Central Slovenia Statistical Region

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Central Slovenia Statistical Region
Osrednjeslovenska statistična regija
Central Slovenia Statistical Region in Slovenia.svg
Municipalities 26
Largest city Ljubljana
Area
  Total2,555 km2 (986 sq mi)
Population
 (2020)
  Total570,773
  Density220/km2 (580/sq mi)
Statistics
  Households212760
  Employed195075
  Registered unemployed2893
  College/university students21620
  Regional GDP (2019): EUR 18,011 bn
(EUR 32,620 per capita)
HDI (2019)0.952 [1]
very high · 1st

The Central Slovenia Statistical Region [2] [3] [4] [5] (Slovene : Osrednjeslovenska statistična regija) is a statistical region in central Slovenia.

Contents

Geography

This is the second-largest region in terms of territory. It has a total area of 2,555 km², with a central position and good traffic connections in all directions, and the country's capital is located in it.

Population

The area is the most densely populated statistical region in Slovenia, with the largest number of inhabitants. The population in 2020 was 570,773. It had the highest proportion of people between ages 25 and 64 with a post-secondary education.

Cities and towns

The Central Slovenia Statistical Region includes 9 cities and towns, the largest of which is Ljubljana.

Rank
Name
Population (2021) [6]
1.
Blason ville si Ljubljana (Slovenie).svg Ljubljana
285,604
2.
Grb Kamnika.svg Kamnik
13,902
3.
Domzale.png Domžale
13,102
4.
Logatec.grb.png Logatec
9,947
5.
Vrhnika.png Vrhnika
8,889
6.
Coat of arms of Grosuplje.png Grosuplje
7,607
7.
Coat of arms of Menges.png Mengeš
7,010
8.
Medvode.png Medvode
5,330
9.
Coat of arms of Visnja Gora.svg Višnja Gora
1,135

Municipalities

The Central Slovenia Statistical Region comprises the following 25 municipalities:

The Municipality of Litija was part of the region until January 2015; it became part of the Central Sava Statistical Region in 2015. [7]

Economy

As the economically most developed region, in 2012 it generated 27 times more gross domestic product than the Central Sava Statistical Region, or more than a third of the national GDP. In 2012 the region recorded 98 new companies per 10,000 population (the highest number of new companies was recorded in the Coastal–Karst Statistical Region; namely, 113 per 10,000 population). At the same time, this region had one of the highest five-year survival rates of new companies (55%). According to the labour migration index (126.0), this region was very labour oriented. That region's importance for employment is also confirmed by the fact that the number of jobs in the region is much larger than the number of employed persons living in it. Earnings of persons employed in this region are the highest in the country: in 2013 the average net earnings in the country amounted to EUR 997, whereas in this region they were over EUR 90 higher.

Employment structure: 69.7% services, 28.1% industry, 2.2% agriculture.

Tourism

It attracts 13.2% of the total number of tourists in Slovenia, most being visitors from abroad who visit Ljubljana (90.7%).

Transportation

Sources

  1. "Sub-national HDI - Area Database - Global Data Lab". hdi.globaldatalab.org. Retrieved 2021-07-20.
  2. OECD. 2012. OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Slovenia 2012. OECD Publishing, p. 27.
  3. Gortnar, Anica. 2014. Povezanost prometnih nesreč z različnimi vremenskimi razmerami (bachelor's thesis). Ljubljana: University of Ljubljana, Department of Geography, p. 59.
  4. Lapuh, Lucija. 2016. Measuring the Impact of the Recession on Slovenian Statistical Regions and their Ability to Recover. Acta geographica Slovenica 56(2): 247–256, pp. 252ff.
  5. Boršič, Darja, & Alenka Kavkler. 2009. Modeling Unemployment Duration in Slovenia Using Cox Regression Models. Transition Studies Review 54(1): 145–156, p. 148.
  6. "Prebivalstvo po spolu in po starosti, naselja, Slovenija, letno".
  7. Regije v številkah: Statistični portret slovenskih regij 2017 (PDF). Ljubljana: Statistični urad Republike Slovenije. 2017. p. 46.

Coordinates: 46°03′00″N14°31′00″E / 46.05000°N 14.51667°E / 46.05000; 14.51667

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