Carrán-Los Venados

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Carrán-Los Venados

Cerro-carran.jpg

Cerro Los Guindos (center) as seen from south; Mocho-Choshuenco volcano in left background
Highest point
Elevation 1,114 m (3,655 ft)
Coordinates 40°18′29″S72°04′12″W / 40.308°S 72.07°W / -40.308; -72.07 (highest point)
Geography
Location Chile
Geology
Mountain type Pyroclastic cones, maars
Volcanic arc/belt Southern Volcanic Zone
Last eruption April to May 1979

Carrán-Los Venados (Spanish pronunciation:  [kaˈran los βeˈnaðos] ) is a volcanic group of scoria cones, maars and small stratovolcanoes in southern Chile, southeast of Ranco Lake. The highest cone is Los Guindos (Spanish for "The Cherry Trees), which is a small stratovolcano with an elevation of 1,114 metres (3,655 ft). The volcanic group has recorded eruptions from 1955 and 1979. Located south of Maihue Lake and north Puyehue Volcano Carrán-Los Venados group is placed at the intersection of several faults on the thin crust (~30 km) of southern Chile, among them Liquiñe-Ofqui and Futrono Fault.

A volcanic group is a collection of related volcanoes or volcanic landforms. The term is also used in a different sense when it denotes a suite of associated rock strata largely of volcanic origin; see group (stratigraphy) for details.

Stratovolcano Tall, conical volcano built up by many layers of hardened lava and other ejecta

A stratovolcano, also known as a composite volcano, is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava, tephra, pumice and ash. Unlike shield volcanoes, stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile with a summit crater and periodic intervals of explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions, although some have collapsed summit craters called calderas. The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far, due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic, having high-to-intermediate levels of silica, with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi).

Southern Chile is an informal geographic term for any place south of the capital city, Santiago, or south of Biobío River, the mouth of which is Concepción, about 300 kilometres (200 mi) south of Santiago. Generally cities like Temuco are considered to be located in the south despite being relatively close to the geographical center of Chile. This is mainly because mainland Chile ended in La Frontera until the occupation of Araucanía (1860s-1880s). Similarly, the Southern Chile wine region is close to the geographic center of the country, encompassing wine-growing areas in the Bío Bío Region and Araucanía Region.

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Volcanoes

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Maar Low-relief volcanic crater

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Mocho-Choshuenco

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The Volcano (British Columbia) mountain in Canada

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Nilahue River river in Chile

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Calabozos mountain in Chile

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References

Global Volcanism Program American research program

The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) documents Earth's volcanoes and their eruptive history over the past 10,000 years. The GVP reports on current eruptions from around the world as well as maintaining a database repository on active volcanoes and their eruptions. In this way, a global context for the planet's active volcanism is presented. Smithsonian reporting on current volcanic activity dates back to 1968, with the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena (CSLP). The GVP is housed in the Department of Mineral Sciences, part of the National Museum of Natural History, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Smithsonian Institution group of museums and research centers administered by the United States government

The Smithsonian Institution, founded on August 10, 1846 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge," is a group of museums and research centers administered by the Government of the United States. The institution is named after its founding donor, British scientist James Smithson. Originally organized as the "United States National Museum," that name ceased to exist as an administrative entity in 1967.

Müller, G. and Veyl, G., 1957. The birth of Nilahue, a new maar type volcano at Rininahue, Chile, 20th International Geological Congress, Mexico, pp. 375–396.