Chamber of Deputies (Brazil)

Last updated
Chamber of Deputies

Câmara dos Deputados
56th Legislature of the National Congress
Camara dos Deputados.png
Type
Type
Term limits
None
History
FoundedMay 6, 1826 (1826-05-06)
New session started
February 1, 2019 (2019-02-01)
Leadership
Rodrigo Maia, DEM
since July 14, 2016
Government Leader
Major Vitor Hugo, PSL
Majority Leader
Aguinaldo Ribeiro, PP
Opposition Leader
Alessandro Molon, PSB
Minority Leader
Jandira Feghali, PCdoB
Structure
Seats513
Camara dos Deputados do Brasil 2019.svg
Political groups
Government (348)

Opposition (143)

  •      PT (55)
  •      PSB (32)
  •      PDT (28)
  •      PSOL (10)
  •      PCdoB (8)
  •      PPS (8)
  •      PMN (1)
  •      REDE (1)

Independent (22)

Length of term
4 years
Elections
Open list proportional representation
Last election
October 7, 2018
Next election
October 2, 2022
Meeting place
976088-16092015- wdo6763.jpg
Ulysses Guimarães plenary chamber
National Congress building
Brasília, Federal District, Brazil
Website
www.camara.gov.br
Coat of arms of Brazil.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Brazil
Flag of Brazil.svg Brazilportal

The Chamber of Deputies (Portuguese : Câmara dos Deputados) is a federal legislative body and the lower house of the National Congress of Brazil. The chamber comprises 513 deputies, who are elected by proportional representation to serve four-year terms. The current President of the Chamber is the deputy Rodrigo Maia (DEM-RJ), who was elected in July 14, 2016 to serve for the remainder of the 2015–2016 term.

Portuguese language Romance language that originated in Portugal

Portuguese is a Western Romance language originating in the Iberian Peninsula. It is the sole official language of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Angola, and São Tomé and Príncipe. It also has co-official language status in East Timor, Equatorial Guinea and Macau in China. As the result of expansion during colonial times, a cultural presence of Portuguese and Portuguese creole speakers are also found in Goa, Daman and Diu in India; in Batticaloa on the east coast of Sri Lanka; in the Indonesian island of Flores; in the Malacca state of Malaysia; and the ABC islands in the Caribbean where Papiamento is spoken, while Cape Verdean Creole is the most widely spoken Portuguese-based Creole. Reintegrationists maintain that Galician is not a separate language, but a dialect of Portuguese. A Portuguese-speaking person or nation is referred to as "Lusophone" (Lusófono).

A lower house is one of two chambers of a bicameral legislature, the other chamber being the upper house.

National Congress of Brazil Congres of Brasil

The National Congress of Brazil is the legislative body of Brazil's federal government. Unlike the state Legislative Assemblies and Municipal Chambers, the Congress is bicameral, composed of the Federal Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. The Congress meets annually in Brasília, from 2 February to 27 July and from 1 August to 22 December.

Contents

Legislatures

The legislatures are counted from the first meeting of the Chamber of Deputies and of the Senate, on 6 May 1826, in the imperial era (the Chamber of Deputies met for preparatory sessions from 29 April 1826 to elect its officers and conduct other preliminary business, but the Legislature was formally opened on 6 May). The Chamber of Deputies and the Senate were created by Brazil's first Constitution, the Constitution of the Empire of Brazil, adopted in 1824. The numbering of the legislatures is continuous and counts all bicameral legislatures elected since the adoption of the 1824 Constitution including the imperial General Assembly and the republican National Congress. The previous constituent and legislative assembly of the Empire of Brazil, a unicameral national assembly convened in 1823 and dissolved by Emperor Pedro I before the Constitution was adopted, is not counted. The inauguration of a new composition of Chamber of Deputies for a four-year term of office marks the start of a new Legislature.

Constitution of Brazil national Constitution, created 1988

The Constitution of the Federative Republic of Brazil is the supreme law of Brazil. It is the foundation and source of the legal authority underlying the existence of Brazil and the federal government of Brazil. It provides the framework for the organization of the Brazilian government and for the relationship of the federal government to the states, to citizens, and to all people within Brazil.

Empire of Brazil 19th-century empire in South America

The Empire of Brazil was a 19th-century state that broadly comprised the territories which form modern Brazil and Uruguay. Its government was a representative parliamentary constitutional monarchy under the rule of Emperors Dom Pedro I and his son Dom Pedro II. A colony of the Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil became the seat of the Portuguese colonial Empire in 1808, when the Portuguese Prince regent, later King Dom João VI, fled from Napoleon's invasion of Portugal and established himself and his government in the Brazilian city of Rio de Janeiro. João VI later returned to Portugal, leaving his eldest son and heir, Pedro, to rule the Kingdom of Brazil as regent. On 7 September 1822, Pedro declared the independence of Brazil and, after waging a successful war against his father's kingdom, was acclaimed on 12 October as Pedro I, the first Emperor of Brazil. The new country was huge but sparsely populated and ethnically diverse.

Pedro I of Brazil Emperor of Brazil and later King of Portugal

Dom Pedro I, nicknamed "the Liberator", was the founder and first ruler of the Empire of Brazil. As King Dom Pedro IV, he reigned briefly over Portugal, where he also became known as "the Liberator" as well as "the Soldier King". Born in Lisbon, Pedro I was the fourth child of King Dom João VI of Portugal and Queen Carlota Joaquina, and thus a member of the House of Braganza. When their country was invaded by French troops in 1807, he and his family fled to Portugal's largest and wealthiest colony, Brazil.

In the imperial era the national legislature was named General Assembly. It was made up of the Chamber of Deputies and the Senate. Senators were elected for life and the Senate was a permanent institution, whereas the Chamber of Deputies, unless dissolved earlier, was elected every four years. When Brazil became a republic and a federal state the model of a bicameral Legislature was retained at the federal level, but the parliament was renamed National Congress. The National Congress is made up of the Chamber of Deputies and the Federal Senate. Both houses have fixed terms and cannot be dissolved earlier. Under Brazil's present Constitution, adopted in 1988, senators are elected to eight-year terms and deputies are elected every four years.

Each Brazilian state (and the Federal District) is represented in the Senate by three senators.

Elections to the Senate are held every four years, with either a third or two thirds of the seats up for election.

The number of deputies elected is proportional to the size of the population of the respective state (or of the Federal District) as of 1994. However, no delegation can be made up of less than eight or more than seventy seats. Thus the least populous state elects eight Federal Deputies and the most populous elects seventy. These restrictions favour the smaller states at the expense of the more populous states and so the size of the delegations is not exactly proportional to population.

Elections to the Chamber of Deputies are held every four years, with all seats up for election.

Empire of Brazil [1]

Old Republic [2]

Vargas Era [3]

Legislatures elected under the Republic of 46 [4]

Legislatures elected under the Military Regime

Legislatures elected after the restoration of civilian government ("New Republic")

Federal representation

The number of seats per state is distributed according to the number of inhabitants per state, according to the official measurement taken by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics through a census held each 10 years. The Brazilian population is represented by one deputy for each 362,013 inhabitants on average, but this proportionality is limited by having a minimum of eight members and a maximum of seventy members per state, these criteria being subject to an apportionment paradox.

Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics Brazils principal government institution in charge of statistics and census data

The Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics or IBGE is the agency responsible for official collection of statistical, geographic, cartographic, geodetic and environmental information in Brazil. IBGE performs a decennial national census; questionnaires account for information such as age, household income, literacy, education, occupation and hygiene levels.

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. The term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

An apportionment paradox exists when the rules for apportionment in a political system produce results which are unexpected or seem to violate common sense.

Therefore, states with 3,258,117 inhabitants upwards have 9 to 70 deputies. Following this scenario for example the city of São Paulo with its 11,253,503 inhabitants [6] is represented by 31 deputies of the total members of the state and the rest of the state with its 28,670,588 inhabitants are represented by 39 MPs (Member of Parliament). [7]

São Paulo Municipality in Brazil

São Paulo is a municipality in the Southeast Region of Brazil. The metropolis is an alpha global city and the most populous city in Brazil, the Western Hemisphere and the Southern Hemisphere, besides being the largest Portuguese-speaking city in the world. The municipality is also the Earth's 11th largest city proper by population. The city is the capital of the surrounding state of São Paulo, the most populous and wealthiest state in Brazil. It exerts strong international influences in commerce, finance, arts and entertainment. The name of the city honors the Apostle, Saint Paul of Tarsus. The city's metropolitan area, the Greater São Paulo, ranks as the most populous in Brazil and the 12th most populous on Earth. The process of conurbation between the metropolitan areas located around the Greater São Paulo created the São Paulo Macrometropolis, a megalopolis with more than 30 million inhabitants, one of the most populous urban agglomerations in the world.

There is a distorted representation of the Brazilian states in congress, having some groups of deputies representing on average more than the proportion of the population of the state, and others representing less. That proportionality means that Roraima is represented by a representative for every 51,000 inhabitants and, at the other extreme, São Paulo is represented by one representative for every 585,000 inhabitants. This difference is reflected in the representation of the states in the Brazilian Congress with deputations for states as Roraima with 681% of the population represented by their deputies in the Congress, and less proportionality for the population of the state of São Paulo with 63% of the population represented by their deputies in the Congress, where proportionality is the percentage of representatives in the chamber divided by the percentage of the population. The population of the state of São Paulo, because of the maximum limits of 70 MPs for any one state, give up having 40 more seats in congress compared to the other states. [8]

Roraima State of Brazil

Roraima is the northernmost and least populated state of Brazil, located in the Amazon region. It borders the states of Amazonas and Pará, as well as the nations of Venezuela and Guyana. The population is approximately 450,000 (2010) and the capital is Boa Vista. Roraima is the Brazilian state with the fewest municipalities, 15 in total.

Federal stateNumber of members% Of total membersPopulation (on the census also called Censo 2010)% Of the population (Censo 2010)Representativeness (Inhabitants / Mr)Representatives of national average% Representative distortion% Of the population represented by MPsDeputies required ignoring the limits
São Paulo 7013.6%39,924,09121.5%570,344110-7.90%63%40
Minas Gerais 5310.3%19,159,26010.3%361,495530.00%100%0
Rio de Janeiro 469%15,180,6368.2%330,014420.80%110%-4
Bahia 397.6%13,633,9697.3%349,589380.30%104%-1
Rio Grande do Sul 316%10,576,7585.7%341,186290.30%106%-2
Paraná 305.8%10,226,7375.5%340,891280.30%106%-2
Pernambuco 254.9%8,541,2504.6%341,650240.30%106%-1
Ceará 224.3%8,450,5274.4%371,82223-0.10%94%1
Maranhão 183.5%6,424,3403.5%356,908180.00%101%0
Goiás 173.3%5,849,1053.1%344,065160.20%105%-1
Pará 173.3%7,443,9044%437,87721-0.70%83%4
Santa Catarina 163.1%6,178,6033.3%386,16317-0.20%94%1
Paraíba 122.3%3,753,6332%312,803100.30%116%-2
Espírito Santo 101.9%3,392,7751.8%339,27890.10%107%-1
Piauí 101.9%3,086,4481.7%308,64590.20%117%-1
Alagoas 91.7%3,093,9941.7%343,77790.00%105%0
Acre 81.6%707,1250.4%88,39121.20%410%-6
Amazonas 81.6%3,350,7731.8%418,8479-0.20%86%1
Amapá 81.6%648,5530.3%81,06921.30%447%-6
Distrito Federal 81.6%2,469,4891.3%308,68670.30%117%-1
Mato Grosso do Sul 81.6%2,404,2561.3%300,53270.30%120%-1
Mato Grosso 81.6%2,954,6251.6%369,32880.00%98%0
Rio Grande do Norte 81.6%3,121,4511.7%390,1819-0.10%93%1
Rondônia 81.6%1,535,6250.8%191,95340.80%189%-4
Roraima 81.6%425,3980.2%53,17511.40%681%-7
Sergipe 81.6%2,036,2271.1%254,52860.50%142%-2
Tocantins 81.6%1,373,5510.7%171,69440.90%211%-4
Total513100%185,712,713100%362,013 (representative national average)514(Population / representative national average)0.30% accumulated (% of total members -% of the population) 156%average (number of members / Representatives of national average) 1

Present composition

Leaderships

PartyRepresentativesLeaderPosition
PSL 52Delegado WaldirGovernment
PT 56Paulo PimentaOpposition
PP 38Arthur LiraGovernment
PSD 35André de PaulaGovernment
MDB 34Baleia RossiGovernment
PR 33José RochaGovernment
PSB 32Tadeu AlencarOpposition
PRB 30Jhonatan de JesusGovernment
PSDB 29Carlos SampaioGovernment
DEM 29Elmar NascimentoGovernment
PDT 28 André Figueiredo Opposition
PODE 11José NeltoGovernment
PTB 10Pedro Lucas FernandesGovernment
PSOL 10 Ivan Valente Opposition
PCdoB 10Orlando SilvaOpposition
NOVO 8 Marcel van Hattem Government
PROS 8Acácio FavachoOpposition
PSC 8 Gilberto Nascimento Government
PPS 8Daniel CoelhoOpposition
AVANTE 7Luis TibéIndependent
PHS 6TBDIndependent
PATRI 5Fred CostaGovernment
PRP 4TBDIndependent
PV 4Leandre dal PonteIndependent
PMN 3Eduardo BraideOpposition
PTC 2TBDIndependent
REDE 1Joênia WapichanaOpposition
DC 1Luiz Antônio CorrêaIndependent

Partisan blocs composition

BlocRepresentativesLeader
GovernmentTBDMajor Vitor Hugo (PSL)
MajorityTBDTBD
OppositionTBDTBD
MinorityTBDTBD
PSL, PP, PSD, MDB, PR, PRB, DEM, PSDB, PTB, PSC, PMN Bloc300Elmar Nascimento (DEM)
PDT, SOLIDARIEDADE, PODE, PCdoB, PROS, PPS, AVANTE, PATRI, PV, DC Bloc94 André Figueiredo (PDT)

Bodies

The House of Representatives is composed of the Bureau of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil by College Leaders and the Commissions, which can be permanent, temporary, or special inquiry.

Bureau of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil

The current composition of the Board of the Chamber of Deputies is the following:

President: Rodrigo Maia (DEM-RJ)
1st Vice President: Marcos Pereira (PRB-SP)
2nd Vice President: Luciano Bivar (PSL-PE)
1st Secretary: Soraya Santos (PR-RJ)
2nd Secretary: Mário Heringer (PDT-MG)
3rd Secretary: Fábio Faria (PSD-RN)
4th Secretary: André Fufuca (PP-MA)
1st Secretary Substitute: Rafael Motta (PSB-RN)
2nd Secretary Substitute: Geovania de Sá (PSDB-SC)
3rd Secretary Substitute: Isnaldo Bulhões Jr. (MDB-AL)
4th Secretary Substitute: Assis Carvalho (PT-PI)

Standing committees

On March 6 of 2012, was defined division of committees between parties. The President's House, Marco Maia, believes that the proportionality between the parties / blocs must take into account the data of the last election. Thus, PT and PMDB, with the highest benches, were three committees (the PT made the choice first). DEM and PSDB, the two largest opposition, were two commissions each. [9] On the other hand, PSD, most harmed by this decision, filed a lawsuit in the Supreme Court (STF) trying to reverse this decision. [10]

The chair of the committee, was defined as follows: [11]

CommissionPresident (party)StateSiteContact
Committee on Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development and Supply [12] Sérgio Souza (MDB) Paraná Link Contato
Commission of the Amazon, National Integration and Regional Development [13] Valadares Filho (PSB) Sergipe Link Contato
Committee on Science and Technology, Communication and Information [14] Paulo Magalhães (PSD) Bahia Link Contato
Committee on Constitution, Justice and Citizenship [15] Rodrigo Pacheco (MDB) Minas Gerais Link Contato
Committee on Consumer Protection [16] Rodrigo Martins (PSB) Piauí Link Contato
Committee for Economic Development, Industry and Commerce [17] Lucas Vergilio (SOLIDARIEDADE) Goiás Link Contato
Urban Development Commission [18] Givaldo Vieira (PT) Espírito Santo Link Contato
Commission on Human Rights and Minorities [19] Paulão (PT) Alagoas Link Contato
Committee on Education [20] Caio Nárcio (PSDB) Minas Gerais Link Contato
Committee on Culture [21] Thiago Peixoto (PSD) Goiás Link Contato
Committee on Finance and Taxation [22] Covatti Filho (PP) Rio Grande do Sul Link Contato
Commission of Financial Supervision and Control [23] Wilson Filho (PTB) Paraíba Link Contato
Participative Legislation Committee [24] Fávia Morais (PDT) Goiás Link Contato
Committee on Environment and Sustainable Development [25] Nilto Tatto (PT) São Paulo Link Contato
Committee on Mines and Energy [26] Jhonatan de Jesus (PRB) Roraima Link Contato
Committee on Foreign Relations and National Defense [27] Bruna Furlan (PSDB) São Paulo Link Contato
Public Safety Commission and Combating Organized Crime [28] Capitão Augusto (PR) São Paulo Link Contato
Commission on Social Security and Family [29] Hiran Gonçalves (PP) Roraima Link Contato
Committee on Labor, Public Service and Administration [30] Orlando Silva (PCdoB) São Paulo Link Contato
Commission for Tourism [31] Paulo Azi (DEM) Bahia Link Contato
Commission for Sports [32] Ezequiel Teixeira (PODE) Rio de Janeiro Link Contato
Commission of Roads and Transport [33] Altineu Côrtes (MDB) Rio de Janeiro Link Contato
Commission of Defense of Women's Rights [34] Shéridan (PSDB) Roraima Link Link
Commission of Defense of Elderly's Rights [35] Gilberto Nascimento (PSC) São Paulo Link Link
Commission of Defense of Disabled People [36] Cabo Sabino (PR) Ceará Link Link

See also

Related Research Articles

Congress of the Union Mexican Congress

The Congress of the Union, formally known as the General Congress of the United Mexican States, is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of Mexico consisting of two chambers: the Senate of the Republic and the Chamber of Deputies.

Chamber of Deputies (Mexico) lower house of the parliament of Mexico

The Chamber of Deputies is the lower house of the Congress of the Union, the bicameral legislature of Mexico. The other chamber is the Senate. The structure and responsibilities of both chambers of Congress are defined in Articles 50 to 70 of the current constitution.

Aécio Neves Brazilian politician

Aécio Neves da Cunha is a Brazilian economist, politician and former president of the Brazilian Social Democracy Party (PSDB). He was the 17th Governor of Minas Gerais from 1 January 2003 to 31 March 2010, and is currently a member of the Brazilian Federal Senate. He lost in the runoff presidential election against Dilma Rousseff in 2014.

Elections in Brazil

Brazil elects on the national level a head of state—the president—and a legislature. The president is elected to a four-year term by absolute majority vote through a two-round system. The National Congress has two chambers. The Chamber of Deputies has 513 members, elected to a four-year term by proportional representation. The Federal Senate has 81 members, elected to an eight-year term, with elections every four years for alternatively one-third and two-third of the seats. Brazil has a multi-party system, with such numerous parties that often no one party has a chance of gaining power alone, and so they must work with each other to form coalition governments.

Enéas Carneiro Brazilian politician

Enéas Ferreira Carneiro was a Brazilian cardiologist, physicist, mathematician, professor, writer and politician. He represented the state of São Paulo in the National Chamber of Deputies and ran for presidency three times. He was founder and leader of the nationalist and conservative Party of the Reconstruction of the National Order (PRONA), which was usually seen as being far-right.

The Social Christian Party is a conservative political party in Brazil.

President of the Chamber of Deputies (Brazil) head of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil, second in line of presidential succession

The President of the Chamber of Deputies is the speaker of the lower house of the National Congress of Brazil, elected by his peers for a two-year term.

Federal government of Mexico

The Federal government of Mexico is the national government of the United Mexican States, the central government established by its constitution to share sovereignty over the republic with the governments of the 31 individual Mexican states, and to represent such governments before international bodies such as the United Nations. The Mexican federal government has three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial and functions per the Constitution of the United Mexican States, as enacted in 1917, and as amended.

Federal government of Brazil executive authority of Brazil

The Federal Government of Brazil is the national government of the Federative Republic of Brazil, a republic in South America divided in 26 states and a federal district. The Brazilian federal government is divided in three branches: the executive, which is headed by the President and the cabinet; the legislative, whose powers are vested by the Constitution in the National Congress; and the judiciary, whose powers are vested in the Supreme Federal Court and lower federal courts. The seat of the federal government is located in Brasília. This has led to "Brasília" commonly being used as a metonym for the federal government of Brazil.

Ralph Biasi was a Brazilian civil engineer who was elected the youngest mayor of the city of Americana, São Paulo, in the 1970s. He was responsible for various infrastructure improvements. He was a three-term federal deputy between 1979 and 1991, and was the federal Minister of Science and Technology from 1988 to 1989.

Chamber of Deputies of Portugal (1910-1926)

The Chamber of Deputies of the Portuguese Republic, alternatively translatable as the House of Representatives, was the lower house of the Congress of the Republic, the legislature of the First Portuguese Republic. The Chamber of Deputies was elected for a three-year term and had the power to lay taxes, Initiate Constitutional Amendments and Legislation regarding the Armed Forces, debate on bills proposed by the Executive, and decide on the extension of the legislative term.

The Senate was the upper house of the Parliament of Portugal during the periods of validity of the Constitution of 1838 (1838-1842) and of the Constitution of 1911 (1911-1933).

Eduardo Bolsonaro Brazilian politician

Eduardo Nantes Bolsonaro is a Brazilian lawyer, federal police officer and politician. He is the third child of Jair Bolsonaro, the 38th President of Brazil.

Flávio Bolsonaro Brazilian politician from Rio de Janeiro

Flávio Nantes Bolsonaro is a Brazilian lawyer, entrepreneur and politician, who is the eldest child of Brazilian President, Jair Bolsonaro.

Carlos Nantes Bolsonaro is a Brazilian politician and the second son of the 38th President of Brazil, Jair Bolsonaro.

Carla Zambelli Salgado is a project manager and Brazilian political and political activist. Founder of the movement On the Streets, gained notoriety by the activism in favor of the impeachment of the ex-president Dilma Rousseff. In the elections of 2018, she was elected federal deputy by São Paulo, by the Social Liberal Party (PSL).

2019 President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil election

The 2019 President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil election took place on 1 February 2019, following the opening of the 1st session of the 56th Legislature of the National Congress, almost four months after the 2018 elections.

2015 President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil election

The 2015 President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil election took place on 1 February 2015, following the opening of the 55th Legislature of the National Congress. President Henrique Eduardo Alves (PMDB-RN) wasn't reelect federal deputy, but his caucus mate, Eduardo Cunha (PMDB-RJ), was chosen as the party's candidate. Cunha received 267 votes, over the majority of the Chamber, to become its president. PT leader Arlindo Chinaglia (PT-SP) garnered 136, and 100 votes to Júlio Delgado (PSB-MG), 8 to Chico Alencar (PSOL-RJ), and 2 blank votes.

References

  1. "O Império do Brasil". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  2. "A 1ª República". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  3. "A 2a República". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  4. "A 4a República". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  5. Constitutional Amendment 26, of 27 November 1985
  6. "IBGE Censo 2010". www.censo2010.ibge.gov.br. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  7. "MP" . Retrieved 22 March 2018 via The Free Dictionary.
  8. "Gasto com deputados caminha para R$ 1 bilhão". uol.com.br. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  9. Finch, Nathalia (March 6, 2012), G1, defines the distribution of the standing committeesMissing or empty |title= (help); |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  10. Santos, Deborah (February 27, 2012), G1, going to have the Supreme Command of committees in the HouseMissing or empty |title= (help); |access-date= requires |url= (help)
  11. "Eleitos os presidentes das 25 comissões da Câmara" (in Portuguese). Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. 23 March 2017. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  12. "Comissão de Agricultura, Pecuária, Abastecimento e Desenvolvimento Rural - CAPADR". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  13. "Comissão de Integração Nacional, Desenvolvimento Regional e da Amazônia - CINDRA". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  14. "Comissão de Ciência e Tecnologia, Comunicação e Informática - CCTCI". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  15. "Comissão de Constituição e Justiça e de Cidadania - CCJC". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  16. "Comissão de Defesa do Consumidor - CDC". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  17. "Comissão de Desenvolvimento Econômico, Indústria, Comércio e Serviços - CDEICS". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  18. "Comissão de Desenvolvimento Urbano - CDU". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  19. "Comissão de Direitos Humanos e Minorias - CDHM". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  20. "Comissão de Educação - CE". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  21. "Comissão de Cultura - CCULT". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  22. "Comissão de Finanças e Tributação - CFT". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  23. "Comissão de Fiscalização Financeira e Controle - CFFC". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  24. "Comissão de Legislação Participativa - CLP". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  25. "Comissão de Meio Ambiente e Desenvolvimento Sustentável - CMADS". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  26. "Comissão de Minas e Energia - CME". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  27. "Comissão de Relações Exteriores e de Defesa Nacional - CREDN". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  28. "Comissão de Segurança Pública e Combate ao Crime Organizado - CSPCCO". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  29. "Comissão de Seguridade Social e Família - CSSF". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  30. "Comissão de Trabalho, de Administração e Serviço Público - CTASP". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  31. "Comissão de Turismo – CTUR". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  32. "Comissão do Esporte - CESPO". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  33. "Eleições para mesa diretora da CVT acontecerão na próxima terça". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  34. "Comissão de Defesa dos Direitos da Mulher - Mulher — Portal da Câmara dos Deputados". camara.leg.br. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  35. "Comissão de Defesa dos Direitos da Pessoa Idosa - Idoso — Portal da Câmara dos Deputados". camara.leg.br. Retrieved 22 March 2018.
  36. "Comissão de Defesa dos Direitos das Pessoas com Deficiência - CPD". Portal da Câmara dos Deputados. Retrieved 22 March 2018.