headwaters derive from the snowpack in the Sawatch and Mosquito mountain ranges. It then flows east into the Midwest via Kansas, and finally into the South through Oklahoma and Arkansas.

Ouachita National Forest

The Ouachita National Forest is a National Forest that lies in the western portion of Arkansas and portions of eastern Oklahoma.

White River (Arkansas–Missouri) river in Arkansas and Missouri, United States

The White River is a 722-mile (1,162 km) long river that flows through the U.S. states of Arkansas and Missouri. Originating in the Boston Mountains of northwest Arkansas, it flows northwards into southern Missouri, and then turns back into Arkansas, flowing southeast to its mouth at the Mississippi River.

The Spring River is a 57-mile (92 km) long river which flows through the U.S. states of Missouri and Arkansas. It consists of two branches, the South Fork of the Spring River and the Spring River proper. The South Fork of the Spring River starts in Howell County, Missouri and flows south through Fulton and Sharp counties in Arkansas. The South Fork of the Spring River joins the Spring River proper near the town of Hardy, Arkansas. The South Fork is a quiet stream with gravelly bars that are ideal for camping.

St. Francis River river in the United States of America

The St. Francis River is a tributary of the Mississippi River, about 426 miles (686 km) long, in southeastern Missouri and northeastern Arkansas in the United States. The river drains a mostly rural area and forms part of the Missouri-Arkansas state line along the western side of the Missouri Bootheel.

Chena River river in Alaska

The Chena River is a 100-mile (160 km) tributary of the Tanana River in the Interior region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It flows generally west from the White Mountains to the Tanana River near the city of Fairbanks, which is built on both sides of the river. The Tanana empties into the 2,300-mile (3,700 km) long Yukon River.

Mountain Fork river in the United States of America

Mountain Fork, also known as the Mountain Fork of the Little River, is a 98-mile-long (158 km) tributary of the Little River in western Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma in the United States. Via the Little and Red rivers, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River.

Lake Ouachita lake in United States of America

Lake Ouachita is a reservoir created by the damming of the Ouachita River by Blakely Mountain Dam.

DeGray Lake

DeGray Lake is a reservoir on the Caddo River in Arkansas, 8 miles (13 km) from Arkadelphia. Arkansas Scenic Byway 7 is located on the eastern shore of the lake, and provides views of the lake, and also places to stay. DeGray Lake Resort State Park was opened in 1974 to encourage tourism and recreation on DeGray Lake.

Little River (Red River tributary) river in Oklahoma and Arkansas, United States of America

The Little River is a tributary of the Red River, with a total length of 217 miles (349 km), 130 miles (210 km) in southeastern Oklahoma and 87 miles (140 km) in southwestern Arkansas. in southeastern Oklahoma and southwestern Arkansas in the United States. Via the Red, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Six large reservoirs impound the Little River and its tributaries. The drainage basin of the river totals 4,204 square miles (10,890 km2), 2,204 square miles (5,710 km2) in Oklahoma and 2,036 square miles (5,270 km2) in Arkansas. The Little River and its upper tributaries are popular for recreational canoeing and kayaking.

Geography of Arkansas

The geography of Arkansas varies widely. The state is covered by mountains, river valleys, forests, lakes, and bayous in addition to the cities of Arkansas. Hot Springs National Park features bubbling springs of hot water, formerly sought across the country for their healing properties. Crowley's Ridge is a geological anomaly rising above the surrounding lowlands of the Mississippi embayment.

References

  1. 1 2 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Caddo River
  2. 1 2 3 4 Calculated in Google Maps and Google Earth
  3. 1 2 "Water resources data for the United States, Water Year 2009; gage 07359610, Caddo River near Caddo Gap, AR" (PDF). USGS . Retrieved 4 August 2010.
  4. Holmes, Robert; Wagner, Daniel (2011). "Flood of June 11, 2010 in the Upper Little Missouri River Watershed, Arkansas". U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2011-5194: 31.