Cape Selborne

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Cape Selborne ( 80°23′S160°45′E / 80.383°S 160.750°E / -80.383; 160.750 Coordinates: 80°23′S160°45′E / 80.383°S 160.750°E / -80.383; 160.750 ) is a high snow-covered cape at the south side of Barne Inlet, the terminus of Byrd Glacier at the west side of the Ross Ice Shelf. Discovered by the Discovery expedition (1901–04) and named for William Waldegrave Palmer Selborne, Second Earl of Selborne, who entered the Cabinet as First Lord of the Admiralty in 1900. Cape Selborne marks the boundary between the Shackleton Coast to the south and the Hillary Coast to the north.

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Barne Inlet is a reentrant about 17 nautical miles (30 km) wide occupied by the lower part of Byrd Glacier, lying between Cape Kerr and Cape Selborne on the west side of the Ross Ice Shelf. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04) and named for Lieutenant Michael Barne, Royal Navy, a member of the expedition, who with Sub-Lieutenant George Mulock mapped the coastline this far south in 1903.

Byrd Glacier glacier in Antarctica

The Byrd Glacier is a major glacier in Antarctica, about 136 km long and 24 km wide, draining an extensive area of the polar plateau and flowing eastward between the Britannia Range and Churchill Mountains to discharge into the Ross Ice Shelf at Barne Inlet. Its valley below the glacier is the lowest point not to covered by water on Earth which reaches 2,780 m below sea level. It was named by the NZ-APC after Rear Admiral Byrd, US Navy, American Antarctic explorer.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Cape Selborne" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.


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