Carl Snavely

Last updated
Carl Snavely
Carl Snavely (1951).png
Snavely from 1951 Yackety Yack, North Carolina yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1894-07-30)July 30, 1894
Omaha, Nebraska
DiedJuly 12, 1975(1975-07-12) (aged 80)
St. Louis, Missouri
Playing career
Football
1911–1914 Lebanon Valley
Baseball
c. 1914 Lebanon Valley
1914 York White Roses / Lancaster Red Roses
1915 Chambersburg Maroons
Position(s) First baseman (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1921 Marietta (backfield)
1922–1926 Bellefonte Academy (PA)
1927–1933 Bucknell
1934–1935 North Carolina
1936–1944 Cornell
1945–1952 North Carolina
1953–1958 Washington University
Basketball
1921–1922 Marietta
Baseball
1922 Marietta
1928–1934 Bucknell
Head coaching record
Overall180–96–16 (college football)
4–14 (college basketball)
34–61 (college baseball)
40–2–3 (high school football)
Bowls0–3
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 National (1939)
2 SoCon (1946, 1949)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1965 (profile)

Carl Gray "The Grey Fox" Snavely (July 30, 1894 – July 12, 1975) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Bucknell University (1927–1933), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1934–1935, 1945–1952), Cornell University (1936–1944), and Washington University in St. Louis (1953–1958), compiling a career college football record of 180–96–16. Snavely was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1965.

Contents

Snavley was the head football coach at Bellefonte Academy in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania from 1922 to 1926, tallying a mark of 40–2–3 in five seasons. [1] From 1927 to 1933, Snavely served as the head football coach at Bucknell, where he compiled a 42–16–8 record. From 1934 to 1935, and from 1945 to 1952, he served as the head football coach at North Carolina, where he compiled a 59–35–5 record. He was a proponent of the single wing offense. From 1936 to 1944, he served as the head football coach at Cornell, where he compiled a 46–26–3 record. He was a 1915 graduate of Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pennsylvania, where he played four years on the football team. He was a 1976 inductee into their athletic Hall of Fame.

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsAP#
Bucknell (Independent)(1927–1933)
1927 Bucknell 6–3–1
1928 Bucknell 5–2–3
1929 Bucknell 8–2
1930 Bucknell 6–3
1931 Bucknell 6–0–3
1932 Bucknell 4–4–1
1933 Bucknell 7–2
Bucknell:42–16–8
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Conference)(1934–1935)
1934 North Carolina 7–1–12–0–12nd
1935 North Carolina 8–14–12nd
Cornell Big Red (Independent)(1936–1944)
1936 Cornell 3–5
1937 Cornell 5–2–1
1938 Cornell 5–1–112
1939 Cornell 8–04
1940 Cornell 6–215
1941 Cornell 5–3
1942 Cornell 3–5–1
1943 Cornell 6–4
1944 Cornell5–4
Cornell:46–26–3
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Conference)(1945–1952)
1945 North Carolina 5–52–27th
1946 North Carolina 8–2–14–0–11stL Sugar 9
1947 North Carolina 8–24–12nd9
1948 North Carolina 9–1–14–0–12ndL Sugar 3
1949 North Carolina 7–45–01stL Cotton 16
1950 North Carolina 3–5–23–2–12nd
1951 North Carolina 2–82–3T–10th
1952 North Carolina 2–61–2T–9th
North Carolina:59–35–525–21–4
Washington University Bears (NCAA College Division independent)(1953–1958)
1953 Washington University7–2
1954 Washington University6–3
1955 Washington University5–4
1956 Washington University6–3
1957 Washington University5–3
1958 Washington University4–4
Washington University:33–19
Total:180–96–16
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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The 1927 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1927 college football season. In its first season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 6–3–1 record.

The 1928 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1928 college football season. In its second season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 5–2–3 record.

The 1929 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1929 college football season. In its third season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled an 8–2 record.

The 1930 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1930 college football season. In its fourth season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 6–3 record.

The 1931 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1931 college football season. In its fifth season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 6–0–3 record.

The 1932 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1932 college football season. In its sixth season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 4–4–1 record.

The 1933 Bucknell Bison football team was an American football team that represented Bucknell University as an independent during the 1933 college football season. In its seventh season under head coach Carl Snavely, the team compiled a 7–2 record.

References

  1. "Carl Snavely, New Bucknell Coach". Pittston Gazette. Pittston, Pennsylvania. December 6, 1926. p. 6. Retrieved November 5, 2018 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .