Charles Bennet, 1st Earl of Tankerville

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Charles Bennet, 1st Earl of Tankerville KT PC (1674 – 21 May 1722), known as The Lord Ossulston between 1695 and 1714, was a British peer.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Contents

Background

Tankerville was the son of John Bennet, 1st Baron Ossulston.

John Bennet, 1st Baron Ossulston was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1663 to 1679. He was created Baron Ossulston in 1682. Ossulston is the name of a hundred of the ceremonial county of Middlesex.

Political career

Tankerville succeeded his father in the barony in 1695 and was able to take a seat in the House of Lords. In 1714 he was created Earl of Tankerville, [1] a revival of the title which had become extinct on the death of his father-in-law thirteen years earlier (see below). He was sworn of the Privy Council in 1716 [2] and made a Knight of the Thistle in 1721. [3]

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted respectively ruled by appointment, heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Order of the Thistle order of chivalry associated with Scotland

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry associated with Scotland. The current version of the Order was founded in 1687 by King James VII of Scotland who asserted that he was reviving an earlier Order. The Order consists of the Sovereign and sixteen Knights and Ladies, as well as certain "extra" knights. The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; he or she is not advised by the Government, as occurs with most other Orders.

Family

Lord Tankerville married Lady Mary, daughter of Ford Grey, 1st Earl of Tankerville, in 1695. He died in May 1722 and was succeeded in his titles by his son, Charles. [4]

Ford Grey, 1st Earl of Tankerville English nobleman and statesman

Ford Grey, 1st Earl of Tankerville, 1st Viscount Glendale, and 3rd Baron Grey of Werke, was an English nobleman and statesman.

Charles Bennet, 2nd Earl of Tankerville KT, styled Lord Ossulston between 1714 and 1722, was a British peer and politician.

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References

Legal offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Abingdon
Justice in Eyre
South of the Trent

1715–1722
Succeeded by
The Lord Cornwallis
Peerage of England
Preceded by
John Bennet
Baron Ossulston
16951722
Succeeded by
Charles Bennet
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
New creation
Earl of Tankerville
17161722
Succeeded by
Charles Bennet