Casseneuil

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Casseneuil
Casseneuil - Eglise Saint-Pierre -1.JPG
The church in Casseneuil
Blason ville fr Casseneuil (Lot-et-Garonne).svg
Coat of arms
Location of Casseneuil
Casseneuil
France location map-Regions and departements-2016.svg
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Casseneuil
Aquitaine-Limousin-Poitou-Charentes region location map.svg
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Casseneuil
Coordinates: 44°26′37″N0°37′20″E / 44.4436°N 0.6222°E / 44.4436; 0.6222 Coordinates: 44°26′37″N0°37′20″E / 44.4436°N 0.6222°E / 44.4436; 0.6222
Country France
Region Nouvelle-Aquitaine
Department Lot-et-Garonne
Arrondissement Villeneuve-sur-Lot
Canton Le Livradais
Intercommunality CA du Grand Villeneuvois
Government
  Mayor (20012008) Daniel Desplat
Area
1
18.09 km2 (6.98 sq mi)
Population
 (2017-01-01) [1]
2,386
  Density130/km2 (340/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
47049 /47440
Elevation38–204 m (125–669 ft)
(avg. 52 m or 171 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Casseneuil is a commune in the Lot-et-Garonne department in south-western France.

Contents

Sieges of 1209 and 1214 during the Albigensian Crusade

In July 1214 Robert de Courçon, the papal legate, awarded the territories of Rodez, Albigeois, Quercy and Agenais in perpetuity to Simon IV de Montfort, who promptly set out with an army from Carcassonne to seize his new fief. Capturing the towns and destroying the castles of the existing lords, he burned the few heretics he found. All who opposed this assault, regardless of their religious beliefs, were his enemies. Many fled to the safety of Casseneuil, which had withstood the siege of 1209. However, in late August Casseneuil itself fell and he awarded Dominic de Guzmán and his preachers at Fanjeaux with the rents due from the town, though it is doubtful if they were able to collect them. His army then moved north to attack Périgord, even though it was not part of his papal grant. [2] [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Populations légales 2017". INSEE . Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  2. Taylor, Claire (2011), Heresy, Crusade and Inquisition in Medieval Quercy, Boydell & Brewer Ltd, p. 98, retrieved 24 December 2017
  3. Hinnebusch, William A. (1960), "Poverty in the Order of Preachers", The Catholic Historical Review, 45, p. 439, JSTOR   25016596