Camp Fuji

Last updated
Camp Fuji
Gotemba, Japan

Usmc camp fuji.jpg

Camp Fuji, with Mount Fuji visible
Type Military base
Site information
Controlled byFlag of the United States Marine Corps.svg  United States Marine Corps

Combined Arms Training Center (CATC) Camp Fuji is an installation of the United States Marine Corps next to the JGSDF Camp Takigahara (Japanese : 滝ヶ原駐屯地). It is located near the town of Gotemba in the Shizuoka Prefecture of Japan, at the base of Mount Fuji. Camp Fuji is one of several Camps of the Marine Corps Base Camp Butler complex.

United States Marine Corps Amphibious warfare branch of the United States Armed Forces

The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines or U.S. Marines, is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for conducting expeditionary and amphibious operations with the United States Navy as well as the Army and Air Force. The U.S. Marine Corps is one of the four armed service branches in the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) and one of the seven uniformed services of the United States.

Japanese is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance.

Gotemba, Shizuoka City in Chūbu, Japan

Gotemba is a city on the southeastern flank of Mount Fuji in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan.

Contents

JGSDF Camp Fuji (Japanese : 富士駐屯地), namesake of this installation, is located 2.5 miles north of the USMC base.

History

The area around the base of Mount Fuji has been associated with the military since medieval times. The samurai of the Kamakura Shogunate conducted military training in this area in the 15th century. In the modern era, the large East Fuji Maneuver Area was established by the Imperial Japanese Army as a training facility, and several training bases were established in the area. After the surrender of Japan at the end of World War II, these bases were occupied by the United States Army, and were designated “Camp Fuji McNair”, “North Camp”, “Middle Camp”, and “South Camp”. Half of “North Camp” was turned over to the United States Marine Corps (USMC) in 1953, while the other half (across the street from present-day Camp Fuji) was eventually turned over to the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force (JGSDF) where it is now JGSDF Camp Takigahara.

Samurai Military nobility of pre-industrial Japan

Samurai (侍) were the military nobility and officer caste of medieval and early-modern Japan.

East Fuji Maneuver Area

JGSDF East Fuji Maneuver Area is the major training grounds for the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force on Honshū, Japan. It is one of several military facilities located in the foothills of Mount Fuji and extends over parts of Gotemba, Susono and Oyama, in Shizuoka Prefecture. Its total area is 88.09 square kilometers.

Imperial Japanese Army Official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan, from 1868 to 1945

The Imperial Japanese Army was the official ground-based armed force of the Empire of Japan from 1868 to 1945. It was controlled by the Imperial Japanese Army General Staff Office and the Ministry of the Army, both of which were nominally subordinate to the Emperor of Japan as supreme commander of the army and the navy. Later an Inspectorate General of Aviation became the third agency with oversight of the army. During wartime or national emergencies, the nominal command functions of the emperor would be centralized in an Imperial General Headquarters (IGHQ), an ad-hoc body consisting of the chief and vice chief of the Army General Staff, the Minister of the Army, the chief and vice chief of the Naval General Staff, the Inspector General of Aviation, and the Inspector General of Military Training.

Description

Marines training at Camp Fuji in 1996. Engaging the Enemy.jpg
Marines training at Camp Fuji in 1996.

The 309-acre (1.25 km2) facility includes 34 acres (140,000 m2) of ranges and maneuver area to serve as a combined arms training area. Camp Fuji is under the exclusive control of the USMC, although the helicopter landing pad is a joint-use facility for both the United States and the JGSDF.

Combined arms military operations and doctrine utilizing different branches in combination

Combined arms is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different combat arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects. According to strategist William S. Lind, combined arms can be distinguished from the concept of "supporting arms" as follows:

Combined arms hits the enemy with two or more arms simultaneously in such a manner that the actions he must take to defend himself from one make him more vulnerable to another. In contrast, supporting arms is hitting the enemy with two or more arms in sequence, or if simultaneously, then in such combination that the actions the enemy must take to defend himself from one also defends himself from the other(s).

Helicopter Type of rotor craft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors

A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forward, backward, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft and many forms of VTOL aircraft cannot perform.

Units from across the Pacific (including those participating in the Unit Deployment Program) come to Camp Fuji to train. The facilities were considered spartan compared to most military bases, with no family housing, limited military exchange and recreation facilities, and limited medical facilities, although extensive modernization and expansion programs from 1983 have added new barracks, enlisted and officers club, a barber shop, library and food facilities.

The Unit Deployment Program (UDP) is a system for assigning deployments of the United States Marine Corps. To reduce the number of unaccompanied tours and improve unit continuity, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, (CMC) established it to provide for the deployment of units to the Western Pacific (WESTPAC) for periods of approximately six months. The initial program was a six-phased evolution that sequenced infantry battalions and aircraft squadrons/detachments into WESTPAC deployments, thus eliminating the 12-month permanent change of station assignments for personnel assigned to these units. The program commenced in October 1977 and has proceeded through the six phases. In August 1985, tank companies began phasing into the program but following Southwest Asia, were discontinued. In Fiscal Year 1987 (FY87) and FY88, Amphibious Assault Vehicle (AAV) companies and direct support artillery batteries were phased in and later, Light Armored Reconnaissance (LAR) companies were also included in the program. The Marine Corps’ objective is to adhere as closely as possible to a six-month period of deployment away from a unit's Continental United States (CONUS) home base. In the case of Hawaii-based infantry battalions, which employ a three-battalion rotation base, a seven-month period of deployment is executed to support the Unit Cohesion Program and efficient staffing of first term Marines. It must be understood, however, that shipping or airlift schedule variations, and exercise or contingency operations will occasionally necessitate longer or shorter deployments for participating units. It is imperative that all personnel involved in these deployments be kept fully informed of planned deployment duration and subsequent deployment schedule changes.

See also

United States Forces Japan American military command stationed in Japan

The United States Forces Japan (USFJ) is an active subordinate unified command of the United States Indo-Pacific Command (USINDOPACOM). It was activated at Fuchū Air Station in Tokyo, Japan on 1 July 1957 to replace the Far East Command (FEC). USFJ is commanded by the Commander, U.S. Forces, Japan (COMUSJAPAN), also commander of the Fifth Air Force. At present, USFJ is headquartered at Yokota Air Base in Tokyo.

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References

This article incorporates text in the public domain from the United States Marine Corps.

Coordinates: 35°19′14″N138°52′07″E / 35.32059°N 138.86873°E / 35.32059; 138.86873