Charles Arnison

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Charles Henry Arnison
Born(1893-01-13)13 January 1893
Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, England
Died4 September 1974(1974-09-04) (aged 81)
Hammersmith, London
AllegianceUnited Kingdom
Service/branchRoyal Flying Corps
Royal Air Force
Years of service1917–1920
RankLieutenant
Unit No. 62 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars World War I
World War II
Awards Military Cross

Lieutenant Charles Henry Arnison MC (13 January 1893 – 4 September 1974) was a British World War I flying ace credited with nine aerial victories. He won the Military Cross for valour in World War I, and returned to the RAF to serve in World War II.

Contents

Early life

Charles Henry Arnison was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne on 13 January 1893. [1]

World War I

On 26 May 1917 Sergeant C. H. Arnison of the Territorial Force was commissioned as a second lieutenant and transferred to the General List of the Royal Flying Corps. [2] On 28 June 1917 he was confirmed as a second lieutenant and appointed a flying officer. [3]

By early 1918, he was assigned to 62 Squadron as a Bristol F.2 Fighter pilot; he began his victories with them with a win on 12 April 1918, and ran his string out at nine with his last victory on 15 May 1918. [1] On both 6 and 20 June 1918 he was reported wounded in Flight magazine, although it is uncertain if this is a reference to two separate woundings. [4] [5] His exploits won him the Military Cross, gazetted 16 September 1918:

....He has destroyed four enemy aircraft and driven down four others completely out of control. He has always shown the greatest skill, keenness and gallantry, and has been largely instrumental in the fine achievements of his squadron. [6]

He also won a Distinguished Flying Cross. [7]

Arnison remained in the Royal Air Force after the war. On 28 October 1919 he was appointed as a Flight Lieutenant in the reorganized RAF. [8] However, less than a year later, on 6 October 1920, he retired due to injuries, retaining his rank. [9]

World War II

On 25 January 1941, Arnison was commissioned as a probationary flying officer in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, and assigned to the Administrative and Special Duties Branch. [10]

On 17 July 1941 he was reported wounded or injured in action in Flight magazine. [11]

Post-war Arnison remained on the RAF List of Reserve Officers until relinquishing his commission on 11 May 1954. [12]

List of aerial victories

No.Date/timeAircraftFoeResultLocationNotes
112 April 1918 @ 1420 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter serial number C4859Albatros D.V fighterDriven down out of controlEast of Estaires Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
221 April 1918 @ 1000 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Pfalz D.III fighterDriven down out of controlEstaires-Lille Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
321 April 1918 @ 1000 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Pfalz D.III fighterDriven down out of controlEstaires-LilleObserver/gunner: Samuel Parry
43 May 1918 @ 1115 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Albatros D.V fighterDriven down out of controlEast of ArmentièresObserver/gunner: Samuel Parry
53 May 1918 @ 1116 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Albatros D.V fighterDriven down out of controlEast of ArmentièresObserver/gunner: Samuel Parry
63 May 1918 @ 1117 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Albatros D.V fighterDestroyed by fireEast of ArmentièresObserver/gunner: Samuel Parry killed in action
79 May 1918Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Pfalz D.III fighterDestroyedSouth of Herlies Observer/gunner: Horace Ernest Merritt
89 May 1918Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859Pfalz D.III fighterDriven down out of controlNortheast of La Bassée Observer/gunner: Horace Ernest Merritt
915 May 1918 @ 1745 hoursBristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859German reconnaissance planeDestroyed Albert-Ayette Observer/gunner: C. D. Wells [1] [7]

Endnotes

  1. 1 2 3 "Charles Henry Arnison". theaerodrome.com. 2014. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  2. "Royal Flying Corps: Appointments". Flight . IX (456): 980. 20 September 1917. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  3. "No. 30286". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 September 1917. p. 9540.
  4. "The Roll of Honour: Wounded". Flight . X (23): 617. 6 June 1918. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  5. "The Roll of Honour: Wounded". Flight . X (25): 687. 20 June 1918. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  6. "No. 30901". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 September 1918. p. 10915.
  7. 1 2 Shores, et al, p. 53.
  8. "No. 31620". The London Gazette. 28 October 1919. p. 13139.
  9. "No. 32074". The London Gazette. 5 October 1920. p. 9695.
  10. "Administrative and Special Duties Branch". Flight . XXXIX (1680): 200. 6 March 1941. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  11. "Service Aviation: Wounded or Injured on Active Service". Flight . XL (1699): 40. 17 July 1941. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  12. "No. 40169". The London Gazette. 7 May 1954. p. 2773.

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References