Charles A. West

Last updated
Charles A. West
Biographical details
Born(1890-03-13)March 13, 1890
Cherokee, Iowa
DiedOctober 29, 1957(1957-10-29) (aged 67)
Grand Forks, North Dakota
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1919–1927 South Dakota State
1928–1941 North Dakota
1945 North Dakota
1946–1948 Winnipeg Blue Bombers
Basketball
1919–1926 South Dakota State
1944–1945 North Dakota
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1928–1946 North Dakota
Head coaching record
Overall134–55–14 (college football)
74–66 (college basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
11 NCC (1922, 1924, 1926, 1928–1931, 1934, 1936–1937, 1939)

Charles Aaron "Jack" West (March 13, 1890 – October 29, 1957) was an American football, Canadian football, and basketball coach and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at South Dakota State College of Agricultural and Mechanic Artsnow South Dakota State University from 1919 to 1927 and at the University of North Dakota from 1928 to 1941 and again in 1945, compiling a career college football record of 134–55–14. West was also the head basketball coach at South Dakota State from 1919 to 1926 and at North Dakota during the 1944–45 season, amassing a career college basketball record of 74–66. He coached football teams to 11 North Central Conference titles, three at South Dakota State and eight at North Dakota. In addition, he served as North Dakota's athletic director from 1928 to 1946. West left the college ranks in 1946 to become head coach of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, then of the Western Interprovincial Football Union, now a division of the Canadian Football League. [1] He died at the age of 67 on October 29, 1957 at his home in Grand Forks, North Dakota. [2]

Contents

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
South Dakota State Jackrabbits (Independent)(1919–1921)
1919 South Dakota State4–1–1
1920 South Dakota State 4–2–1
1921 South Dakota State 7–1
South Dakota State Jackrabbits (North Central Conference)(1922–1927)
1922 South Dakota State 5–4–14–1–11st
1923 South Dakota State 3–42–34th
1924 South Dakota State 7–15–01st
1925 South Dakota State 2–3–21–1–25th
1926 South Dakota State 8–1–33–0–21st
1927 South Dakota State 5–32–2T–3rd
South Dakota State:45–20–817–7–5
North Dakota Flickertails / Fighting Sioux (North Central Conference)(1928–1941)
1928 North Dakota 6–1–14–01st
1929 North Dakota 9–14–01st
1930 North Dakota 9–14–01st
1931 North Dakota 8–1–24–01st
1932 North Dakota 7–12–12nd
1933 North Dakota 3–5–11–2–13rd
1934 North Dakota 7–13–11st
1935 North Dakota 6–2–23–0–22nd
1936 North Dakota 9–24–01st
1937 North Dakota 4–43–01st
1938 North Dakota 6–23–12nd
1939 North Dakota 5–34–1T–1st
1940 North Dakota 5–43–12nd
1941 North Dakota 4–53–13rd
North Dakota Fighting Sioux (North Central Conference)(1945)
1945 North Dakota 1–2NANA
North Dakota:89–35–643–8–3
Total:134–55–14
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. "West to Coach Winnipeg Team" (PDF). The New York Times . Associated Press. March 22, 1946. Retrieved December 9, 2011.
  2. "Jack West Dies At Grand Forks". Saskatoon Star-Phoenix . Associated Press. October 30, 1957. Retrieved December 9, 2011 via Google News.