Casey, Australian Capital Territory

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Casey
Canberra,  Australian Capital Territory
Plimsoll Drive, Casey, Canberra.JPG
Australia Capital Territory location map.svg
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Casey
Coordinates 35°10′29″S149°05′45″E / 35.1747°S 149.0959°E / -35.1747; 149.0959 Coordinates: 35°10′29″S149°05′45″E / 35.1747°S 149.0959°E / -35.1747; 149.0959
Population6,471 (SAL 2021) [1]
Established1991
Postcode(s) 2913
Area2.6 km2 (1.0 sq mi)
District Gungahlin
Territory electorate(s) Yerrabi
Federal division(s) Fenner
Suburbs around Casey:
Kinlyside Casey Ngunnawal
Nicholls Nicholls Nicholls

Casey is a suburb in Canberra, Australia, approximately 4 km from the Gungahlin Town Centre and about 13 km from the centre of Canberra. The suburb is named after Richard Casey, Baron Casey an Australian politician, diplomat and later the 16th Governor-General of Australia. It is bound by Horse Park Drive [2] and Clarrie Hermes Drive. Casey is located in north-west Gungahlin, adjacent to the suburbs of Nicholls and Ngunnawal, and the future suburbs of Kinlyside, Taylor and Moncrieff.

Contents

The suburb draws its place names from notable Australian diplomats, public servants and administrators. Former Lieutenant-Governor of South Australia Walter Crocker and Sir John Overall, the former head of the National Capital Development Commission are honoured by place names in Casey. [3]

History

Until 1990, Casey was part of the former 'Gold Creek' a 3,940-acre (15.9 km2) rural property with the Gold Creek Homestead at its centre. The relative flat and even topography of portions of the suburb of Casey was ideal for various pursuits including horse racing, and was the site of a practice track for racing horses. [4] A stand of trees parallel to Horse Park Drive which predates the establishment of the village (now the suburb) of Hall marks the original alignment of the Queanbeyan-Yass Road.

Development

Stage 1 for Casey in December 2009 Casey roundabout.JPG
Stage 1 for Casey in December 2009

Construction work on road and other infrastructure for Casey commenced in September 2008. In December 2009, Overall Avenue, the connector road for Casey Stage 1, opened to traffic between Clarrie Hermes Drive and Horsepark Drive. During this period stormwater infrastructure including a sediment pond was also completed (pictured below right). Settlement of the suburb began in 2010 and it had an estimated population of 2,881 on 30 June 2013. [5]

Casey will eventually occupy an area approximately 192 ha in size and accommodate 1,940 dwellings, including about 275 medium density units in the commercial centres. A Group (Shopping) Centre will be constructed in the south-east corner of the suburb near the corner of Horse Park and Clarrie Hermes Drives. A second and minor commercial centre planned for Casey will be built at the northern end of the suburb nearest the future suburb of Taylor. The Group Centre is expected to incorporate a retail core clustered around a 'central green-node' similar to Green Square in Kingston. [6] To improve accessibility of the Group Centre, Clarrie Hermes Drive has been extended through to the Barton Highway at its westerly end.

Geology

Casey Pond in December 2009 CaseyPond.jpg
Casey Pond in December 2009

The landscape slopes to the south east, with a line of hills forming a ridge on the north west side making a backdrop. The low point is 622 metres at the roundabout joining Gungahlin Drive, Horse Park Drive and Clarrie Hermes drive. The highest point is 726 metres in the north west corner.

Casey is underlaid by rocks from the Silurian period. Along the hill tops the rock is from the Hawkins Volcanics, with mostly dacite in the south, and andesite in the north. The north east of the suburb has dacite from the Canberra Formation. The south east has a green grey porphyry with a dacite like composition, and visible white feldspar crystals. [7]

Related Research Articles

Gungahlin Place in Australian Capital Territory

The District of Gungahlin is one of the original eighteen districts of the Australian Capital Territory used in land administration. The Gungahlin Region is one of fastest growing regions within Australia. The district is subdivided into divisions (suburbs), sections and blocks. Gungahlin is an Aboriginal word meaning either "white man's house" or "little rocky hill".

Kinlyside is a rural locality in the Australian Capital Territory. It was gazetted in 1991 as a planned outer suburb of Gungahlin. It was never released for development, and the governing Labor Party campaigned at the 2004 election and 2008 election on the policy of making Kinlyside a nature reserve instead. In 2013, it was set aside as a protected area that would remain undeveloped under an environmental offsets plan associated with increased development in Gungahlin. As of 2019, it remains a gazetted locality in the Territory Plan.

Taylor is a suburb in Gungahlin, Canberra, Australia. Development of the suburb began in 2017. It is named after magazine publisher Florence Mary Taylor, who was editor of and writer for several Australian building industry journals including the influential Building magazine. The suburb is approximately 4 km from the Gungahlin Town Centre and 16 km from the centre of Canberra and bounded to the south by Horse Park Drive. One Tree Hill lies to the northwest on the border with New South Wales. The suburb is located in north Gungahlin adjacent to the suburbs of Moncrieff, Casey, Jacka and Ngunnawal.

Jacka, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

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Amaroo, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

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Gungahlin, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Gungahlin is a suburb in the Canberra, Australia district with the same name; Gungahlin. The postcode is 2912. Gungahlin is the name for the entire district, and also the town centre, but it is also the name of the suburb which Gungahlin Town Centre is in.

Harrison, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Harrison is a suburb of the district of Gungahlin in Canberra, Australia. The suburb is named after the former city planner Peter Harrison, who was instrumental in reviving Walter Burley Griffin's plan for the National Capital. The suburb is adjacent to the suburbs of Franklin, Gungahlin, Throsby, Kenny and the industrial estate Mitchell. Harrison's place names reflects those of "natural features, waterfalls, plains, tablelands and plateaux". The suburb is located approximately 2 km east of the Gungahlin Town Centre and about 10 km from the centre of Canberra.

Ngunnawal, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Ngunnawal is a suburb in the district of Gungahlin in Canberra, Australia. The suburb is named in tribute to the Ngunnawal people, the original inhabitants of the area. The suburb was gazetted on 24 April 1992. Ngunnawal is adjacent to the suburbs of Nicholls, Casey, Moncrieff, Amaroo and Gungahlin. It is bounded by Gungahlin Drive, Horse Park Drive, Gundaroo Drive and Mirrabei Drive. Ginninderra Creek is situated near Ngunnawal's eastern boundary. The suburb is located approximately 4 km from the Gungahlin Town Centre and about 13 km from the centre of Canberra.

Nicholls, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Nicholls is a suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. It was named after Sir Douglas Nicholls (1906–1988) who was born at Cummeragunja Aboriginal mission, New South Wales. Nicholls was a footballer, pastor, activist, and a former Governor of South Australia. Streets are named after various sportsmen and sportswomen.

Palmerston, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Palmerston is a suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. The postcode is 2913. The suburb is named after George Thomas Palmer (1784–1854) who established a settlement in the Canberra region in 1826 called Palmerville, which was later renamed Ginninderra. It was gazetted on 20 March 1991. Streets are named after mountains and mountain ranges of Australia, with the main street called Kosciuszko Avenue. It is next to the suburbs of Nicholls, Gungahlin, Crace and Franklin. It was the second suburb to be developed in the Gungahlin district, after the industrial suburb of Mitchell. It is bounded by Gungahlin drive and Gundaroo drive.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kambah, Australian Capital Territory</span> Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Kambah is the northernmost suburb in the district of Tuggeranong, Canberra. It is located just south of Mount Taylor in the Canberra Nature Park. It is located north of the suburbs of Greenway and Wanniassa. It is bounded by Sulwood Drive to the north and Athllon Drive to the south-east.

Hall, Australian Capital Territory Town in Australian Capital Territory

Hall is a township situated in the District of Hall, in the north of the Australian Capital Territory, Australia. At the 2016 census, the village had a population of 271 people. It is surrounded by open country and has a rural appearance. Hall has retained a village character. The township features historic buildings that existed before the establishment of Canberra.

Bonner is a suburb in the district of Gungahlin in Canberra in Australia. The suburb is named in memory after Senator Neville Bonner, Australia's first Indigenous parliamentarian who served the people of Queensland during the years 1971–1984. The suburb is bounded by Horse Park Drive, Mulligans Flat Road, and Roden Cutler Drive and is approximately 4 km (2.5 mi) from the Gungahlin Town Centre and 16 km (9.9 mi) from the centre of Canberra. It is adjacent to the suburbs of Jacka, Amaroo and Forde. Settlement of the suburb began in 2010 and it had an estimated population of 6,730 at the 2016 census.

Crace, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Crace is a suburb of Canberra, Australia in the district of Gungahlin. It was named after Edward Kendall Crace an original settler in the Gungahlin area. Streets in Crace are named after parishes and land divisions from colonial times. It is bounded by the Barton Highway, Gundaroo Drive, Nudurr Drive and Gungahlin Drive. Located in the suburb is the Canberra Nature Park of Gungaderra Grasslands nature reserve. At the 2016 census, it had a population of 4,459.

Kenny is a designated suburb in the Canberra, Australia district of Gungahlin. The suburb is named in honour of Elizabeth Kenny, an Australian who pioneered muscle rehabilitation practices which serve as the foundation of physiotherapy. It is adjacent to the suburbs of Watson, Lyneham, the Mitchell industrial estate, Harrison and Throsby and bounded by the Federal Highway to the east and Horse Park Drive to the north. The suburb Kenny is situated about 4 km from the Gungahlin Towncentre and 8 km from the centre of Canberra.

Moncrieff, Australian Capital Territory Suburb of Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

Moncrieff is a suburb in the Gungahlin district of Canberra, the National Capital of Australia. The name was gazetted in April 1991, with initial land releases becoming available to developers in June 2014. It is named after Gladys Moncrieff, an Australian singer of the 1920-1930s musical era who was dubbed 'Australia's Queen of Song'. The suburb is in north Gungahlin, adjacent to the existing suburbs of Ngunnawal and Amaroo and the future suburbs of Taylor and Jacka. The suburb is located approximately 4 km from the Gungahlin Town Centre and 16 km from the centre of Canberra, and is bounded by Mirrabei Drive and Horse Park Drive. It is home to the Moncrieff Community Recreation Park, which was voted the ACT's favourite playground in 2021.

Throsby is a designated suburb of Canberra, Australia in the district of Gungahlin. The suburb is adjacent to the suburbs of Kenny and Harrison and is bounded by the Federal Highway to the east, the ACT/NSW border to the north, Horse Park Drive to the south and the Goorooyarroo nature reserve to the west. The suburb is named after the explorer Charles Throsby who was one of the first Europeans to open up the lands west of the Blue Mountains to grazing and agriculture.

Gold Creek Homestead Building

Gold Creek Homestead is a 140-year-old stone and brick building located off Gungahlin Drive in Ngunnawal a north-western suburb of Canberra, Australia. It is adjacent to the Grove Ngunnawal retirement village currently being developed by Lend Lease.

Gungahlin Drive is an arterial road in Canberra, Australia. Its urban portion is 7.4 km (5 mi) long, and serves as one of the major thoroughfares in the Gungahlin district, before becoming a parkway standard roadway south of the Barton Highway, this high quality section was built as the major part of the Gungahlin Drive Extension project.

Horse Park Drive Road in Canberra, Australia

Horse Park Drive is an arterial road in the Gungahlin district of Canberra, Australia. It is named for the homestead Horse Park, built in 1853 which is located in the suburb of Jacka. The road provides a bypass of the Gungahlin town centre, linking the western suburbs of the district to the Federal Highway to Goulburn and the Majura Parkway, linking to the Monaro Highway and Canberra Airport.

References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (28 June 2022). "Casey (Suburb and Locality)". Australian Census 2021 QuickStats. Retrieved 28 June 2022.  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
  2. Named after the rural property called 'Horse Park' located in the suburb of Jacka
  3. "Suburb Name search results". ACT Environment and Sustainable Development. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  4. Newman Chris (2004), Gold Creek, Reflections of Canberra's Rural Heritage, Gold Creek Homestead Working Group.
  5. "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2012-13". 3 April 2014. Retrieved 6 April 2014.
  6. Purdon Associates Brown Consulting (2007), Casey Concept Plan, ACT Planning and Land Authority
  7. Henderson G A M and Matveev G, Geology of Canberra, Queanbeyan and Environs 1:50000 1980.