Catilina's Riddle

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Catilina's Riddle
Catilina's Riddle cover.jpg
First edition
Author Steven Saylor
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Series Roma Sub Rosa
Genre Historical
Publisher St. Martin's Press
Publication date
1993
Media typePrint (hardback & paperback)
Pages430 pp
ISBN 978-0312097639
Preceded by Arms of Nemesis  
Followed by The Venus Throw  

Catilina's Riddle is a historical novel by American author Steven Saylor, first published by St. Martin's Press in 1993. It is the third book in his Roma Sub Rosa series of mystery novels set in the final decades of the Roman Republic. The main character is the Roman sleuth Gordianus the Finder.

Plot summary

The year is 63 BC, and Cicero is consul of Rome. Gordianus, once an associate of Cicero, has moved to the Etruscan countryside, where he has inherited a farm from an old aristocratic friend of his. Unfortunately, he doesn't get on well with his neighbours, who are family of the man who left him the farm. Cicero, however, still needs his help, and asks Gordianus to look out for the notorious Lucius Sergius Catilina, who Cicero is convinced is plotting a conspiracy to take power in Rome. Then one day, Gordianus' daughter Diana finds a headless corpse in their stable, whom Gordianus dubs Nemo.

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