Chadwick Pictures

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Chadwick Pictures ad in The Film Daily, 1926 Chadwick Pictures ad in The Film Daily, Jan-Jun 1926 (page 908 crop).jpg
Chadwick Pictures ad in The Film Daily, 1926

Chadwick Pictures was an American film production and distribution company active during the silent and early sound eras. It was originally established in New York by Isaac E. Chadwick in 1920 to release films, but from 1924 also began to produce them. [1] In later years the company's independent films were similar to those of other small studios on Poverty Row. Following the introduction of sound, its releases were handled by Monogram Pictures. In 1933 it ceased production entirely.

Contents

Filmography

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References

  1. Swartz p.198

Bibliography