Campbell (Martian crater)

Last updated
Campbell Crater
Wikicampbellmola.jpg
MOLA map showing location of Campbell Crater in relation to other craters. Colors indicate elevations. Campbell is on top of the map
Planet Mars
Region Eridania quadrangle
Coordinates 54°42′S165°36′E / 54.7°S 165.6°E / -54.7; 165.6 Coordinates: 54°42′S165°36′E / 54.7°S 165.6°E / -54.7; 165.6
Diameter 129 km
Eponym William Wallace Campbell
Campbell Crater, as seen by CTX camera (on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter). Wikicampbell.jpg
Campbell Crater, as seen by CTX camera (on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter).
Dust devil tracks, as seen by CTX camera (on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter). Note: this is an enlargement of the previous image of Campbell Crater. Wikicampbelldevilssw.jpg
Dust devil tracks, as seen by CTX camera (on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter). Note: this is an enlargement of the previous image of Campbell Crater.

Campbell Crater is an impact crater in the Eridania quadrangle of Mars, located at 54.7°S latitude and 165.6°E longitude. It is 129.0 km in diameter and was named after Canadian physicist John W. Campbell and American astronomer William Wallace Campbell, and the name was approved in 1973 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN). [1]

Eridania quadrangle

The Eridania quadrangle is one of a series of 30 quadrangle maps of Mars used by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Astrogeology Research Program. The Eridania quadrangle is also referred to as MC-29.

John W. Campbell American science fiction writer and editor

John Wood Campbell Jr. was an American science fiction writer and editor. He was editor of Astounding Science Fiction from late 1937 until his death and was part of the Golden Age of Science Fiction. Campbell wrote super-science space opera under his own name and stories under his primary pseudonym, Don A. Stuart. Campbell also used the pen names Karl Van Kampen and Arthur McCann. His novella Who Goes There? was adapted as the films The Thing from Another World (1951), The Thing (1982), and The Thing (2011).

William Wallace Campbell American astronomer

William Wallace Campbell was an American astronomer, and director of Lick Observatory from 1901 to 1930. He specialized in spectroscopy.

Dust devil tracks have been seen in Campbell Crater. Many areas on Mars experience the passage of giant dust devils. These dust devils leave tracks on the surface of Mars because they disturb a thin coating of fine bright dust that covers most of the Martian surface. When a dust devil goes by it blows away the coating and exposes the underlying dark surface. Within a few weeks, the dark track assumes its former bright color.

See also

Related Research Articles

Kepler (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Kepler is a crater on Mars, located in the Eridania quadrangle at 46.8° S, 140.9° E. It measures approximately 228 kilometres and was named in 1973, by the International Astronomical Union, in honor of the astronomer Johannes Kepler. A section of the floor of Kepler was photographed by the HiRISE camera aboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on 25 March 2006.

Secchi (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Secchi is a crater in the Hellas quadrangle of Mars, located at 58.3° south latitude and 258.1° west longitude. it is 223 km in diameter and was named after Angelo Secchi, an Italian astronomer (1818–1878).

Dust devil tracks

Many areas on Mars experience the passage of giant dust devils. These dust devils leave tracks on the surface of Mars because they disturb a thin coating of fine bright dust that covers most of the Martian surface. When a dust devil goes by it blows away the coating and exposes the underlying dark surface. Within a few weeks, the dark track assumes its former bright colour, either by being re-covered through wind action or due to surface oxidation through exposure to sunlight and the Martian atmosphere.

Brashear (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Brashear Crater is an impact crater in the Thaumasia quadrangle of Mars, located at 54.14 S and 119.03 W. It is 77.45 km in diameter, and was named after John A. Brashear (1840–1920), an American astronomer. The name was approved in 1973.

Danielson (crater) crater on Mars

Danielson Crater is an impact crater in the Oxia Palus quadrangle on Mars at 7.93° N and 7.11° W. and is 66.7 km in diameter, and is north of the Meridiani Planum, south of Arabia Terra and west of the planet's meridia. Its name was approved in 2009, and it was named after American engineer G. Edward Danielson.

Marth (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Marth Crater is an impact crater on Mars, located in the Oxia Palus quadrangle at 13.0° N and 3.5° W. The crater measures approximately is 98 kilometers in diameter. Its name was approved in 1973, and refers to German astronomer Albert Marth. Light and dark markings on the surface are due to dust and sand blown around. Some of the dark sand has formed into dunes.

Wright (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Wright is an impact crater in the Phaethontis quadrangle of Mars, located at 58.9°S latitude and 151.0°W longitude. It measures approximately 114 kilometers in diameter and was named after American astronomer William Hammond Wright (1871–1959). The naming was approved by the IAU in 1973. The Keeler–Trumpler crater pair lies to the south.

Trumpler is a crater in the Phaethontis quadrangle of Mars, located at 61.8°S latitude and 150.8°W longitude. It measures approximately 78 kilometers in diameter and was named after Swiss-American astronomer Robert Julius Trumpler (1886–1956). The name was approved by IAU's Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature in 1973.

Keeler (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Keeler is an impact crater on Mars, located at 61.0°S latitude and 151.3°W longitude in the Phaethontis quadrangle. It is 95.0 km in diameter and was named after James Edward Keeler, and the name was approved in 1973. The first image below shows the relationship among three craters that are near each other. Keeler Crater is to the North of Trumpler Crater. After Keeler was formed, a later impact formed Trumpler Crater, and in the process destroyed part of Keeler.

Liu Hsin (crater) crater on Mars

Liu Hsin Crater is a crater in the Phaethontis quadrangle of Mars, located at 53.6°S latitude and 171.6°W longitude. It is 137.0 km in diameter and was named after Liu Xin. Liu Hsin was a Chinese astronomer, historian, and editor during the Western Han Dynasty and the Xin Dynasty. The name was approved in 1973 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN).

Burton (crater) crater on Mars

Burton is an impact crater in the Memnonia quadrangle of Mars, located at 13.9°S latitude and 156.3°W longitude. It is 123.0 km in diameter and was named after British astronomer Charles E. Burton; the name was approved in 1973.

Wells (crater) crater on Mars

Wells is an impact crater in the Eridania quadrangle on Mars at 60.2°S and 237.9°W. It measures approximately 98 kilometers in diameter. The crater was named after English writer H. G. Wells (1866–1946). The name was approved in 1973, by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.

Clark (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Clark Crater is a crater in the Phaethontis quadrangle of Mars, located at 55.6°S latitude and 133.4°W longitude. It is 98.0 km in diameter. It was named after American astronomer Alvan Clark; the name was approved in 1973.

Fontana (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Fontana is a crater in the Thaumasia quadrangle of Mars, located at 63.2°S latitude and 72.2°W longitude. It is 80.0 km in diameter and was named after Francesco Fontana, and the name was approved in 1973 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN). The picture below shows dust devil tracks and dunes on the crater's floor.

Redi (crater) crater on Mars

Redi is an impact crater Mars, located in the Hellas quadrangle at 60.6°S latitude and 267.3°W longitude. The crater measures 62 kilometers in diameter and was named after 17th century Italian physician Francesco Redi. The name was approved by IAU's Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature in 1973. Redi Crater displays dust devil tracks. Part of its floor is covered by a smooth deposit called "latitude dependent mantle."

Smith (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Smith is an impact crater on Mars, located in the Mare Australe quadrangle at 66.1°S latitude and 102.9°W longitude. It measures 74.33 kilometers in diameter and was named after English geologist William Smith (1769–1839). The name was approved in 1973, by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.

Lau (crater) crater on Mars

Lau Crater is an impact crater in the Mare Australe quadrangle of Mars, located at 74.4°S latitude and 107.8°W longitude. It is 104.9 km in diameter. It was named after Danish astronomer Hans E. Lau, and the name was approved in 1973 by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN).

Main (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Main is an impact crater on Mars, located in the Mare Australe quadrangle at 76.6°S latitude and 310.9°W longitude. It measures 109.0 kilometers in diameter and was named after Rev. Robert Main. The name was approved in 1973, by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN). The floor of Main shows dark portions which are caused by pressurized carbon dioxide blowing dust in the atmosphere in the spring when the temperature goes up. Some of the dust is shaped into streaks if there is a wind.

Schmidt (Martian crater) crater on Mars

Schmidt is an impact crater on Mars, located in the Mare Australe quadrangle at 72.3°S latitude and 78.1°W longitude. It measures approximately 201 kilometers in diameter. It was named after German astronomer J. F. Julius Schmidt and Russian geophysicist Otto Schmidt. The naming was officially approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature in 1973.

Joly is an impact crater on Mars, located at 74.7°S latitude and 42.7°W longitude in the Mare Australe quadrangle. It measures 79.9 kilometers in diameter and was named after Irish physicist John Joly (1857–1933). The name was approved in 1973, by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN).

References

  1. "Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature | Campbell". usgs.gov. International Astronomical Union . Retrieved 4 March 2015.