California State Route 123

Last updated
California 123.svg
State Route 123
San Pablo Avenue
California State Route 123 Map.svg
Map of California's San Francisco Bay Area with SR 123 highlighted in red
Route information
Defined by Streets and Highways Code § 423
Maintained by Caltrans
Length7.375 mi [1]  (11.869 km)
Major junctions
South endI-580 (1961).svg I-580 in Oakland
 California 13.svg SR 13 in Berkeley
North endI-80 (1961).svg I-80 in Richmond
Location
Counties Alameda, Contra Costa
Highway system
California 121.svg SR 121 California 124.svg SR 124

State Route 123 (SR 123) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California in the San Francisco Bay Area. Named San Pablo Avenue for virtually its entire length, SR 123 is a major northsouth state highway along the flats of the urban East Bay. Route 123 runs about 7.39 miles (11.9 km) between Interstate 580 in Oakland in the south and Interstate 80 in Richmond in the north. San Pablo Avenue itself, a portion of Historic US 40, continues well past these termini, south to Downtown Oakland and north to Crockett, but without the Route 123 designation.

Contents

Route description

Route 123 is a four-lane boulevard with a median strip for its entire length. Its southern terminus is at the underpass of Interstate 580 in Oakland. Going north, it passes through the cities of Emeryville, Berkeley, Albany, and El Cerrito. It briefly turns on Cutting Boulevard before entering Richmond at its northern terminus under Interstate 80.

San Pablo Avenue is sometimes used as an alternate route to the Eastshore Freeway (Interstate 80) when that freeway becomes very congested. Major intersections along this route include 40th Street, Ashby Avenue (State Route 13), University Avenue (which leads to UC Berkeley), Gilman Street, Marin Avenue, Central Avenue and Cutting Boulevard.

Continuing on San Pablo Avenue past Route 123's southern terminus eventually leads to downtown Oakland and Oakland City Hall where San Pablo Avenue ends. Continuing on San Pablo Avenue before Route 123's northern terminus leads to the cities of San Pablo, Pinole, Hercules, Rodeo, and Crockett. In Hercules, San Pablo Avenue meets the terminus of State Route 4 near Interstate 80, and, after a discontinuity bridged by Parker Avenue in Rodeo, the road approaches the Carquinez Bridge and arrives in Crockett as Pomona Street.

An AC Transit Rapid Bus (72R-San Pablo Rapid) runs along San Pablo Ave. from Downtown Oakland to Contra Costa College in San Pablo. The express bus line was put in place after a Metropolitan Transportation Commission study determined that it would be more cost-effective than a previous proposal to install light rail along the route. The BART system runs its Richmond leg parallel to the route up to the El Cerrito Del Norte station.

Route shield signs at the intersection of San Pablo Avenue (SR 123) and Ashby Avenue (State Route 13) in Berkeley. CA123-CA13.jpg
Route shield signs at the intersection of San Pablo Avenue (SR 123) and Ashby Avenue (State Route 13) in Berkeley.

The Alvarado Adobe is located by the San Pablo City Hall on the corner of San Pablo Avenue and Church Lane.

SR 123 is part of the National Highway System, [2] a network of highways that are considered essential to the country's economy, defense, and mobility by the Federal Highway Administration. [3]

History

San Pablo Avenue is one of the oldest existing roads in the East Bay. It originated in the Spanish colonial era as the Camino de la Contra Costa ("road of the opposite shore", i.e. opposite from the Presidio of San Francisco and the settlement around the Mission in San Francisco) and was legally a "camino real" [4] ("royal road", i.e., property of the Spanish crown) until Mexico won its independence in 1821. It ran from the Encinal ("Oakland") landings of the Rancho San Antonio northward (actually northwestward) along the bayshore, then eastward just inland of the Carquinez Strait. It was the principal thoroughfare for the scattered ranches throughout this part of the East Bay.

The name persisted into the American era when it was still called the "Contra Costa Road". On July 15, 1852, the Court of Sessions of Contra Costa County ordered the construction of a more direct and somewhat improved road along the same general route between the Rancho San Pablo and Oakland, [5] which consequently became known as "The San Pablo Road". This segment subsequently became today's "San Pablo Avenue".

In 1927, this road was designated as part of the Lincoln Highway, the nation's first transcontinental road upon the opening of the new highway bridge across the Carquinez Strait.

Prior to the construction of the Eastshore Highway, San Pablo Avenue was the main northsouth route through the northern East Bay, carrying the designation U.S. Route 40 north of University Avenue in Berkeley (US 40 proceeded down to the foot of university and the end of the Berkeley Pier where an auto ferry transported motorists to the Hyde Street Pier in San Francisco). U.S. 40 was moved to the new highway after it was built (1930s), and about 25 years later took its current designation of Interstate 80. San Pablo Avenue was Business U.S. 40 until 1964.

During 2005–06, San Pablo Avenue was repaved and otherwise rehabilitated by Caltrans. Portions of San Pablo Avenue, particularly in Berkeley, Albany, and El Cerrito, are slowly transforming, with a mix of trendy[ peacock term ] shops, restaurants and condominium developments.

In the early part of the 20th century, a streetcar line ran on San Pablo between Richmond and Oakland. Part of the Oakland segment of these tracks up to Grayson Street in Berkeley were used during World War II for the Shipyard Railway of the Key System which transported workers from the Key System's hub in Emeryville to the Kaiser Shipyards in Richmond.

Major intersections

Except where prefixed with a letter, postmiles were measured on the road as it was in 1964, based on the alignment that existed at the time, and do not necessarily reflect current mileage. R reflects a realignment in the route since then, M indicates a second realignment, L refers an overlap due to a correction or change, and T indicates postmiles classified as temporary (for a full list of prefixes, see California postmile § Official postmile definitions ). [1] Segments that remain unconstructed or have been relinquished to local control may be omitted. The numbers reset at county lines; the start and end postmiles in each county are given in the county column.

CountyLocationPostmile
[1] [6] [7]
DestinationsNotes
Alameda
ALA 0.00-5.18
Oakland 0.00San Pablo AvenueContinuation beyond I-580
0.00I-580 (1961).svgTo plate green.svg
California 24.svg
I-580 east (MacArthur Freeway) to SR 24  Hayward, Stockton, Walnut Creek
Interchange; south end of SR 123
Berkeley 1.91California 13.svgTo plate blue.svg
I-80 (1961).svg
SR 13 (Ashby Avenue) to I-80  Walnut Creek, San Francisco
3.15University AvenueServes UC Berkeley
Contra Costa
CC 0.00-2.20
El Cerrito 0.29Central Avenue
2.10San Pablo Avenue, Cutting BoulevardSan Pablo Avenue was former US 40 east
Richmond 2.20I-80 (1961).svg I-80 east (Eastshore Freeway) Sacramento Interchange; north end of SR 123
2.20Cutting Boulevard Point Richmond Continuation beyond I-80
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also

Related Research Articles

Contra Costa County, California County in California, United States

Contra Costa County is located in the state of California in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 1,165,927. The county seat is Martinez. It occupies the northern portion of the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area, and is primarily suburban. The county's name refers to its position on the other side of the bay from San Francisco. Contra Costa County is included in the San Francisco–Oakland–Berkeley, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Crockett, California Census-designated place in California, United States

Crockett is a census-designated place (CDP) in Contra Costa County, in the East Bay sub-region of the San Francisco Bay Area, California. The population was 3,094 at the 2010 census. It is located 28 miles northeast of San Francisco. Other nearby communities include Port Costa, Martinez, Vallejo, Benicia, Rodeo, Hercules, Pinole and Richmond.

San Pablo, California City in California, United States

San Pablo is a city in Contra Costa County, California, United States. The city of Richmond surrounds nearly the whole city. The population was 29,139 at the 2010 census. The current Mayor is Elizabeth Pabon-Alvarado. Currently, the City Council consists of Arturo Cruz, Rita Xavier, Abel Pineda and Patricia Ponce. Xavier is the Vice Mayor, and Cruz, Pineda, and Ponce are Council Members. Dorothy Gantt is the city Clerk. Viviana Toledo is the city Treasurer.

Interstate 880 (I-880) is a north–south auxiliary Interstate Highway in the San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California. It runs from I-280 and State Route 17 (SR 17) in San Jose to I-80 and I-580 in Oakland, running parallel to the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay. For most of its route, I-880 is officially known as the Nimitz Freeway, after World War II fleet admiral Chester Nimitz, who retired to the Bay Area. The northernmost five miles is also commonly referred to as the Cypress Freeway, after the former alignment of the freeway, and its subsequent replacement.

Interstate 580 (I-580) is an approximately 82-mile-long (132 km) east–west auxiliary Interstate Highway in Northern California. The heavily traveled spur route of I-80 runs from US 101 in San Rafael in the San Francisco Bay Area to I-5 near Tracy in the Central Valley. I-580 forms a concurrency with I-80 between Albany and Oakland, the latter of which is the location of the MacArthur Maze interchange immediately east of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge. I-580 provides a connection from the Bay Area to the southern San Joaquin Valley and Southern California via I-5, as I-5 bypasses the Bay Area to the east.

Interstate 680 (I-680) is a north–south auxiliary Interstate Highway in Northern California. It curves around the eastern cities of the San Francisco Bay Area from San Jose to Interstate 80 at Fairfield, bypassing cities along the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay such as Oakland and Richmond while serving others more inland such as Pleasanton and Concord.

Carquinez Strait Tidal strait in Northern California

The Carquinez Strait is a narrow tidal strait in Northern California. It is part of the tidal estuary of the Sacramento and the San Joaquin rivers as they drain into the San Francisco Bay. The strait is eight miles (13 km) long and connects Suisun Bay, which receives the waters of the combined rivers, with San Pablo Bay, a northern extension of the San Francisco Bay.

California State Route 13 State highway in Alameda County, California, United States

State Route 13 is a state highway in the U.S. state of California. It runs entirely in Alameda County, connecting Interstate 580 in Oakland to Interstate 80/Interstate 580 in Berkeley.

California State Route 24 Highway in California

State Route 24 is a heavily traveled east–west state highway in the U.S. state of California that serves the eastern side of the San Francisco Bay Area. A freeway throughout its entire length, it runs from the Interstate 580/Interstate 980 interchange in Oakland, and through the Caldecott Tunnel under the Berkeley Hills, to the Interstate 680 junction in Walnut Creek. It lies in Alameda County, where it is highly urban, and Contra Costa County, where it passes through wooded hillsides and suburbs. SR 24 is a major connection between the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge/MacArthur Maze complex and the inland cities of the East Bay.

East Bay Eastern region of the San Francisco Bay Area, California, US

The East Bay is the eastern region of the San Francisco Bay Area and includes cities along the eastern shores of the San Francisco Bay and San Pablo Bay. The region has grown to include inland communities in Alameda and Contra Costa counties. With a population of roughly 2.5 million in 2010, it is the most populous subregion in the Bay Area.

MacArthur Maze

The MacArthur Maze is a large freeway interchange near the east end of the San Francisco–Oakland Bay Bridge in Oakland, California. It splits Bay Bridge traffic into three freeways—the Eastshore (I-80/I-580), MacArthur (I-580) and Nimitz (I-880).

California State Route 17 State highway in Santa Cruz and Santa Clara counties in California, United States

State Route 17 (SR 17) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California that runs from State Route 1 in Santa Cruz to I-280 and I-880 in San Jose. SR 17, a freeway and expressway, carries substantial commuter and vacation traffic through the Santa Cruz Mountains at Patchen Pass between Santa Cruz and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area Overview of transportation in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, United States

People in the San Francisco Bay Area rely on a complex multimodal transportation infrastructure consisting of roads, bridges, highways, rail, tunnels, airports, seaports, and bike and pedestrian paths. The development, maintenance, and operation of these different modes of transportation are overseen by various agencies, including the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the Association of Bay Area Governments, San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, and the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. These and other organizations collectively manage several interstate highways and state routes, two subway networks, two commuter rail agencies, eight trans-bay bridges, transbay ferry service, local bus service, three international airports, and an extensive network of roads, tunnels, and bike paths.

West Berkeley, Berkeley, California

West Berkeley is generally the area of Berkeley, California, that lies west of San Pablo Avenue, abutting San Francisco Bay. It includes the area that was once the unincorporated town of Ocean View, as well as the filled-in areas along the shoreline west of I-80, mainly including the Berkeley Marina. It lies at an elevation of 23 feet.

Interstate 80 (I-80) is a transcontinental Interstate Highway in the United States, stretching from San Francisco, California, to Teaneck, New Jersey. The segment of I-80 in California runs east from San Francisco across the Bay Bridge to Oakland, where it turns north and crosses the Carquinez Bridge before turning back northeast through the Sacramento Valley. I-80 then traverses the Sierra Nevada, cresting at Donner Summit, before crossing into the state of Nevada within the Truckee River Canyon. The speed limit is at most 65 miles per hour (105 km/h) along the entire route instead of the state's maximum of 70 mph (110 km/h) and most of the route is in either urban areas or mountainous terrain. I-80 has portions designated as the Eastshore Freeway and Alan S. Hart Freeway.

Richmond Heights, Richmond, California Place in Richmond, California, United States of America

Richmond Heights, formerly East Richmond and also known as Mira Vista, is a district of eastern Richmond, California in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Cutting Boulevard

Cutting Boulevard is a major east–west arterial trunk road in the city of Richmond, California.

Point Isabel is a small promontory on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay in the Richmond Annex neighborhood of Richmond, USA. It can be reached at the west terminus of Central Ave. from Richmond / El Cerrito.

Carquinez Strait Regional Shoreline

Carquinez Strait Regional Shoreline is a regional park, part of the East Bay Regional Park District system, located in northwestern Contra Costa County, California.

East Shore and Suburban Railway

The Eastshore and Suburban Railway (E&SR) was a formerly independent unit of the historic San Francisco Bay Area Key System which ran streetcar trains in Richmond, California, San Pablo, and El Cerrito. There were several lines with terminals at Point Richmond, North Richmond, the county line with Alameda County, what is now San Pablo, and Grand Canyon/East Richmond/Alvarado Park. Service to Oakland required a transfer to Oakland Traction Company trains at the County Line station and service to San Francisco required an additional transfer in Oakland. The systems were later consolidated into the Key System. Service began to be replaced by buses beginning on August 1, 1932, with the conversion of the East Richmond/23rd Street line to buses. Lines were converted to buses one at a time with the last remaining line being in September 1933. Fares were originally 5 cents and were raised to 7 cents over time at the time of the last runs.

References

  1. 1 2 3 California Department of Transportation. "State Truck Route List". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation. Archived from the original (XLS file) on June 30, 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  2. Federal Highway Administration (March 25, 2015). National Highway System: San Francisco–Oakland, CA (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved September 30, 2017.
  3. Natzke, Stefan; Neathery, Mike & Adderly, Kevin (June 20, 2012). "What is the National Highway System?". National Highway System. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved July 1, 2012.
  4. Diseño del Rancho de San Pablo, Bancroft Library Collection, c. 1830
  5. https://books.google.com/books?id=3hIVAAAAYAAJ&printsec=titlepage#PPA205,M1 History of Contra Costa County, J. P. Munro-Fraser, published by W.A. Slocum, 1882
  6. California Department of Transportation (July 2007). "Log of Bridges on State Highways". Sacramento: California Department of Transportation.
  7. California Department of Transportation, All Traffic Volumes on CSHS, 2005 and 2006

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