Category 4 cable

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Category 4 cable (Cat 4) is a cable that consists of eight copper wires arranged in four unshielded twisted pairs (UTP) supporting signals up to 20  MHz. [1] It is used in telephone networks which can transmit voice and data up to 16  Mbit/s. [2]

For a brief period it was used for some Token Ring, [3] 10BASE-T, and 100BASE-T4 networks, but was quickly superseded by Category 5 cable. It is no longer common or used in new installations and is not recognized by the current version of the ANSI/TIA-568 data cabling standards.

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References

  1. Spurgeon, Charles E (2000). Ethernet: the definitive guide . O'Reilly. p.  212. ISBN   9781565929524.
  2. CCNA: Network Media Types
  3. Local Area Network Concepts and Products: LAN Architecture (PDF), IBM, May 1996, archived from the original (PDF) on 2013-06-23