Caroline Pafford Miller

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Baxley, Appling County, Georgia Caroline Pafford Miller historical marker.jpg
Baxley, Appling County, Georgia

Caroline Pafford Miller (August 26, 1903 – July 12, 1992) was an American writer.

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She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1934 for her first novel, Lamb in His Bosom , about her home state of Georgia.

Pulitzer Prize U.S. award for achievements in newspaper and online journalism, literature, and musical composition

The Pulitzer Prize is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University in New York City. Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a US$15,000 cash award. The winner in the public service category of the journalism competition is awarded a gold medal.

<i>Lamb in His Bosom</i>

Lamb in His Bosom is a 1933 novel by Caroline Miller. It won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1934. It also won the Prix Femina in 1934 and became an immediate best-seller. Many names and historical parts of this book were contributed by William Avery McIntosh, of Mt. Pleasant, Wayne County, Georgia. His only child, a daughter, is still living in Northeast Georgia.

Georgia (U.S. state) State of the United States of America

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last and southernmost of the original Thirteen Colonies to be established. Named after King George II of Great Britain, the Province of Georgia covered the area from South Carolina south to Spanish Florida and west to French Louisiana at the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788. In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi Territory, which later split to form Alabama with part of former West Florida in 1819. Georgia declared its secession from the Union on January 19, 1861, and was one of the original seven Confederate states. It was the last state to be restored to the Union, on July 15, 1870. Georgia is the 24th largest and the 8th most populous of the 50 United States. From 2007 to 2008, 14 of Georgia's counties ranked among the nation's 100 fastest-growing, second only to Texas. Georgia is known as the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. Atlanta, the state's capital and most populous city, has been named a global city. Atlanta's metropolitan area contains about 55% of the population of the entire state.

Miller born and raised in Waycross, Georgia, and moved to Baxley in the late 1920s. She never attended college. After graduating from high school she married William D. Miller, who was her English professor, and who ultimately became superintendent of schools in the Baxley area. The couple had three sons, two of whom were twins.

Waycross, Georgia City in Georgia, United States

Waycross is the county seat of, and only incorporated city in, Ware County. in the U.S. state of Georgia. The population was 14,725 at the 2010 Census.

Miller gathered much of the material for Lamb in his Bosom while she was buying chickens and eggs ten miles in the backwoods. She said of her novel, "Almost every incident in Lamb in His Bosom actually occurred. Some of them I heard from my uncles and aunts, some from my mother. I got most of the local color from hereabouts, but the facts from family history and history of other families. I could hardly tell where fact left off and fancy began."

She died in Waynesville, North Carolina.

Works

See also

Library of Congress (de facto) national library of the United States of America

The Library of Congress (LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center in Culpeper, Virginia. The Library's functions are overseen by the Librarian of Congress, and its buildings are maintained by the Architect of the Capitol. The Library of Congress has claims to be the largest library in the world. Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages."

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