Callaqui

Last updated
Callaqui
Volcan Callaqui y Laguna El Barco.jpg
El Barco Lake in the foreground, Callaqui in the background left
Highest point
Elevation 3,164 m (10,381 ft)
Coordinates 37°55′0″S71°27′0″W / 37.91667°S 71.45000°W / -37.91667; -71.45000 Coordinates: 37°55′0″S71°27′0″W / 37.91667°S 71.45000°W / -37.91667; -71.45000
Geography
Location Chile
Parent range Andes
Geology
Mountain type Fissure stratovolcano
Last eruption October 1980

Callaqui is a stratovolcano located in the Bío Bío Region of Chile. It is a large ice-capped, basaltic andesite volcano which is elongated in the northeast-southwest direction, due to its construction along an 11 km (7 mi) long fissure. Numerous cinder cones and lava flows have erupted from vents along this linear fissure. Most of the activity at Callaqui has been fumarolic. Minor eruptions were reported 1751, 1864, and 1937, and the latest eruption was a small phreatic eruption in 1980.

Together with Hekla in Iceland Callaqui is one of the few volcanoes with have a morphology between a crater row and stratovolcano (built from mixed lava and tephra eruptions). [1]

The volcano is the centerpiece of Ralco National Reserve.

See also

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References

  1. Moreno Roa, Hugo; Lahsen Azar, Alfredo (1986), "Ejemplos del Volcanismo Fisural en los Andes del Sur (38°L.S.)", Revista de la Asociación Geológica Argentina , 42 (1–2): 1–8