Cape Agassiz

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Brabazon Point
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Location Graham Land, Palmer Land
Coordinates 68°29′S62°56′W / 68.483°S 62.933°W / -68.483; -62.933 Coordinates: 68°29′S62°56′W / 68.483°S 62.933°W / -68.483; -62.933
Area Antarctica

Cape Agassiz is the east tip of Hollick-Kenyon Peninsula, a narrow ice-drowned spur extending east from the main mountain axis of Antarctic Peninsula between Mobiloil Inlet and Revelle Inlet. The cape is the east end of a line from Cape Jeremy dividing Graham Land and Palmer Land. It was discovered in December 1940 by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) who named it for W.L.G. Joerg, a geographer and polar specialist. At his request it was named by the US-SCAN for Louis Agassiz, an internationally famous American naturalist and geologist of Swiss origin, who first propounded the theory of continental glaciation (Etudes sur les Glaciers, Neuchatel, 1840). The latitude is 68 degrees, 28 minutes, south.

Hollick-Kenyon Peninsula or Kenyon Peninsula is an ice-covered spur from the main mountain mass of the Antarctic Peninsula, projecting over 40 nautical miles (70 km) in a northeasterly arc from its base between Mobiloil Inlet and Casey Inlet. It was discovered and partially photographed from the air by Lincoln Ellsworth on his 1935 trans-Antarctic flight from Dundee Island to the Ross Sea. In 1940 it was photographed from the air and charted from the ground by the US Antarctic Service.

Antarctic Peninsula peninsula

The Antarctic Peninsula, known as O'Higgins Land in Chile, Tierra de San Martin in Argentina, and originally known as the Palmer Peninsula in the US and as Graham Land in Great Britain, is the northernmost part of the mainland of Antarctica, located at the base of the Southern Hemisphere.

Mobiloil Inlet is an ice-filled inlet, nurtured by several northeast and east flowing glaciers, lying between the Rock Pile Peaks and Hollick-Kenyon Peninsula along the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. It was discovered by Sir Hubert Wilkins in a flight on December 20, 1928, and named by him after a product of the Vacuum Oil Company of Australia. Yates Spur, a prominent rock spur, projects from the south side of the inlet.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Cape Agassiz" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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Thurston Island is an ice-covered, glacially dissected island, 215 km (134 mi) long, 90 km (56 mi) wide and 15,700 km2 (6,062 sq mi) in area, lying a short way off the northwest end of Ellsworth Land, Antarctica. It is the third largest island of Antarctica, after Alexander Island and Berkner Island.

Graham Land geographical object

Graham Land is the portion of the Antarctic Peninsula that lies north of a line joining Cape Jeremy and Cape Agassiz. This description of Graham Land is consistent with the 1964 agreement between the British Antarctic Place-names Committee and the US Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names, in which the name "Antarctic Peninsula" was approved for the major peninsula of Antarctica, and the names Graham Land and Palmer Land for the northern and southern portions, respectively. The line dividing them is roughly 69 degrees south.

Palmer Land geographic region

Palmer Land is the portion of the Antarctic Peninsula, Antarctica that lies south of a line joining Cape Jeremy and Cape Agassiz. This application of Palmer Land is consistent with the 1964 agreement between US-ACAN and UK-APC, in which the name Antarctic Peninsula was approved for the major peninsula of Antarctica, and the names Graham Land and Palmer Land for the northern and southern portions, respectively. The line dividing them is roughly 69 degrees south.

Bowman Coast

The Bowman Coast is the portion of the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula between Cape Northrop and Cape Agassiz. It was discovered by Sir Hubert Wilkins in an aerial flight of December 20, 1928. It was named by Wilkins for Isaiah Bowman, then Director of the American Geographical Society.

Cape Hallett Antarctic base

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Bowman Peninsula is a peninsula, 46 kilometres (25 nmi) long in a north-south direction and 28 kilometres (15 nmi) wide in its northern and central portions, lying between Nantucket Inlet and Gardner Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. The peninsula is ice covered and narrows toward the south, terminating in Cape Adams. It was discovered by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, 1947–48, under Finn Ronne, who named it for Isaiah Bowman.

Wilkins Coast beach

Wilkins Coast is that portion of the east coast of the Antarctic Peninsula between Cape Agassiz and Cape Boggs. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Sir Hubert Wilkins, who in a pioneer Antarctic exploratory flight on December 20, 1928, flew southward from Deception Island and crossed the Antarctic Peninsula to its east side. He continued southward to Stefansson Strait and Hearst Island, which lie midway along Wilkins Coast.

Cape Disappointment (Antarctica) headland in Graham Land, Antarctica

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Churchill Peninsula

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Eielson Peninsula is a rugged, mainly snow-covered peninsula, 37 kilometres (20 nmi) long in an east–west direction and averaging 19 kilometres (10 nmi) wide, lying between Smith Inlet and Lehrke Inlet on the east coast of Palmer Land. The rocky north wall of this peninsula is probably the feature which, on his flight of December 20, 1928, Sir Hubert Wilkins sighted and named "Cape Eielson" from a position above Stefansson Strait. This rock wall is conspicuous in the aerial photographs of the peninsula taken by members of the United States Antarctic Service in 1940 from an aerial position at the north side of Stefansson Strait. The peninsula is named for Carl B. Eielson, the pilot on Wilkins' flight of 1928.

Mossman Inlet is a narrow ice-filled inlet which recedes north 19 kilometres (10 nmi) between Cape Kidson and the southwest end of Kemp Peninsula, along the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. This inlet was first seen and photographed from the air in December 1940 by the United States Antarctic Service, and during 1947 it was photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) charted it from the ground. It was named by the FIDS for British meteorologist and climatologist Robert C. Mossman, 1870–1940, a member of the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition under William Speirs Bruce, 1902–04.

Cape Little is a cape at the eastern extremity of the peninsula between Wright Inlet and Keller Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was probably seen from the air by members of the United States Antarctic Service who photographed Wright Inlet in December 1940. The cape was photographed from the air during 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE) under Finn Ronne, who in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey charted it from the ground. It was named by Ronne for Delbert M. Little, Assistant Chief for Operations, U.S. Weather Bureau, who arranged the program for sending weather reports from the RARE.

Cape Mackintosh is a low, ice-covered cape forming the northern tip of Kemp Peninsula and the east entrance point to Mason Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was probably first seen by members of the United States Antarctic Service who photographed a portion of Kemp Peninsula while exploring this coast from the air in December 1940. During 1947 the cape was photographed by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition, which in conjunction with the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) surveyed it from the ground. The cape was named by the FIDS after Neil A. Mackintosh (1900–74), a British marine biologist, oceanographer, and authority on Antarctic whales. Mackintosh was a member of the Discovery Investigations scientific staff from 1924 and Chief Scientific Officer from 1929 to 1949; from 1949 to 1961 he was Deputy Director of the National Institute of Oceanography.

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Sobral Peninsula

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Cape Howard is a high, flat-topped, snow-covered cape at the extremity of the peninsula separating Lamplugh Inlet and Odom Inlet, on the east coast of Palmer Land, Antarctica. It was discovered by members of the United States Antarctic Service who explored along this coast by land and from the air in 1940, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for August Howard, founder of the American Polar Society and editor of The Polar Times.

Revelle Inlet is a broad, ice-filled inlet which recedes west some 15 nautical miles (28 km) between Cape Agassiz and Cape Keeler, along the east coast of Palmer Land. The inlet lies in the area explored from the air by Sir Hubert Wilkins in 1928 and Lincoln Ellsworth in 1935, but it was first charted by the United States Antarctic Service (USAS) in 1940. It was resighted by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), 1947–48, under Ronne, who named it for Roger Revelle, oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, who gave technical assistance during the fitting out of the Ronne expedition.

Cape Freeman is a cape marking the east end of the peninsula separating Seligman Inlet and Trail Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. The cape was photographed from the air in 1940 by the U.S. Antarctic Service. It was charted in 1947 by the Falklands Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), who named it for R.L. Freeman, a FIDS surveyor at the Stonington Island base.