Carryduff

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Carryduff
  • Irish: Ceathrú Aodha Dhuibh
Killynure Road, Carryduff - geograph.org.uk - 1618119.jpg
County Down UK location map.svg
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Location within County Down
Population6,961 (2011 Census)
District
County
Country Northern Ireland
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Historic county
Post town BELFAST
Postcode district BT8
Dialling code 028
Police Northern Ireland
Fire Northern Ireland
Ambulance Northern Ireland
UK Parliament
NI Assembly
List of places
UK
Northern Ireland
Down
54°30′32″N5°52′19″W / 54.509°N 5.872°W / 54.509; -5.872 Coordinates: 54°30′32″N5°52′19″W / 54.509°N 5.872°W / 54.509; -5.872
Carryduff Library Carryduff Library.jpg
Carryduff Library

Carryduff (from Irish : Ceathrú Aodha Dhuibh, meaning 'Black Hugh's quarter') [1] [2] [3] is a small town and townland in County Down, Northern Ireland, about 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) south of Belfast city centre. It had a population of 6,961 people in the 2011 Census. [4]

Contents

Most of the settlement lies within the townland of Carryduff, although part of it extends into the neighbouring townlands of Killynure and Mealough.

History

One of the earliest references to the settlement dates from 1622, where its anglicised name is written as Carrow-Hugh-Duffe. [3] The original village formed where six roads and a river crossed, and is the site of the ancient Queen's Fort Rath. The road south from Belfast (the A24) climbs out of a gap in the Castlereagh Hills, and splits at Carryduff, one fork (the A7) continuing to Downpatrick (via Saintfield and Crossgar), the other fork (A24) continuing via Ballynahinch to Newcastle towards Kilkeel. In addition, the road from the Ards Peninsula, Newtownards and Comber (the B178) crosses here en route to Hillsborough in the west. All six roads cross the small Carryduff River here (which flows northwards to eventually join the River Lagan at Minnowburn).

The Knockbracken Reservoir was constructed for the Belfast Water Commissioners and opened in 1901, the same year as the Mourne Conduit which carried water from the Kilkeel and Annalong rivers (and later the Silent Valley Reservoir) to Carryduff where it was transported on to Belfast. [5] The Mourne Conduit was replaced by the Aquarius pipeline and associated infrastructure between 1999 and 2004. [6] This new pipeline was laid to the east and north of Carryduff, crossing the A24 at Brackenvale, and bypassing the Knockbracken Reservoir.

The good road connections and proximity to Belfast made the town an ideal site for overspill development from the city in the 1960s. This period saw numerous housing developments, the construction of the Town and Country Shopping Centre, and Carryduff Primary School, leading into the 1970s with the building of the Killynure housing estate by the Northern Ireland Housing Executive. Development along one side of the northbound A24 took place adjacent to the Immaculate Heart of Mary Roman Catholic Church and St Joseph's Primary School, with the Knockbracken Reservoir on the other side.

The 1980s saw expansion continue with Carryduff becoming a commuter town for Belfast workers. Developments continued into the 1990s and included Carryduff Library, Carryduff Shopping Centre, including shops such as Wellworths (later SuperValu) and stationery and book shop NPO (later Eason). Numerous further housing developments have been built, as well as the Lough Moss Leisure Centre. These developments saw the Carryduff River placed inside a culvert for much of its journey through the town.

Very little green belt land now remains between Carryduff and the southern border of Belfast, the 1980s having seen the former Matthew Stop Line breached.

The local Carryduff Gaelic Athletic Club is based at Pairc Aodha Dhuibh. Carryduff also has 2 local men's football teams who all play from Lough Moss pitches in the town, they are Carryduff Carryduff Colts F.C. and Carryduff Athletic F.C.

In 2018, the disused Knockbracken reservoir has become Ireland's largest aqua park, offering a range of water based activities. [7]

Demography

The population of Carryduff on Census day (27 March 2011) was 6,961 people. [4] Of these:

See also

Related Research Articles

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Newry Human settlement in Northern Ireland

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Kilkeel Human settlement in Northern Ireland

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Mourne Mountains Mountain range in Northern Ireland

The Mourne Mountains, also called the Mournes or Mountains of Mourne, are a granite mountain range in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland. They include the highest mountains in Northern Ireland, the highest of which is Slieve Donard at 850 m (2,790 ft). The Mournes are designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and it has been proposed to make the area Northern Ireland's first national park. The area is partly owned by the National Trust and sees many visitors every year. The Mourne Wall crosses fifteen of the summits and was built to enclose the catchment basin of the Silent Valley and Ben Crom reservoirs.

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Annalong Human settlement in Northern Ireland

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Silent Valley Reservoir

The Silent Valley Reservoir is a reservoir located in the Mourne Mountains near Kilkeel, County Down in Northern Ireland. It supplies most of the water for County Down, surrounding counties and most of Belfast. It is owned and maintained by Northern Ireland Water Limited. The reservoir was built between 1923 and 1933 by a workforce of over 1,000 men, nine of whom died during construction.

Clough

Clough is a village and townland in County Down, Northern Ireland. It sits about 3 miles from Dundrum on the A2 between Newcastle and Belfast. The A2 continues via Downpatrick and the coast via Strangford and the Portaferry - Strangford Ferry to Portaferry to Belfast, whilst most road traffic heads along from Clough along the A24 via Carryduff to Belfast. It had a population of 255 people in the 2001 Census. Clough is situated within the Newry, Mourne and Down area.

Drumaness Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Drumaness is a village and townland in the Newry, Mourne and Down District Council area of County Down, Northern Ireland. It is 3 miles or 5 kilometres south of Ballynahinch, beside the main A24 Belfast to Newcastle road. It is situated in the civil parish of Magheradroll and the historic barony of Kinelarty. In the 2011 Census it had a population of 1,339 people.

Drumbo Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Drumbo is a small village, townland and civil parish in County Down, Northern Ireland. It is about 6 miles (10 km) south of Belfast city centre, 3 miles (5 km) east of Lisburn and 3 miles (5 km) west of Carryduff. It is in the historic barony of Castlereagh Upper.

The Carryduff River is a minor river in County Down, Northern Ireland. It is a direct tributary of the River Lagan and is not navigable.

Atticall Human settlement in Northern Ireland

Attical or Atticall is a small village and townland in the Mourne Mountains of County Down, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the civil parish of Kilkeel and the historic barony of Mourne. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 153 people. It lies within the Newry and Mourne District Council area.

Ballymartin is one of several places on the island of Ireland.

Dunnaval is a small village and townland near Kilkeel in County Down, Northern Ireland. It is situated in the civil parish of Kilkeel and the historic barony of Mourne. In the 2001 Census it had a population of 147 people. It lies within the Newry and Mourne District Council area.

Mourne was a constituency of the Parliament of Northern Ireland.

Luke Livingston Macassey

Luke Livingstone Macassey was an Irish civil engineer and barrister, notable for his contributions to public health by improving the water supply in the north of Ireland. In 1874 he was appointed consultant hydraulic engineer by the Belfast Water Commissioners in which capacity he was instrumental in finding new sources of water for the expanding city of Belfast. He proposed use of a 9,000-acre catchment area in the Mourne Mountains and a three stage project:

  1. The first stage was to divert water from the Kilkeel and Annalong rivers through the newly constructed Mourne Conduit to a reservoir at Carryduff. These water pipes were capable of supplying 10 million imperial gallons of water per day. Work was completed in 1901.
  2. The second stage was to build a storage reservoir, the Silent Valley Reservoir, across the Kilkeel River. Design work on this phase began in 1910, but procurement of the work was delayed by World War I. A contract was eventually awarded in 1923 to S. Pearson & Son and work continued until 1933.
  3. The third stage was planned to be another storage reservoir in Annalong to impound the Annalong River. However, after the difficulties encountered in building the Silent Valley dam this second dam was not built.
Ben Crom Reservoir

Ben Crom Reservoir is a reservoir located in the Mourne Mountains near Kilkeel, County Down, Northern Ireland. Along with Silent Valley Reservoir, which is situated further down the Kilkeel River valley, it supplies water for County Down, surrounding counties and most of Belfast. It was constructed between 1953 and 1957, as the final part of the Mourne scheme to provide water to Belfast which started with the passing of the Belfast Water Act in 1893.

Belfast City and District Water Commissioners

The Belfast Water Commissioners was a public body in Ireland and later Northern Ireland, established by the Belfast Water Act 1840, to improve the supply of water to the expanding city of Belfast. By 1852, the city was suffering a shortfall in supply of almost one million gallons per day. In 1889 the body's name was changed to Belfast City and District Water Commissioners in recognition of the expanding boundaries of Belfast and resulting increased demand for water.

Baron Kilkeel

Baron Kilkeel is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 19 May 2018 by Queen Elizabeth II as a subsidiary title for her grandson Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, upon the occasion of his marriage to Meghan Markle. It is named after the small fishing port of Kilkeel, County Down, with a population of 6,887, in the District of Newry, Mourne and Down in Northern Ireland. On the same day, he was also created Duke of Sussex and Earl of Dumbarton. Traditionally, male members of the royal family are granted at least one title on their wedding day by the monarch.

The Mourne Conduit was a water main which ran 42 kilometres (26 mi) from the Silent Valley Reservoir to Carryduff, near Belfast and was built between 1893 and 1901 for the Belfast City and District Water Commissioners. This was supplemented by additional pipelines twice in the 20th Century. This system supplied water to Greater Belfast and North Down for more than 100 years. It is labelled as the Mourne Aqueduct in Ordnance Survey maps from the early 20th century.

References

  1. Placenames Database of Ireland
  2. "Ainm: Journal of the Ulster Placename Society - County Down". Archived from the original on 14 December 2010. Retrieved 17 February 2010.
  3. 1 2 Northern Ireland Placenames Project Archived 17 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  4. 1 2 "Census 2011 Population Statistics for Carryduff Settlement". Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA). Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  5. "Your Place And Mine - Down - A Century of Water from the Mournes - a concise history". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 16 May 2021.
  6. "Your Place And Mine - Down - A Century of Water from the Mournes - Part 6". www.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 16 May 2021.
  7. "Let's Go Hydro". visitbelfast.com. Retrieved 4 September 2018.