Cameroon national football team

Last updated
Cameroon
Cameroon lions logo.svg
Nickname(s) Les Lions Indomptables
(The Indomitable Lions)
Association Fédération Camerounaise de Football
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Sub-confederation UNIFFAC
(Central Africa)
Head coach Toni Conceição
Captain Jean-Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting
Most caps Rigobert Song (137)
Top scorer Samuel Eto'o (56) [1]
Home stadium Stade Ahmadou Ahidjo
FIFA code CMR
Kit left arm cmr19h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body cmr19h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm cmr19h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm cmr19a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body cmr19a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm cmr19a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 53 Steady2.svg(11 June 2020) [2]
Highest11 (November 2006 – January 2007, November – December 2009)
Lowest79 (February – March 2013)
Elo ranking
Current 63 Decrease2.svg 4 (2 April 2020) [3]
Highest12 (June 2003)
Lowest76 (April 1995)
First international
Flag of Congo Free State.svg  Belgian Congo 3–2 French CameroonFlag of France.svg
(Belgian Congo; September 1956)
Biggest win
Flag of Cameroon (1961-1975).svg  Cameroon 9–0 Chad  Flag of Chad.svg
(Kinshasa, Congo Kinshasa; 7 April 1965)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 6–1 Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg
(Oslo, Norway; 31 October 1990)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 6–1 Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg
(Palo Alto, California, USA; 28 June 1994)
Flag of Costa Rica.svg  Costa Rica 5–0 Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg
(San José, Costa Rica; 9 March 1997)
World Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1982 )
Best resultQuarter-finals, 1990
Africa Cup of Nations
Appearances19 (first in 1970 )
Best resultChampions, 1984, 1988, 2000, 2002, 2017
African Nations Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2016 )
Best resultQuarter-finals, 2016
Confederations Cup
Appearances3 (first in 2001)
Best resultSecond place, 2003

The Cameroon national football team, (French: Équipe nationale du camerounaise de football) represents Cameroon in men's international football and It is controlled by the Fédération Camerounaise de Football. The team has qualified seven times for the FIFA World Cup, more than any other African team (in 1982, 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2010 and 2014). However, the team has only made it once out of the group stage. They were the first African team to reach the quarter-final of the FIFA World Cup in 1990, losing to England in extra time. They have also won five Africa Cup of Nations and Olympic gold in 2000. The team represents Cameroon both in FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Contents

History

First games

Cameroon played its first match against Belgian Congo in 1956, losing 3–2. They first qualified for the Africa Cup of Nations in 1970, but were knocked out in the first round. Two years later, as host nation, the Indomitable Lions finished third after being knocked out by their neighbours and future champions Congo in the 1972 Africa Cup of Nations. They would not qualify for the competition for another ten years.

FIFA 1982 World Cup – the first time

Cameroon qualified for its first FIFA World Cup in 1982. With the increase of 16 to 24 teams Cameroon qualified along with Algeria to represent Africa in Spain. Cameroon was drawn into Group 1 with eventual winners Italy, Poland, and Peru. In their first game, Cameroon faced Peru and drew 0–0. They then had a second goalless draw with Poland before a surprise 1–1 draw with Italy. Despite being unbeaten they failed to qualify for the second round.

African Nations, 1984

Two years later, Cameroon qualified for the 1984 Africa Cup of Nations, held in Ivory Coast. They finished second in their first-round group before beating Algeria on penalties in the semi-final. In the final, Cameroon beat Nigeria 3–1 with goals from René N'Djeya, Théophile Abega and Ernest Ebongué to become champions of Africa for the first time.

FIFA 1990 World Cup – Quarter Finals

Cameroon defeated Argentina in the first game of the 1990 World Cup Argentina v cameroon 1990.jpg
Cameroon defeated Argentina in the first game of the 1990 World Cup

Cameroon qualified for the 1990 World Cup by surpassing Nigeria and beating Tunisia in the final round playoff. In the final tournament, Cameroon were drawn into Group B with Argentina, Romania and the Soviet Union. Cameroon defeated defending champions Argentina in the opening game 1–0 with a goal scored by François Omam-Biyik. Cameroon later defeated Romania 2–1 and lost to the Soviet Union 0–4, becoming the first side to top a World Cup Finals group with a negative goal difference. In the second round, Cameroon defeated Colombia 2–1 with the 38-year-old Roger Milla scoring two goals in the extra time.

In the quarter-finals, Cameroon faced England. After 25 minutes, England's David Platt scored for England, while in the second-half, Cameroon came back with a 61st-minute penalty from Emmanuel Kundé and took the lead with Eugène Ekéké on 65 minutes. England, however, equalized in the 83rd minute with a penalty from Gary Lineker, while Lineker again found the net via a 105th-minute penalty to make the eventual scoreline 3–2 for England. The team was coached by Russian manager and former player Valeri Nepomniachi.

1994 World Cup

The 1994 World Cup in the United States saw the adjustment of representation for three African teams qualify. Cameroon qualified with Nigeria and Morocco. In the final tournament, Cameroon were drawn into Group B with Sweden, Brazil and Russia. After a 2–2 draw against Sweden, Cameroon were determined to make an impact. However, a 3–0 loss to Brazil and a heavy 6–1 loss to Russia knocked them out. In their last game against Russia, the then 42-year-old Roger Milla became the oldest player to play and score in a World Cup finals match. The team was coached by French-born Henri Michel.

1998 World Cup

The 1998 World Cup in France saw the increase of 24 to 32 teams. Cameroon qualified alongside four other African countries. After qualifying as expected, Cameroon were drawn into Group B with Italy, Chile and Austria. Despite drawing with Chile and Austria, a 3–0 defeat to Italy saw Cameroon finish bottom of the group, and they were eliminated as a result. It was an unfortunate elimination, since Cameroon had led Austria 1–0 until the 90th minute, and had two goals dubiously ruled out in a 1–1 draw with Chile. Cameroon had three players sent off in the course of the tournament, more than any other team, despite only playing three games out of a possible seven. They also had the highest card count per game of any team, collecting an average of four bookings in each match they played. [4] It was also during this tournament that a certain Samuel Eto'o was exposed to Cameroonians. He was the youngest player of the tournament alongside Michael Owen of England. The team was coached by French-born Claude Le Roy.

2002 FIFA World Cup

Cameroon qualified for the 2002 World Cup in Korea-Japan, clinching first place in their group which included Angola, Zambia and Togo. Cameroon were drawn into Group E alongside Germany, the Republic of Ireland and Saudi Arabia. Cameroon started with a 1–1 draw with Ireland after giving up the lead and later defeated Saudi Arabia 1–0. In their last game, Cameroon were defeated 2–0 by Germany and were narrowly eliminated by the Irish, who had not lost a game.

The death of a team member

In the 72nd minute of the 2003 FIFA Confederations Cup semi-final between Cameroon and Colombia, midfielder Marc-Vivien Foé collapsed; he was pronounced dead several hours later. In the final against France, Cameroon wore shirts embroidered with Foé's name and dates of birth and death.

Missing out on Germany 2006

In the 2006 World Cup qualifying round, Cameroon were drawn into Group 3 with the Ivory Coast, Egypt, Libya, Sudan and Benin. Cameroon led the group for most of the time until their final game, when Pierre Womé failed to convert a late penalty. On 8 October 2005, Cameroon drew with Egypt 1–1 while the Ivory Coast defeated Sudan 3–1, results which prevented Cameroon from qualifying to the World Cup.

2010 World Cup qualification

In Cameroon's 2010 World Cup qualifying campaign, the team was grouped with Gabon, Togo and Morocco. After a slow start in their campaign with a loss to Togo, the coach of Cameroon, Otto Pfister, resigned. Frenchman Paul Le Guen was appointed as the new coach after a draw against Morocco. Le Guen's appointment caused an uprise in Cameroon's spirits as they earned a win against Gabon in Libreville, followed by another win against the Panthers four days later in Yaoundé. One month later, they defeated Togo in Yaoundé by three goals. On 14 November 2009, Cameroon defeated the Atlas Lions of Morocco 2–0 in Fez in their last match of their campaign. Gabon was also defeated by Togo 1–0 in Lomé. Both results caused Cameroon to qualify for the 2010 World Cup finals, held in South Africa. [5]

The Indomitable Lions were the first team to be mathematically eliminated in the 2010 World Cup, going out in their second group match to Denmark after losing 1–2, preceded by a 0–1 defeat to Japan.

Controversy about sleeveless and one-piece kits

Cameroon used sleeveless Puma shirts at the 2002 African Cup of Nations in Mali. FIFA, however, did not allow Cameroon to use the same kits as at the 2002 World Cup, and black sleeves were added to the shirts. [6] The 2004 African Cup of Nations witnessed Cameroon again run into controversy regarding their kits. Puma had designed a one-piece kit for the Cameroon team which FIFA declared illegal, stating that the kits must have separate shirts and shorts. FIFA then imposed fines on Cameroon and deducted six points from their qualifying campaign. Puma argued that a two-piece kit is not stated as a requirement in the FIFA laws of the game. Puma, however, lost the case in court, and Cameroon were forced to wear two-piece kits, but FIFA subsequently restored the six qualifying points to Cameroon.

2003 Confederations Cup Qualifiers

Cameroon started the 2002 African Cup of Nations competition with a 1–0 win over DR Congo. That was followed by another 1–0 win against Ivory Coast, and a comfortable 3–0 win against Togo. These results led Cameroon to qualify from the group stage to the quarter-finals as their group's winner. In the Knockout stage, Cameroon met Egypt in a close match that they won 1–0 by M'Boma's goal in the 62nd minute of the game. In the Semi-finals, Cameroon met the hosts Mali and won the match 3–0 to qualify to the final.

On 13 February 2002, and after a close match, Cameroon won its fourth African Cup of Nations (repeating as champions), by beating Senegal 3–2 in a penalty shootout after a goalless draw to qualify for the 2003 Confederations Cup in France. [7]

2017 Confederations Cup Qualifiers

Cameroon started the 2017 Africa Cup of Nations competition with a 1–1 draw to Burkina Faso. That was followed by a 2–1 win against Guinea-Bissau, and an unconvincing goalless draw against the hosts Gabon. These results were enough for Cameroon to qualify from the group stage to the quarter-finals, where they met Senegal in a close match that Cameroon won 5–4 in a penalty shootout after it had ended 0–0 after extra time. In the Semi-finals, Cameroon met Ghana and won the match 2–0 to qualify to the final.

On 5 February 2017, and after a close match, Cameroon won the African Cup of Nations for the fifth time after defeating seven-time champions Egypt 2–1 in the final, [8] by Vincent Aboubakar's late goal in the 89th minute of the match. [9] As champions, Cameroon qualified for the 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup in Russia.

Kits and crests

The Cameroon national football team's tradition color is green.

Cameroon national football team had long-term partnership with Puma [10]

Kit suppliers

Kit supplierPeriodNotes
Flag of France.svg Le Coq Sportif 1982–1987
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1988–1993
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mitre 1993–1995
Flag of Italy.svg Lotto 1995–1996
Flag of the United States.svg Nike 1996
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 1997–2018
Flag of France.svg Le Coq Sportif 2019–present

Competitive record

FIFA World CupFIFA World Cup Qualifying
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did Not EnterDid Not Enter
Flag of Italy.svg 1934
Flag of France.svg 1938
Flag of Brazil.svg 1950
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958
Flag of Chile.svg 1962
Flag of England.svg 1966 WithdrewWithdrew
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970 Did Not Qualify201134
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 311113
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 201124
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 Group Stage17th3030118512165
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 Did Not Qualify201125
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 Quarter Finals7th5302798611126
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 Group stage22nd30123118521144
Flag of France.svg 1998 25th3021256420104
Flag of South Korea.svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 20th31112310811204
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 Did Not Qualify106311810
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 Group Stage31st30032512921234
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 32nd3003198521124
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 Did Not Qualify8251109
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determined
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026
TotalQuarter-finals7/2123471218438751231314365

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup record
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGASquad
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1992 Did not qualify
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1995
Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg 1997
Flag of Mexico.svg 1999
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2001 Group stage6th310224 Squad
Flag of France.svg 2003 Runners-up 2nd531131 Squad
Flag of Germany.svg 2005 Did not qualify
Flag of South Africa.svg 2009
Flag of Brazil.svg 2013
Flag of Russia.svg 2017 Group stage7th301226 Squad
TotalRunners-up3/1011425711-

Africa Cup of Nations

Africa Cup of Nations record
Host nation(s) / YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of Sudan (1956-1970).svg 1957 Part of Flag of France.svg  France
Flag of Egypt.svg 1959
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg 1962 Not affiliated to CAF
Flag of Ghana.svg 1963
Flag of Tunisia.svg 1965 Did not enter
Flag of Ethiopia (1897-1936; 1941-1974).svg 1968 Did not qualify
Flag of Sudan (1956-1970).svg 1970 Group stage5th320175
Flag of Cameroon (1961-1975).svg 1972 Third place3rd5311105
Flag of Egypt (1972-1984).svg 1974 Did not qualify
Flag of Ethiopia (1975-1987).svg 1976
Flag of Ghana.svg 1978
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1980
Flag of Libya (1977-2011).svg 1982 Group stage5th303011
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg 1984 Champions1st531193
Flag of Egypt.svg 1986 Runners-up2nd532085
Flag of Morocco.svg 1988 Champions1st532041
Flag of Algeria.svg 1990 Group stage5th310223
Flag of Senegal.svg 1992 Fourth place4th522143
Flag of Tunisia.svg 1994 Did not qualify
Flag of South Africa.svg 1996 Group stage9th311157
Flag of Burkina Faso.svg 1998 Quarter-finals8th421154
Flag of Ghana.svg Flag of Nigeria.svg 2000 Champions1st6321115
Flag of Mali.svg 2002 Champions1st651090
Flag of Tunisia.svg 2004 Quarter-finals6th412176
Flag of Egypt.svg 2006 5th431082
Flag of Ghana.svg 2008 Runners-up2nd6402148
Flag of Angola.svg 2010 Quarter-finals7th411268
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg Flag of Gabon.svg 2012 Did not qualify
Flag of South Africa.svg 2013
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2015 Group stage13th302123
Flag of Gabon.svg 2017 Champions1st633073
Flag of Egypt.svg 2019 Round of 1613th412143
Flag of Cameroon.svg 2021 Qualified as host
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg 2023 To be determined
Flag of Guinea.svg 2025
Total5 Titles19/328441271612375
*Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
**Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.


African Nations Championship
Appearances: 3
YearRoundPositionPldWD*LGFGA
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg 2009 Did not qualify
Flag of Sudan.svg 2011 Quarter-finals5th431050
Flag of South Africa.svg 2014 Did not qualify
Flag of Rwanda.svg 2016 Quarter-finals5th421144
Flag of Morocco.svg 2018 Group stage12th301213
Flag of Cameroon.svg 2020 Qualified as hosts
Flag of Algeria.svg 2022 To be determined
TotalQuarter-finals3/511533107

Summer Olympics

Olympic Games Record
YearResultPositionGPWD*LGSGA
Flag of France.svg 1900
to
Flag of Italy.svg 1960
Did not enter
Flag of Japan.svg 1964
to
Flag of Germany.svg 1972
Did not qualify
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1976 Did not enter
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg 1980 Did not qualify
Flag of the United States.svg 1984 Round 111th310235
Flag of South Korea.svg 1988 Did not qualify
1992–presentSee Cameroon national under-23 football team
TotalRound 11/19310235
Football at the Summer Olympics has been an under-23 tournament since 1992.

African Games

Football at the African Games has been an under-23 tournament since 1991.
African Games Record
YearResultGPWDLGSGA
Flag of the Republic of the Congo.svg 1965 -000000
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1973 -000000
Flag of Algeria.svg 1978 -000000
Flag of Kenya.svg 1987 -000000
1991–presentSee Cameroon national under-23 football team
Total4/4000000

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of match results in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.

  Win  Draw  Lose

2019

25 June 2019 2019 AFCON Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg2–0Flag of Guinea-Bissau.svg  Guinea-Bissau Ismailia, Egypt
19:00 (CAT)
Report Stadium: Ismailia Stadium
Attendance: 5,983
Referee: Noureddine El Jaafari (Morocco)
29 June 2019 2019 AFCON Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg0–0Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana Ismailia, Egypt
19:00 (CAT) Report Stadium: Ismailia Stadium
Attendance: 16,724
Referee: Bamlak Tessema Weyesa (Ethiopia)
2 July 2019 2019 AFCON Benin  Flag of Benin.svg0–0Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon Ismailia, Egypt
18:00 (CAT) Report Stadium: Ismailia Stadium
Referee: Sadok Selmi (Tunisia)
6 July 2019 2019 AFCON Nigeria  Flag of Nigeria.svg3–2Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon Alexandria, Egypt
18:00 (CAT)
Report
Stadium: Alexandria Stadium
Referee: Joshua Bondo (Botswana)
12 October 2019 Friendly Tunisia  Flag of Tunisia.svg0–0Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon Radès, Tunisia
17:00 (UTC±0) Report Stadium: Stade Olympique de Radès
Referee: Nabil Boukhalfa (Algeria)
13 November 2019 2021 AFCONQ Cameroon  Flag of Cameroon.svg0–0Flag of Cape Verde.svg  Cape Verde Yaoundé, Cameroon
17:00  UTC+1 Stadium: Stade Ahmadou Ahidjo
17 November 2019 2021 AFCONQ Rwanda  Flag of Rwanda.svg0–1Flag of Cameroon.svg  Cameroon Kigali, Rwanda
18:00  UTC+2
Stadium: Stade Régional Nyamirambo

Players

Current squad

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Fabrice Ondoa (1995-12-24) 24 December 1995 (age 24)430 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Oostende
231 GK André Onana (1996-04-02) 2 April 1996 (age 24)160 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Ajax
161 GK Haschou Kerrido (1994-06-02) 2 June 1994 (age 26)00 Flag of Guinea.svg CI Kamsar

62 DF Ambroise Oyongo (1991-06-22) 22 June 1991 (age 29)462 Flag of France.svg Montpellier
52 DF Michael Ngadeu-Ngadjui (1990-11-23) 23 November 1990 (age 29)342 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Gent
192 DF Collins Fai (1992-11-23) 23 November 1992 (age 27)330 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Standard Liège
2 DF Allan Nyom (1988-05-10) 10 May 1988 (age 32)180 Flag of Spain.svg Getafe
122 DF Joyskim Dawa (1996-04-09) 9 April 1996 (age 24)60 Flag of Ukraine.svg Mariupol
222 DF Jérôme Onguéné (1997-12-22) 22 December 1997 (age 22)50 Flag of Austria.svg Red Bull Salzburg
212 DF Jean-Charles Castelletto (1995-01-26) 26 January 1995 (age 25)10 Flag of France.svg Brest

113 MF Christian Bassogog (1995-10-18) 18 October 1995 (age 24)305 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Henan Jianye
173 MF Arnaud Djoum (1989-05-02) 2 May 1989 (age 31)250 Flag of Saudi Arabia.svg Al-Raed
83 MF André-Frank Zambo Anguissa (1995-11-16) 16 November 1995 (age 24)242 Flag of Spain.svg Villarreal
33 MF Moumi Ngamaleu (1994-07-09) 9 July 1994 (age 25)193 Flag of Switzerland.svg Young Boys
153 MF Pierre Kunde (1995-07-26) 26 July 1995 (age 24)140 Flag of Germany.svg Mainz 05
3 MF Franck-Yves Bambock (1995-04-07) 7 April 1995 (age 25)00 Flag of Portugal.svg Marítimo

104 FW Vincent Aboubakar (1992-01-22) 22 January 1992 (age 28)6720 Flag of Portugal.svg Porto
134 FW Eric Maxim Choupo-Moting (1989-03-23) 23 March 1989 (age 31)5515 Flag of France.svg Paris Saint-Germain
74 FW Karl Toko Ekambi (1992-09-14) 14 September 1992 (age 27)303 Flag of France.svg Lyon
204 FW Fabrice Olinga (1996-05-12) 12 May 1996 (age 24)191 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Mouscron
94 FW Ignatius Ganago (1999-02-16) 16 February 1999 (age 21)30 Flag of France.svg Nice
4 FW Jean-Pierre Nsame (1993-05-01) 1 May 1993 (age 27)20 Flag of Switzerland.svg Young Boys
144 FW Didier Lamkel Zé (1996-09-17) 17 September 1996 (age 23)10 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Antwerp

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up for the team in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Simon Omossola (1998-05-05) 5 May 1998 (age 22)10 Flag of Cameroon.svg Coton Sport v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
GK Carlos Kameni (1984-02-18) 18 February 1984 (age 36)730 Unattached 2019 Africa Cup of Nations

DF Gaëtan Bong (1988-04-25) 25 April 1988 (age 32)170 Flag of England.svg Nottingham Forest v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
DF Félix Eboa Eboa (1997-04-19) 19 April 1997 (age 23)10 Flag of France.svg Guingamp v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
DF Harold Moukoudi (1997-11-27) 27 November 1997 (age 22)10 Flag of England.svg Middlesbrough v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
DF Tristan Dingomé (1991-02-17) 17 February 1991 (age 29)00 Flag of France.svg Reims v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019 INJ
DF Banana Yaya (1991-07-29) 29 July 1991 (age 28)162 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos 2019 Africa Cup of Nations
DF Jean-Armel Kana-Biyik (1989-07-03) 3 July 1989 (age 30)70 Flag of Turkey.svg Gazişehir Gaziantep 2019 Africa Cup of Nations RET

MF Edgar Salli (1992-08-17) 17 August 1992 (age 27)394 Flag of Romania.svg Sepsi Sfântu Gheorghe v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
MF Paul-Georges Ntep (1992-07-29) 29 July 1992 (age 27)41 Unattached v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
MF Jeando Fuchs (1997-10-11) 11 October 1997 (age 22)20 Flag of Spain.svg Alavés v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
MF Wilfrid Kaptoum (1996-07-07) 7 July 1996 (age 23)00 Flag of Spain.svg Almería v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
MF Georges Mandjeck (1988-12-09) 9 December 1988 (age 31)520 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Sparta Prague 2019 Africa Cup of Nations
MF Olivier Boumal (1989-09-17) 17 September 1989 (age 30)60 Unattached 2019 Africa Cup of Nations

FW Stéphane Bahoken (1992-05-28) 28 May 1992 (age 28)103 Flag of France.svg Angers v. Flag of Tunisia.svg  Tunisia , 12 October 2019
FW Clinton N'Jie (1993-08-15) 15 August 1993 (age 26)329 Flag of Russia.svg Dynamo Moscow 2019 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Jacques Zoua (1991-09-06) 6 September 1991 (age 28)280 Flag of Romania.svg Viitorul Constanța 2019 Africa Cup of Nations
FW Joel Tagueu (1993-11-06) 6 November 1993 (age 26)61 Flag of Portugal.svg Marítimo 2019 Africa Cup of Nations

INJ = Withdrew from this squad due to injury
SUS = Serving suspension
PRE = Preliminary squad / standby
RET = Retired from international football
WD = Withdrew from the squad

Records

As of 28 June 2019
Players in bold text are still active with Cameroon.

Managers

DatesName
1960–1965technical committee
1965–1970 Flag of France.svg Dominique Colonna
1970 Flag of Cameroon.svg Raymond Fobete
1970–1973 Flag of Germany.svg Peter Schnittger
1973–1975 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Vladimir Beara
1976–1979 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Ivan Ridanović
1980–1982 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Branko Žutić
1982 Flag of France.svg Jean Vincent
1982–1984 Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg Radivoje Ognjanović
1985–1988 Flag of France.svg Claude Le Roy
1988–1990 Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Valery Nepomnyashchy
1990–1993 Flag of France.svg Philippe Redon
1993–1994 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jean Manga-Onguéné
DatesName
1994 Flag of Cameroon.svg Léonard Nseké
1994 Flag of France.svg Henri Michel
1994–1996 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jules Nyongha
1996–1997 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Henri Depireux
1997–1998 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jean Manga-Onguéné
1998 Flag of France.svg Claude Le Roy
1998–2001 Flag of France.svg Pierre Lechantre
2001 Flag of France.svg Robert Corfou
2001 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jean-Paul Akono
2001–2004 Flag of Germany.svg Winfried Schäfer
2004–2006 Flag of Portugal.svg Artur Jorge
2006–2007 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Arie Haan
2007 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jules Nyongha
DatesName
2007–2009 Flag of Germany.svg Otto Pfister
2009 Flag of Cameroon.svg Thomas N'Kono
2009–2010 Flag of France.svg Paul Le Guen
2010–2011 Flag of Spain.svg Javier Clemente
2011–2012 Flag of France.svg Denis Lavagne
2012–2013 Flag of Cameroon.svg Jean-Paul Akono
2013–2015 Flag of Germany.svg Volker Finke
2015–2016 Flag of Cameroon.svg Alexandre Belinga
2016–2017 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Hugo Broos
2017–2018 Flag of Cameroon.svg Rigobert Song
2018–2019 Flag of the Netherlands.svg Clarence Seedorf [14]
2019–present Flag of Portugal.svg Toni Conceição [15]

Honours

Quarter-Final (1): 1990
Winners (5): Gold medal africa.svg 1984, Gold medal africa.svg 1988, Gold medal africa.svg 2000, Gold medal africa.svg 2002, Gold medal africa.svg 2017
Runners-up (1): Silver medal africa.svg 2003
Winners (1): Gold medal africa.svg 2000

See also

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The Egypt national football team, known colloquially as The Pharaohs, represents Egypt in men's international football, and is governed by the Egyptian Football Association (EFA), the governing body of football in Egypt. The team's historical stadium is Cairo International Stadium, although they have played at Borg El Arab Stadium in Alexandria in recent years. In 2019, and during the 2019 Africa Cup of Nations, the Pharaohs returned to their historical stadium once again after renovations.

Morocco national football team mens national association football team representing Morocco

The Morocco national football team, nicknamed Les Lions de l'Atlas or Atlas Lions, (French: Équipe du Maroc de football) represents the Kingdom of Morocco in FIFA men's football and it is controlled by the Royal Moroccan Football Federation, also known as FRMF, or in French: Fédération Royale Marocaine de football. the governing body for football in Morocco, The team represents both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Tunisia national football team mens national association football team representing Tunisia

The Tunisia national football team, represents Tunisia in men's international football since their maiden match in 1957. It is governed by the Tunisian Football Federation, founded in 1957 after the Tunisian independence in 1956. Tunisia are colloquially known as Les Aigles de Carthage. The team's colours are red and white, and the Bald eagle its symbol, Periods of regular Tunisian representation at the highest international level, from 1962 to 1978, from 1994 to 2008 and again from 2014 onwards, Most of Tunisia's home matches are played at the Stade Olympique de Radès in Radès since 2001, The team represents both FIFA and CAF.

Ivory Coast national football team National association football team

The Ivory Coast national football team, represents Ivory Coast, formally the Republic of Cote d'Ivoire, in men's international football. Nicknamed the Elephants, the team is managed by the Ivorian Football Federation (FIF). Until 2005, their greatest accomplishment was winning the 1992 Africa Cup of Nations against Ghana on penalties at the Stade Leopold Senghor in Dakar, Senegal. Their second success came in the 2015, again defeating Ghana on penalties in Bata, Equatorial Guinea, The team represents both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Listed below are the dates and results for the 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification rounds for Africa. 51 teams took part, competing for 5 World Cup places.

The Angola national football team represents Angola in men's international football and it is controlled by the Angolan Football Federation, The team made its first appearance in 2006 FIFA World Cup, the team's nickname is Palancas Negras, The team is governing body of Football in Angola in the country, The team represents both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Libya national football team mens national association football team representing Libya

The Libya national football team represents Libya in men's international association football and it is controlled by the Libyan Football Federation. The team has never qualified for FIFA World Cups in history but has qualified for three Africa Cup of Nations: 1982, 2006, and 2012. In 1982, the team was both the host and runner-up. In the Arab Nations Cup, Libya finished second in 1964 and 2012, and third in the 1966. The team is affiliated with both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

Gabon national football team national association football team

The Gabon national football team, represents Gabon in men's international association football, The team's nickname is The Brazilians and it is governed by the Gabonese Football Federation, They have never qualified for the FIFA World Cup, but have qualified seven times for the Africa Cup of Nations, The team represents both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

The Cape Verde national football team represents Cape Verde in men's international association football and is controlled by the Cape Verdean Football Federation. The team has never qualified for FIFA World Cups and The team has qualified for two tournaments of Africa Cup of Nations, 2013 and 2015, They made their first appearance in 2013 and The team also represents both FIFA and Confederation of African Football (CAF).

The Equatorial Guinea national football team, nicknamed Nzalang Nacional, represents Equatorial Guinea in international football and is controlled by the Equatoguinean Football Federation, a member of the Confederation of African Football (CAF).

The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. A total of 197 teams entered the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup. In 2001 FIFA ended automatic qualification of the reigning champion, so that 2002 champions Brazil became first to participate in the qualifying tournament. The hosts (Germany) retained their automatic spot.

The 2002 FIFA World Cup qualification competition was a series of tournaments organised by the six FIFA confederations. Each confederation — the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF, CONMEBOL, OFC (Oceania), and UEFA (Europe) — was allocated a certain number of the 32 places at the tournament. 199 teams entered the tournament qualification rounds, competing for 32 spots in the final tournament. South Korea and Japan, as the co-hosts, and France, as the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 29 spots open for competition.

Otto Pfister German footballer and manager

Otto Martin Pfister is a German football manager and one of Germany's most successful coaching exports, voted Africa's Manager of the Year in 1992. He is formerly the manager of the Afghanistan national team.

The Morocco women's national football team represents Morocco in international women's football and is controlled by the Royal Moroccan Football Federation. The team played its first international match in 1998, as part of the third Women's African Football Championship.

2012 Africa Cup of Nations football tournament

The 2012 Africa Cup of Nations, also known as the Orange Africa Cup of Nations for sponsorship reasons, was the 28th edition of the Africa Cup of Nations, the football championship of Africa organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF).

2017 FIFA Confederations Cup 10th FIFA Confederations Cup, held in Russia

The 2017 FIFA Confederations Cup was the 10th and final FIFA Confederations Cup, a quadrennial international men's football tournament organised by FIFA. It was held in Russia, from 17 June to 2 July 2017, as a prelude to the 2018 FIFA World Cup.

African nations at the FIFA World Cup Participation of national football teams from Africa in the FIFA World Cup

Association football is the most popular sport in nearly every African country, and 13 members of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) have competed at the sport's biggest event – the men's FIFA World Cup.

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