Canton (country subdivision)

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A canton is a type of administrative division of a country. [1] In general, cantons are relatively small in terms of area and population when compared with other administrative divisions such as counties, departments, or provinces. Internationally, the best-known cantons - and the most politically important - are those of Switzerland. As the constituents of the Swiss Confederation, theoretically (and historically), the Swiss cantons are semi-sovereign states.

Contents

The term is derived from the French word canton , meaning corner or district (from which "Cantonment" is also derived). [2]

In specific countries

Cantons exist (or existed) in the following countries:

In former countries

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References

  1. Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Canton"  . Encyclopædia Britannica . 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 221.
  2. Oxford English Dictionary cantonment and canton, v.