Carmel River State Beach

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Carmel River State Beach
Carmel river state beach open seven am to ten pm.JPG
Carmel River State Beach
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Location Monterey County, California, United States
Nearest city Carmel, California
Coordinates 36°31′56″N121°55′37″W / 36.53222°N 121.92694°W / 36.53222; -121.92694 Coordinates: 36°31′56″N121°55′37″W / 36.53222°N 121.92694°W / 36.53222; -121.92694
Area297 acres (120 ha)
Established1953
Governing body California Department of Parks and Recreation

Carmel River State Beach is a state park unit in Carmel, California, United States, featuring a 1-mile-long (1.6 km) protected beach with a lagoon formed by the Carmel River. The lagoon attracts many migratory birds. The state beach includes Monastery Beach, (also called San Jose Creek Beach) which is popular with scuba divers. Sea kayakers also frequent the beach, which has easy access to the natural reserves of Point Lobos. The 297-acre (120 ha) park was established in 1953. [1]

Contents

History

In 1602 Spanish explorer Sebastián Vizcaíno landed at this beach. [2] Gaspar de Portolà, during the Portola expedition, was encamped on this beach and rested here before deciding to return to San Diego because of low supplies and having failed to rendezvous with the Spanish supply ships. A cross commemorating the landing is on the beach. [3]

Recreational activities

Carmel River State Beach is a popular spot for divers and kayakers, who can access the notable kelp forests in the area. It is also popular with birders, and is a stop on the Central Coast Birding Trail. The best seasons for birdwatching at Carmel River State Beach are fall and winter. [3]

Swimming on this section of the coast can be extremely dangerous because of the strong currents. Carmel River State Beach is considered especially dangerous for swimming as the steep drop-off from shore can minimize turbulent waves giving the mistaken impression of a calm sea.

Location

The park is located adjacent to California State Route 1, about 1 mi (1.6 km) south of Rio Road at the mouth of Carmel Valley, north of the Big Sur coast in Monterey County, California.

See also

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References

  1. "California State Park System Statistical Report: Fiscal Year 2009/10" (PDF). California State Parks: 24. Retrieved 2011-11-12.Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  2. Parr, Barry (2007). Explore! Big Sur Country. Globe Pequot.
  3. 1 2 "Carmel River State Beach". Monterey County Convention & Visitors Bureau. Retrieved 2011-11-12.