Capture of Bougie

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Capture of Bougie
Part of The Ottoman–Habsburg wars
Algiers and Bejaia by Piri Reis.jpg
Historic map of Algiers and Bougie by Piri Reis
Date1555
Location
Bougie (in present-day Algeria)
Result Regency of Algiers victory
Territorial
changes
Bougie under Ottoman rule
Belligerents
Flag of the Ottoman Empire (1453-1844).svg Regency of Algiers Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg Spain
Commanders and leaders
Salah Rais Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg Luis Peralta
Flag of Cross of Burgundy.svg Alonso Peralta
Andrea Doria (too late to help)
Strength
6,000 500-1000 men

The Capture of Bougie occurred in 1555 when the Ottoman ruler of Algiers Salah Rais took the city of Béjaïa from the Spaniards. The Spanish presidio was the main fortification in Bougie, occupied by about 100 men under Luis Peralta, and then his son Alonso Peralta. [1] The city was captured by Salah Rais from his base of Algiers, at the head of several thousand men and a small fleet consisting in 2 galleys, a barque, and a French saëte ("flèche", or "arrow") requisitioned in Algiers. [1] Peralta had sent messages to Spain for help, and Andrea Doria prepared to leave with a fleet from Naples, but it was too late. [1]

Algiers City in Algiers Province, Algeria

Algiers is the capital and largest city of Algeria. In 2011, the city's population was estimated to be around 3,500,000. An estimate puts the population of the larger metropolitan city to be around 5,000,000. Algiers is located on the Mediterranean Sea and in the north-central portion of Algeria.

Salah Rais was an Ottoman privateer and admiral. He is alternatively referred to as Sala Reis, Salih Rais, Salek Rais and Cale Arraez in several European sources, particularly in Spain, France and Italy.

Béjaïa City in Béjaïa Province, Algeria

Béjaïa, formerly Bougie and Bugia, is a Mediterranean port city on the Gulf of Béjaïa in Algeria; it is the capital of Béjaïa Province, Kabylia. Béjaïa is the largest principally Kabyle-speaking city in the Kabylie region of Algeria. The history of Béjaïa explains the diversity of the local population.

The Spanish force was defeated, but Alonso Peralta was allowed to leave unharmed with 40 men of his choice. He was severely criticized upon his return to Spain, and was beheaded in Valladolid on 4 May 1556. [1]

Valladolid Municipality in Castile and León, Spain

Valladolid is a city in Spain and the de facto capital of the autonomous community of Castile and León. It has a population of 309,714 people, making it Spain's 13th most populous municipality and northwestern Spain's biggest city. Its metropolitan area ranks 20th in Spain with a population of 414,244 people in 23 municipalities.

The capture of Bougie permitted the Ottomans to encircle the Spanish position at Goletta and that of their ally Ahmad Sultan in Tunis, as they now had strong bases in Béjaïa and Tripoli. [2]

Tunis City in Tunisia

Tunis is the capital and the largest city of Tunisia. The greater metropolitan area of Tunis, often referred to as Grand Tunis, has some 2,700,000 inhabitants.

Tripoli City in Greater Tripoli, Libya

Tripoli is the capital city and the largest city of Libya, with a population of about 1.158 million people in 2018. It is located in the northwest of Libya on the edge of the desert, on a point of rocky land projecting into the Mediterranean Sea and forming a bay. It includes the port of Tripoli and the country's largest commercial and manufacturing centre. It is also the site of the University of Tripoli. The vast Bab al-Azizia barracks, which includes the former family estate of Muammar Gaddafi, is also located in the city. Colonel Gaddafi largely ruled the country, from his residence in this barracks.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean world in the age of Philip II Fernand Braudel p.933-
  2. The Last Great Muslim Empires H. J. Kissling,Bertold Spuler,F. R. C. Bagley p.128

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