Cannon-class destroyer escort

Last updated
USS Cannon (DE-99) underway in Delaware Bay on 5 September 1943 (NH 83390).jpg
USS Cannon (DE-99)
Class overview
Name:Cannon class
Operators:
Preceded by: Buckleyclass
Succeeded by: Edsallclass
Planned: 116
Completed: 72
Cancelled: 44
Active: 1 (Royal Thai Navy)
Preserved: 3
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer Escort
Displacement:
  • 1,240  tons standard
  • 1,620 tons full load
Length:93.3 m (306 ft)
Beam:11 m (36 ft)
Draft:3.5 m (11 ft) full load
Propulsion:
Speed: 21 knots (39 km/h)
Range: 10,800 nautical miles (20,000 km; 12,400 mi) at 12 knots (22 km/h)
Complement:
  • 15 officers
  • 201 enlisted men
Armament:

The Cannon class was a class of destroyer escorts built by the United States primarily for ocean antisubmarine warfare escort service during World War II. The lead ship, USS Cannon, was commissioned on 26 September 1943 at Wilmington, Delaware. Of the 116 ships ordered, 44 were cancelled and six were commissioned directly into the Free French Forces. Destroyer escorts were regular companions escorting the vulnerable cargo ships.

Contents

With the decommissioning of the Philippine Navy's BRP Rajah Humabon (PS-11) in March 2018, and that of HTMS Pin Klao (DE-1) of the Royal Thai Navy, in the September 2008 no ship of this class is in commission.

Propulsion

The class was also known as the DET type from their diesel electric tandem drives. [1] The DET's substitution for a turboelectric propulsion plant was the primary difference with the predecessor Buckley ("TE") class. [2] The DET was, in turn, replaced with a direct-drive diesel plant to yield the design of the successor Edsall ("FMR") class. [3]

Hull numbers

A total of 72 ships of the Cannon class were built.

Wartime transfers

During World War II, six ships of the class were earmarked for the Free French Naval Forces and a further eight were transferred the Brazilian Navy.

Free French ships

Transferred to Brazil

Postwar dispersal

After the end of World War II, the United States Navy transferred many ships of the Cannon class to other navies.

Transferred to France

Transferred to Greece

Transferred to Italy

Transferred to Japan

Transferred to the Netherlands

Transferred to Peru

Transferred to the Philippines

BRP Rajah Humabon (PF-11) of the Philippine Navy BRP Rajah Humabon (PF 11).jpg
BRP Rajah Humabon (PF-11) of the Philippine Navy

Transferred to South Korea

Transferred to the Republic of China (Taiwan)

Transferred to Thailand

Transferred to Uruguay

Ships in Class

Ship NameHull No.BuilderLaid downLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
Cannon DE-99 Dravo Corporation, Wilmington, Delaware 14 November 194225 May 194326 September 194319 December 1944to Brazil 19 December 1944 as Baependi; scrapped 1975
Christopher DE-1007 December 194219 June 194323 October 194319 December 1944to Brazil 19 December 1944 as Benevente; scrapped 1964
Alger DE-1012 January 19438 July 194312 November 194310 March 1945to Brazil 10 March 1945 as Babitonga; scrapped 1964
Thomas DE-10216 January 194331 July 194321 November 194313 March 1946Completed at Norfolk Navy Yard. To Taiwan as Taihe (DE-23) 29 October 1948; scrapped 1972
Bostwick DE-1036 February 194330 August 19431 December 194330 April 1946to Taiwan as Taicang (DE-25) 14 December 1948; scrapped 1972
Breeman DE-10420 March 19434 September 194312 December 194326 April 1946Completed at Norfolk Navy Yard. To Taiwan as Taihu (DE-24) 29 October 1948; scrapped 1972
Burrows DE-10524 March 19432 October 194319 December 194314 June 1946to the Netherlands as Van Amstel (F806) 1 June 1950; scrapped 1968
Carter DE-11219 November 194329 February 19443 May 194410 April 1946to Taiwan Taizhao (DE-26) 14 December 1948; scrapped 1973
Clarence L. Evans DE-11323 December 194322 March 194425 June 194429 May 1947Transferred to France as Berbère (F723) 29 March 1952; scrapped 1960
Levy DE-162 Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Port Newark, New Jersey 19 October 194228 March 194313 May 19434 April 1947Struck from Navy List 2 August 1973, sold for scrap 17 July 1974
McConnell DE-16319 October 194228 March 194328 May 194329 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 October 1972, sold for scrap 21 March 1974
Osterhaus DE-16411 November 194218 April 194312 June 194326 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 November 1972, sold for scrap 30 May 1974
Parks DE-16511 November 194218 April 194322 June 1943March 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 15 October 1973
Baron DE-16630 November 19429 May 19435 July 194326 April 1946to Uruguay as Uruguay (DE-1) 3 May 1952; scrapped 1990
Acree DE-16730 November 19429 May 194319 July 19431 April 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 19 July 1973
Amick DE-16830 November 194227 May 194326 July 194316 May 1947to Japan as Asahi (DE-262) 14 June 1955; returned 1975. Transferred to the Philippines as Datu Sikatuna (PF-5); scrapped 1989
Atherton DE-16914 January 194327 May 194329 August 194310 December 1945to Japan as Hatsuhi (DE-263) 14 June 1955; returned 1975. Transferred to the Philippines as Rajah Humabon (PF-11); retired in 2018
Booth DE-17030 January 194321 June 194319 September 194314 June 1946to the Philippines as Datu Kalantiaw (PF-76/FF-170) 15 December 1967. Lost during Typhoon Clara 21 September 1981
Carroll DE-17130 January 194321 June 194324 October 194319 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1965, sold for scrap 29 December 1966
Cooner DE-17222 February 194325 July 194321 August 194325 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 1 November 1973
Eldridge DE-17322 February 194325 July 194327 August 194317 June 1946to Greece 15 January 1951, renamed Leon (D-54); scrapped 1999
Marts DE-17426 April 19438 August 19433 September 194320 March 1945to Brazil 20 March 1945 as Bocaina (D-22); scrapped 1975
Pennewill DE-17526 April 19438 August 194315 September 19431 August 1944to Brazil 1 August 1944 as Bertioga (D-21); scrapped 1975
Micka DE-1763 May 194322 August 194323 September 194314 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1965, sold for scrap 15 May 1967
Reybold DE-1773 May 194322 August 194329 September 194315 August 1944to Brazil 15 August 1944 as Bracui (D-18); scrapped 1972
Herzog DE-17817 May 19435 September 19436 October 19431 August 1944to Brazil 1 August 1944 as Beberibe (D-23); scrapped 1968
McAnn DE-17917 May 19435 September 194311 October 194315 August 1944to Brazil 15 August 1944 as Bauru; museum ship in Rio de Janeiro
Trumpeter DE-1807 June 194319 September 194316 October 19435 December 1947Struck from Navy List 1 August 1973, sold for scrap 18 June 1974
Straub DE-1817 June 194319 September 194325 October 194317 October 1947Struck from Navy List 1 August 1973, sold for scrap 17 July 1974
Gustafson DE-1825 July 19433 October 19431 November 194326 June 1946to the Netherlands as Van Ewijk (F808) 23 October 1950; scrapped 1968
Samuel S. Miles (ex-Miles) DE-1835 July 19433 October 19434 November 194328 March 1946to France as Arabe (F717) 12 August 1950; scrapped 1968
Wesson DE-18429 July 194317 October 194311 November 194325 July 1946to Italy as Andromeda (F592) 10 January 1951; scrapped 1972
Riddle DE-18529 July 194317 October 194317 November 19438 June 1946to France as Kabyle (F718) 12 August 1950; scrapped 1959
Swearer DE-18612 August 194331 October 194324 November 194325 February 1946to France as Bambara (F719) 16 September 1950; scrapped 1959
Stern DE-18712 August 194331 October 19431 December 194316 April 1946to the Netherlands as Van Zijll (F811) 1 March 1951; scrapped 1968
O'Neill DE-18826 August 194314 November 19436 December 19432 May 1946to the Netherlands as Du Bois (F809) 23 October 1950; scrapped 1968
Bronstein DE-18926 August 194314 November 194313 December 19435 November 1945to Uruguay as Artigas (DE-2) 3 May 1952; scrapped 1988
Baker (ex-Raby) DE-1909 September 194328 November 194323 December 19434 March 1946to France as Malgache (F724) 29 March 1952; sunk as target 1970
Coffman DE-1919 September 194328 November 194327 December 194330 April 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 17 August 1973
Eisner DE-19223 September 194312 December 19431 January 194415 July 1946to the Netherlands as De Zeeuw (F810) 1 March 1951; scrapped 1968
Garfield Thomas (ex-William G. Thomas) DE-19323 September 194312 December 194324 January 194427 March 1947to Greece as Panthir (D-67) 15 January 1951; out of service 1991, scrapped
Wingfield DE-1947 October 194330 December 194328 January 194426 August 1947to France as Sakalave (F720) 15 September 1950; scrapped 1960
Thornhill DE-1957 October 194330 December 19431 February 194417 June 1947to Italy as Aldebaran (F590) 10 January 1951; scrapped 1976
Rinehart DE-19621 October 19439 January 194412 February 194417 July 1946to the Netherlands as De Bitter (F807) 1 June 1950; scrapped 1968
Roche DE-19721 October 19439 January 194421 February 1944N/ADamaged by sea mine northwest of Eniwetok 22 August 1945; not repaired and sunk off Yokosuka 11 March 1946.
Bangust DE-739 Western Pipe and Steel Company, San Pedro, California 11 February 19436 June 194330 October 194317 November 1946Transferred to Peru as Castilla (F-61) 21 February 1952; scrapped 1979
Waterman DE-74024 February 194320 June 194330 November 194331 May 1946to Peru as Aguirre (DE-62) 21 February 1952; sunk as target 1974
Weaver DE-74113 March 19434 July 194331 December 194329 May 1947to Peru as Rodriguez 21 February 1952; scrapped 1979
Hilbert DE-74223 March 194318 July 19434 February 194419 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 15 October 1973
Lamons DE-74310 April 19431 August 194329 February 194414 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 15 October 1973
Kyne DE-74416 April 194315 August 19434 April 194414 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 1 November 1973
21 November 195017 June 1960
Snyder DE-74528 April 194329 August 19435 May 19445 May 1960Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 1 November 1973
Hemminger DE-7465 May 194312 September 194330 May 194417 June 1946Transferred to Thailand as Pin Klao (DE-1) 22 July 1959.
1 December 195021 February 1958
Bright DE-7479 June 194326 September 194330 June 194419 April 1946Transferred to France as Touareg (F721) 11 November 1950; scrapped 1965
Tills DE-74823 June 19433 October 19438 August 194414 June 1946Struck from Navy List 23 September 1968. Sunk as target on 3 April 1969
21 November 195018 October 1959
1 October 196123 September 1968
Roberts DE-7497 July 194314 November 19432 September 194421 September 1968Struck from Navy List 23 September 1968, sunk as target in November 1971
McClelland DE-75021 July 194328 November 194319 September 194415 May 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 1 November 1973
14 July 195012 September 1960
Cates DE-763 Tampa Shipbuilding Company, Tampa, Florida 1 March 194310 October 194315 December 194328 March 1947to France as Soudanais (F722) 11 November 1950; scrapped 1959
Gandy DE-7641 March 194312 December 19437 February 194417 June 1946to Italy as Altair (F591) 10 January 1951; sunk as target 1971
Earl K. Olsen DE-7659 March 194313 February 194410 April 194417 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 15 October 1973
21 November 195025 February 1958
Slater DE-7669 March 194313 February 19441 May 194426 September 1947to Greece as Aetos (D-01) 1 March 1951; retired 1991. Since 1993 museum ship in Albany, New York
Oswald DE-7671 April 194325 April 194412 June 194430 April 1946Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 15 October 1973
Ebert DE-7681 April 194311 May 194412 July 194414 June 1946to Greece as Ierax (D-31) 1 March 1951; sunk as target 2002
Neal A. Scott DE-7691 June 19434 June 194431 July 194430 April 1946Struck from Navy List 1 June 1968, sold for scrap in July 1969
Muir DE-7701 June 19434 June 194430 August 1944September 1947to South Korean as Kyongki (F-71) 2 February 1956; to the Philippines for spare parts 1977
Sutton DE-77123 August 19436 August 194422 December 194419 March 1948to South Korean as Kang Won (F-72) 2 February 1956; to the Philippines for spare parts 1977

See also

Related Research Articles

Destroyer escort United States Navy mid-20th century ship classification

Destroyer escort (DE) was the United States Navy mid-20th-century classification for a 20-knot (23 mph) warship designed with endurance to escort mid-ocean convoys of merchant marine ships. Kaibōkan were designed for a similar role in the Imperial Japanese Navy. The Royal Navy and Commonwealth forces identified such warships as frigates, and that classification was widely accepted when the United States redesignated destroyer escorts as frigates (FF) in 1975. From circa 1954 until 1975 new-build US Navy ships designated as destroyer escorts (DE) were called ocean escorts. Destroyer escorts, frigates, and kaibōkan were mass-produced for World War II as a less expensive antisubmarine warfare alternative to fleet destroyers. Other similar warships include the 10 Kriegsmarine escort ships of the F-class and the two Amiral Murgescu-class vessels of the Romanian Navy.

<i>Buckley</i>-class destroyer escort class of destroyer escorts

The Buckley-class destroyer escorts were 102 destroyer escorts launched in the United States in 1943–44. They served in World War II as convoy escorts and anti-submarine warfare ships. The lead ship was USS Buckley which was launched on 9 January 1943. The ships had General Electric steam turbo-electric transmission. The ships were prefabricated at various factories in the United States, and the units brought together in the shipyards, where they were welded together on the slipways.

<i>Edsall</i>-class destroyer escort ship class

The Edsall-class destroyer escorts were destroyer escorts built primarily for ocean antisubmarine escort service during World War II. The lead ship, USS Edsall, was commissioned on 10 April 1943 at Orange, Texas. The class was also known as the FMR type from their Fairbanks-Morse reduction-geared diesel drive, with a type of engine used in the submarines of the time. The FMR's substitution for a diesel-electric power plant was the essential difference from the predecessor Cannon ("DET") class. This was the only World War II destroyer escort class in which all the ships originally ordered were completed as United States Navy destroyer escorts. Destroyer escorts were regular companions escorting the vulnerable cargo ships. Late in the war, plans were made to replace the 3-inch (76 mm) guns with 5-inch (127 mm) guns, but only Camp was refitted. In total, all 85 were completed by two shipbuilding companies: Consolidated Steel Corporation, Orange, Texas (47), and Brown Shipbuilding, Houston, Texas (38). Most were en route to the Pacific Theater when Japan surrendered. One of the ships participated in Operation Dragoon and two were attacked by German guided missiles.

USS <i>Atherton</i> Cannon-class destroyer escort

USS Atherton (DE-169), a Cannon-class destroyer escort, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Lt. (jg) John McDougal Atherton, who died when USS Meredith sank near Guadalcanal during World War II.

USS <i>Amick</i> Cannon-class destroyer escort

USS Amick (DE-168) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and then the Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS Hemminger (DE-746) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. She was named in honor of Cyril Franklin Hemminger who was killed during the Battle of Savo Island.

USS <i>Ebert</i> (DE-768)

USS Ebert (DE-768) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

BRP <i>Dagupan City</i> (LS-551)

The BRP Dagupan City (LS-551) is the second and last ship of two Bacolod City class logistics support vessel, and is based on a helicopter capable variant of the US Army Frank S. Besson class. She is also considered as one of the most modern transport ships in the Philippine Navy, having been commissioned during the early 1990s. She was previously known as BRP Dagupan City (LC-551) prior to a classification change implemented by the Philippine Navy starting April 2016

BRP <i>Rajah Humabon</i> (PS-11)

The BRP Rajah Humabon (PS-11) is a former destroyer escort of the United States Navy and a former frigate of the Philippine Navy. It was the last World War II-era destroyer escort/frigate active in its fleet, and one of the oldest active warships in the world, until 15 March 2018 when it was formally decommissioned after 75 years. She was one of three ex-USN Cannon-class destroyer escorts that served the Philippine Navy, the others being BRP Datu Sikatuna (PF-5/PS-77) and BRP Datu Kalantiaw (PS-76).

BRP <i>Datu Kalantiaw</i> (PS-76)

BRP Datu Kalantiaw (PS-76) was the first of three ex-USN Cannon-class destroyer escorts that served with the Philippine Navy, the others being BRP Datu Sikatuna (PS-77/PF-5) and BRP Rajah Humabon (PS-78/PF-11). She was also the flagship of the Philippine Navy from 1967 to 1981.

BRP <i>Miguel Malvar</i>

BRP Miguel Malvar (PS-19) is the lead ship of the Miguel Malvar class of corvettes of the Philippine Navy. She was originally built as USS Brattleboro PCE(R)-852, a PCE(R)-848-class rescue patrol craft escort for the United States Navy during World War II. She was acquired by the Philippine Navy in April 1976 and later on commissioned as Miguel Malvar after Miguel Malvar y Carpio. The ship is in active service. Along with other World War II-era ships of the Philippine Navy, Miguel Malvar is one of the oldest active fighting ships in the world today.

BRP <i>Sultan Kudarat</i>

BRP Sultan Kudarat (PS-22) was a Miguel Malvar-class corvette of the Philippine Navy. She was originally built as USS PCE-881, a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was acquired by the Philippine Navy on April 1976, and was commissioned later on as RPS Sultan Kudarat (PS-22). The ship is in active service. Along with other World War II-era ships of the Philippine Navy, Sultan Kudarat was considered as one of the oldest active fighting ships in the world, until her retirement in 05 July 2019.

The BRP Datu Sikatuna (PF-5) was one of the three ex-USN Cannon-class destroyer escorts that served with the Philippine Navy, the others being BRP Datu Kalantiaw (PS-76) and BRP Rajah Humabon (PF-11).

BRP <i>Cebu</i>

BRP Cebu (PS-28) was a Miguel Malvar-class corvette of the Philippine Navy. She was originally built as USS PCE-881, a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II and patrolled the Alaskan coast during that war. She was decommissioned from the U.S. Navy and transferred to the Philippine Navy in July 1948 and renamed RPS Cebu (E-28) after the Philippine province of the same name. The ship was decommissioned on October 1, 2019. Along with other World War II-era ships of the Philippine Navy, Cebu was considered as one of the oldest active fighting ships in the world.

BRP <i>Iloilo</i>

BRP Iloilo (PS-32) was a Miguel Malvar-class corvette of the Philippine Navy. She was originally built as USS PCE-897, a PCE-842-class patrol craft for the United States Navy during World War II. She was decommissioned from the U.S. Navy and transferred to the Philippine Navy in July 1948 and renamed RPS Iloilo (E-32) after the Philippine province of the same name. The ship is in active service. Along with other World War II-era ships of the Philippine Navy, Iloilo was considered as one of the oldest active fighting ships in the world, being in continuously in service for 68 years.

BRP <i>Rajah Lakandula</i> (PF-4)

BRP Rajah Lakandula (PF-4) was a destroyer escort / frigate of the Philippine Navy, and was its only ex-USN Edsall-class destroyer escort. She was also the flagship of the Philippine Navy from 1981 to 1988.

The Van Amstel-class was a class of 6 frigates that were built during the Second World War in the United States and served as destroyer Escort during that war. After the war the destroyer escorts were loaned to the Dutch navy as part of the MDAP and from 1950 to 1967 served as the Van Amstel-class frigates.

French frigate <i>Hova</i>

Hova, was a frigate in the Free French Naval Forces during World War II and the French Navy post-war. The ship was originally built as USS Hova (DE-110), an American Cannon-class destroyer escort.

References

  1. U.S. Destroyers: an illustrated design history by Norman Friedman. Chapter 7. ISBN   1-55750-442-3.
  2. Rivet, Eric; Stenzel, Michael (April 22, 2011). "Classes of Destroyer Escorts". History of Destroyer Escorts. Destroyer Escort Historical Museum. Retrieved July 8, 2012. The Cannon class was very similar in design to the Buckley class, the primary difference being a diesel-electric power plant instead of the Buckley class's turboelectric design. The fuel-efficient diesel-electric plant greatly improved the range of the Cannon class, but at the cost of speed.
  3. Rivet, Eric; Stenzel, Michael (April 22, 2011). "Classes of Destroyer Escorts". History of Destroyer Escorts. Destroyer Escort Historical Museum. Retrieved July 8, 2012. Except for the propulsion, the EDSALL class was nearly identical to the CANNON class in every respect. This fourth class of destroyer escorts mounted a direct-drive diesel configuration that proved to be extremely reliable.