Charles Arnison

Last updated

Charles Henry Arnison
Born(1893-01-13)13 January 1893
Newcastle Upon Tyne, Northumberland, England
Died 4 September 1974(1974-09-04) (aged 81)
Hammersmith, London
Allegiance United Kingdom
Service/branch Royal Flying Corps
Royal Air Force
Years of service 1917–1920
Rank Lieutenant
Unit No. 62 Squadron RAF
Battles/wars World War I
World War II
Awards Military Cross

Lieutenant Charles Henry Arnison MC (13 January 1893 – 4 September 1974) was a British World War I flying ace credited with nine aerial victories. He won the Military Cross for valour in World War I, and returned to the RAF to serve in World War II.

Military Cross third-level military decoration of the British Armed Forces, Commonwealth officers

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

Flying ace distinction given to fighter pilots

A flying ace, fighter ace or air ace is a military aviator credited with shooting down several enemy aircraft during aerial combat. The actual number of aerial victories required to officially qualify as an ace has varied, but is usually considered to be five or more.

Contents

Early life

Charles Henry Arnison was born in Newcastle-on-Tyne on 13 January 1893. [1]

World War I

On 26 May 1917 Sergeant C. H. Arnison of the Territorial Force was commissioned as a second lieutenant and transferred to the General List of the Royal Flying Corps. [2] On 28 June 1917 he was confirmed as a second lieutenant and appointed a Flying Officer. [3]

Sergeant military rank

Sergeant is a rank in many uniformed organizations, principally military and policing forces. The alternate spelling, "serjeant", is used in The Rifles and other units that draw their heritage from the British Light Infantry. Its origin is the Latin "serviens", "one who serves", through the French term "sergent".

Territorial Force former volunteer reserve component of the British Army

The Territorial Force was a part-time volunteer component of the British Army, created in 1908 to augment British land forces without resorting to conscription. The new organisation consolidated the 19th-century Volunteer Force and yeomanry into a unified auxiliary, commanded by the War Office and administered by local County Territorial Associations. The Territorial Force was designed to reinforce the regular army in expeditionary operations abroad, but because of political opposition it was assigned to home defence. Members were liable for service anywhere in the UK and could not be compelled to serve overseas. In the first two months of the First World War, territorials volunteered for foreign service in significant numbers, allowing territorial units to be deployed abroad. They saw their first action on the Western Front during the initial German offensive of 1914, and the force filled the gap between the near destruction of the regular army that year and the arrival of the New Army in 1915. Territorial units were deployed to Gallipoli in 1915 and, following the failure of that campaign, provided the bulk of the British contribution to allied forces in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign. By the war's end, the Territorial Force had fielded twenty-three infantry divisions and two mounted divisions on foreign soil. It was demobilised after the war and reconstituted in 1921 as the Territorial Army.

Second lieutenant is a junior commissioned officer military rank in many armed forces, comparable to NATO OF-1a rank.

By early 1918, he was assigned to 62 Squadron as a Bristol F.2 Fighter pilot; he began his victories with them with a win on 12 April 1918, and ran his string out at nine with his last victory on 15 May 1918. [1] On both 6 and 20 June 1918 he was reported wounded in Flight magazine, although it is uncertain if this is a reference to two separate woundings. [4] [5] His exploits won him the Military Cross, gazetted 16 September 1918:

Bristol F.2 Fighter fighter and reconnaissance aircraft

The Bristol F.2 Fighter was a British two-seat biplane fighter and reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War developed by Frank Barnwell at the Bristol Aeroplane Company. It is often simply called the Bristol Fighter, other popular names include the "Brisfit" or "Biff".

....He has destroyed four enemy aircraft and driven down four others completely out of control. He has always shown the greatest skill, keenness and gallantry, and has been largely instrumental in the fine achievements of his squadron. [6]

He also won a Distinguished Flying Cross. [7]

Arnison remained in the Royal Air Force after the war. On 28 October 1919 he was appointed as a Flight Lieutenant in the reorganized RAF. [8] However, less than a year later, on 6 October 1920, he retired due to injuries, retaining his rank. [9]

World War II

On 25 January 1941, Arnison was commissioned as a probationary Flying Officer in the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, and assigned to the Administrative and Special Duties Branch. [10]

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

The Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR) consists of a number of groupings of Royal Air Force reservists for the management and operation of the RAF's Volunteer Gliding Squadrons and Air Experience Flights of the Royal Air Force Air Cadets. It also forms the working elements of the University Air Squadrons and the Defence Technical Undergraduate Scheme. Unlike the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, the RAF Volunteer Reserve is not an active reserve from which members may be drawn to supplement the regular air force.

On 17 July 1941 he was reported wounded or injured in action in Flight magazine. [11]

Post-war Arnison remained on the RAF List of Reserve Officers until relinquishing his commission on 11 May 1954. [12]

List of aerial victories

No.Date/timeAircraftFoeResultLocationNotes
1 12 April 1918 @ 1420 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter serial number C4859 Albatros D.V fighter Driven down out of control East of Estaires Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
2 21 April 1918 @ 1000 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Pfalz D.III fighter Driven down out of control Estaires-Lille Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
3 21 April 1918 @ 1000 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Pfalz D.III fighter Driven down out of control Estaires-Lille Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
4 3 May 1918 @ 1115 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Albatros D.V fighter Driven down out of control East of Armentières Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
5 3 May 1918 @ 1116 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Albatros D.V fighter Driven down out of control East of Armentières Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry
6 3 May 1918 @ 1117 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Albatros D.V fighter Destroyed by fire East of Armentières Observer/gunner: Samuel Parry killed in action
7 9 May 1918 Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Pfalz D.III fighter Destroyed South of Herlies Observer/gunner: Horace Ernest Merritt
8 9 May 1918 Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 Pfalz D.III fighter Driven down out of control Northeast of La Bassée Observer/gunner: Horace Ernest Merritt
9 15 May 1918 @ 1745 hours Bristol F.2 Fighter s/n C4859 German reconnaissance plane Destroyed Albert-Ayette Observer/gunner: C. D. Wells [1] [7]

Endnotes

  1. 1 2 3 "Charles Henry Arnison". theaerodrome.com. 2014. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  2. "Royal Flying Corps: Appointments". Flight . IX (456): 980. 20 September 1917. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  3. "No. 30286". The London Gazette (Supplement). 14 September 1917. p. 9540.
  4. "The Roll of Honour: Wounded". Flight . X (23): 617. 6 June 1918. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  5. "The Roll of Honour: Wounded". Flight . X (25): 687. 20 June 1918. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  6. "No. 30901". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 September 1918. p. 10915.
  7. 1 2 Shores, et al, p. 53.
  8. "No. 31620". The London Gazette. 28 October 1919. p. 13139.
  9. "No. 32074". The London Gazette. 5 October 1920. p. 9695.
  10. "Administrative and Special Duties Branch". Flight . XXXIX (1680): 200. 6 March 1941. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  11. "Service Aviation: Wounded or Injured on Active Service". Flight . XL (1699): 40. 17 July 1941. Retrieved 6 August 2014.
  12. "No. 40169". The London Gazette. 7 May 1954. p. 2773.

Reference

Related Research Articles

Group Captain Geoffrey Hilton "Beery" Bowman, was an English World War I fighter ace credited with 32 victories. After attaining the rank of major in the Royal Flying Corps, he later became a group captain in the Royal Air Force.

Flying Officer George Searle Lomax Hayward was an English World War I aerial observer credited with 24 victories. He served as an observer/gunner for fellow aces Frank Weare, Ernest Elton, and William Lewis Wells. Hayward scored the bulk of his wins, 22 of them, between 6 March and 22 April 1918, usually scoring two or three times in the same fight.

Air Vice Marshal Sir Matthew Brown Frew, was a First World War flying ace, credited with 23 aerial victories, who went on to serve as a senior officer in the Royal Air Force and South African Air Force during the Second World War.

Major Thomas Sinclair Harrison was a World War I fighter ace credited with 22 aerial victories. He was a balloon buster, as he destroyed two enemy observation balloons. This made him the fourth highest scoring South African.

Captain Walter Alfred Southey was a British First World War flying ace, credited with twenty aerial victories, including five balloons, making him the second highest scoring ace in No. 84 Squadron, behind Andrew Beauchamp-Proctor.

Edward Gribben was a World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories. He became a lieutenant-colonel in the Territorial Army between the wars, returning to the RAF in World War II, and rising to the rank of squadron leader.

Group Captain Roger Henry Gartside Neville, was a British World War I flying ace credited with five aerial victories. He remained in the RAF post war serving as a squadron commander, and then as a staff officer, until after the end of the World War II.

Squadron Leader Charles Robert Davidson MC was a Scottish World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories.

Major Victor Henry Huston was a World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories. He was the only ace in his squadron.

Flight Lieutenant William Geoffrey Meggitt was a British World War I flying ace credited with six aerial victories.

Squadron Leader William Miller, was a British flying ace of the First World War, who was credited with six aerial victories. Miller worked in the Royal Air Force Educational Service between the World Wars. He returned to service for the Second World War, rising to the rank of Squadron Leader.

Flight Lieutenant Frank Gerald Craven Weare was a British World War I flying ace credited with fifteen aerial victories in forty days.

Flight Lieutenant Robert Leslie Chidlaw-Roberts was a British World War I flying ace credited with ten aerial victories. During his aerial combat career, and in different dogfights, he engaged two famous German aces; he was one of the British pilots who downed Werner Voss, and on 9 January 1918, he shot down and killed Max Ritter von Muller.

Air Vice Marshal Colin Peter Brown & Bar was a Scottish officer who began his career in the Royal Naval Air Service during the First World War, before transferring to the Royal Air Force (RAF). A flying ace credited with 14 aerial victories, he remained in the RAF and served throughout the Second World War, retiring in 1954.

Group Captain Charles Findlay DFC AFC (1891–1971) was a Scottish military officer. In World War I, he was a flying ace credited with fourteen aerial victories. He made the Royal Air Force his career, and served throughout World War II.

Major Wilfred Ernest Young was an English World War I flying ace credited with 11 confirmed aerial victories.

Wing Commander Douglas Arthur Davies was an officer of the British Royal Air Force, who was credited with 10 aerial victories in World War I, and also served during World War II.

Wing Commander William Hastings Farrow was a British World War I flying ace credited with 10 aerial victories. He would pursue a military career well into the 1920s before resigning in 1926. Like many World War I aces, he returned to the military for World War II, and was honoured by induction into the Order of the British Empire.

Flight Lieutenant Arthur Clunie Randall was a Scottish World War I flying ace credited with 10 aerial victories. After earning a Distinguished Flying Cross during the war, he remained in military service until 1926.

Captain Harold Ross Eycott-Martin began and ended his military career in the Royal Engineers. While seconded for duty with the Royal Air Force, he would win a Military Cross in the well-known air action in Italy in which Alan Jerrard won his Victoria Cross. Eycott-Martin would end the war as a flying ace credited with eight aerial victories. In the aftermath of the war, he would fall into disgrace. After being declared bankrupt, he would desert the Engineers and be ejected from the army.