Carry Lab

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Carry Lab(キャリーラボ,Kyarī Rabo) is a defunct Japanese software house. Thanks to the efforts of entrepreneur and computer engineer Yoichiro Hirano, the company evolved from the "MyCon Club" into a real business in 1981. As Carry Lab, the company developed popular word processing software and computer and video games. They also ported popular Taito titles such as Chack'n Pop to Japanese computers. One of their games, Hao-kun no Fushigi na Tabi , did make it to North American shores as Mystery Quest for the Nintendo Entertainment System. The game, published by Taxan, was cut and reduced in difficulty.

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Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

A software house is a company whose primary products are various forms of software, software technology, distribution, and software product development. Software houses are companies in the software industry.

<i>Chackn Pop</i> 1983 video game

Chack'n Pop is an arcade game released by Taito in 1983, it is considered to be the spiritual predecessor of Bubble Bobble due to the shared characters and similar game structure. The arcade rom set also contains unused graphics for the mechanical wind-up "Zen-Chan" that later appeared in Bubble Bobble. Although now considered obscure, home conversions of the game exist for Sega SG-1000, MSX, Famicom, NEC PC-6001 and NEC PC-8801, and the arcade emulation is included in Taito Legends Power-Up for the PSP and Taito Legends 2 for the Xbox, PlayStation 2, and PC.

Carry Lab's funding system was not set up well, and the programmers didn't see eye to eye with the sales managers, so the company's core team left in 1986. Afterwards, Carry Lab joined the Disk Original Group, a collective publishing house for Famicom Disk System games set up by Square Co. Carry Lab survived for a few years afterwards re-releasing their old games.

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