Caesar Belser

Last updated
Caesar Belser
No. 24, 50
Position: Linebacker, safety
Personal information
Born:(1944-09-13)September 13, 1944
Montgomery, Alabama
Died:March 5, 2016(2016-03-05) (aged 71)
Hurst, Texas
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:205 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school: Montgomery (AL) Carver
College: Arkansas AM&N
NFL Draft: 1966  / Round: 10 / Pick: 145
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:60
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Caesar Edward Belser (September 13, 1944 – March 5, 2016) was an American football linebacker and safety who played in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL).

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He played college football at the Arkansas AM&N, and professionally in the AFL and the NFL for the Kansas City Chiefs and later the San Francisco 49ers.

Belser died on the weekend of March 5, 2016, according to his family. He was 71. He was battling lung cancer, as well as neurological damage from playing football. Per his family's wishes, his brain will be donated to scientific research. Belser was survived by his son Jason and daughter Cecilia. [1]

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