Changdo County

Last updated
Ch'angdo County
창도군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Ch'angd-gun
   Revised Romanization Changdo-gun
NK-Gangwon-Changdo.png
Map of Kangwon showing the location of Changdo
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 16 ri
Area
  Total696 km2 (269 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total33,000

Ch'angdo County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Originally part of Kimhwa, it was split off as a separate county in 1952.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Geography

Ch'angdo lies to the west of the Taebaek Mountains, in the Ryŏngsŏ region of Kangwŏn, but is nonetheless quite rugged. The highest point is Okpatpong (옥밭봉), 1240 m above sea level. Ch'angdo lies just north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. The chief stream is the Pukhan River, which flows southward across the DMZ into South Korea. Roughly 80% of the county's area is forestland.

Taebaek Mountains mountain range on the Korean peninsula

The Taebaek Mountains are a mountain range that stretches across North Korea and South Korea. They form the main ridge of the Korean peninsula.

Yeongseo

Yeongseo is the western, inland region of Gangwon Province, South Korea and Kangwon Province, North Korea. It is divided from the coastal Yeongdong region by the Taebaek Mountains. The name yeongseo reflects this distinction; it literally means “west of the passes”. The region is marked by high plateaus and mountains, with deep valleys. The Han and Nakdong Rivers both have their headwaters in this region. Agriculture in Yeongseo was traditionally carried out by slash-and-burn methods, but in modern times this has largely been replaced by other techniques, including high-altitude shiitake farming.

Korean Demilitarized Zone Demilitarized zone running across the Korean Peninsula

The Korean Demilitarized Zone is a strip of land running across the Korean Peninsula. It is established by the provisions of the Korean Armistice Agreement to serve as a buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea. The demilitarized zone (DMZ) is a border barrier that divides the Korean Peninsula roughly in half. It was created by agreement between North Korea, the People's Republic of China and the United Nations Command in 1953. The DMZ is 250 kilometres long, and about 4 kilometres wide.

Administrative divisions

Ch'angdo county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 16 ri (villages):

  • Ch'angdo-ŭp
  • Changhyŏl-li
  • Chisŏng-ri
  • Ch'ujŏl-li
  • Koksal-li
  • Kŭmsal-li
  • Kuryong-ri
  • Kyoju-ri
  • Myŏng'u-ri
  • P'angyo-ri
  • Sadong-ri
  • Sanwŏl-li
  • Sinsŏng-ri
  • Sŏngdo-ri
  • Songp'o-ri
  • Taebaeng-ri
  • Tangsal-li

Economy

The chief local industry is agriculture, including sericulture and livestock farming. Lumbermills have also been developed, but there is little other industry. There are deposits of copper, zinc, nickel, and lead.

Sericulture process of silk production

Sericulture, or silk farming, is the cultivation of silkworms to produce silk. Although there are several commercial species of silkworms, Bombyx mori is the most widely used and intensively studied silkworm. Silk was believed to have first been produced in China as early as the Neolithic period. Sericulture has become an important cottage industry in countries such as Brazil, China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, and Russia. Today, China and India are the two main producers, with more than 60% of the world's annual production.

Transportation

Ch'angdo is connected to the rest of North Korea by road, but not by rail. Google Earth imagery from 2017 shows a newly constructed emergency highway landing strip for aircraft and is equipped with two aircraft parking revetments located to the north of Changdo city.

Google Earth 3D globe-based map program created by Google

Google Earth is a computer program that renders a 3D representation of Earth based primarily on satellite imagery. The program maps the Earth by superimposing satellite images, aerial photography, and GIS data onto a 3D globe, allowing users to see cities and landscapes from various angles. Users can explore the globe by entering addresses and coordinates, or by using a keyboard or mouse. The program can also be downloaded on a smartphone or tablet, using a touch screen or stylus to navigate. Users may use the program to add their own data using Keyhole Markup Language and upload them through various sources, such as forums or blogs. Google Earth is able to show various kinds of images overlaid on the surface of the earth and is also a Web Map Service client.

Revetment (aircraft)

A revetment, in military aviation, is a parking area for one or more aircraft that is surrounded by blast walls on three sides. These walls are as much about protecting neighbouring aircraft as it is to protect the aircraft within the revetment. If a combat aircraft fully loaded with fuel and munitions was to somehow be set on fire, by accident or design, then it could start a chain reaction, as the destruction of individual aircraft could set ablaze its neighbours. The blast walls around a revetment are designed to channel blast and damage upwards and outwards away from neighbouring aircraft.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in east Asia on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

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