Charles C. Wilson (actor)

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Charles C. Wilson
Charles Wilson actor.jpg
Charles C. Wilson in It Happened One Night (1934)
Born
Charles Cahill Wilson

(1894-07-29)July 29, 1894
DiedJanuary 7, 1948(1948-01-07) (aged 53)
Years active1918–1948

Charles Cahill Wilson (July 29, 1894 January 7, 1948) was an American character actor whose career began in the silent film era and extended into the late 1940s.

Contents

Biography

Born in New York City in 1894, the white-haired, burly actor was often typecast as an earnest police officer, newspaper editor or principal. He appeared in over 250 films between 1928 and 1948, mostly playing small supporting roles with a few sentences. Charles Wilson began his acting career at the theatre, including roles in six Broadway plays between 1918 and 1931. [1] In 1928, he directed the Hollywood comedy Lucky Boy (1928), where he also made his film debut. According to the Internet Movie Database, Lucky Boy was Wilson's only film as a director.

Broadway theatre class of professional theater presented in New York City, New York, USA

Broadway theatre, also known simply as Broadway, refers to the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats located in the Theater District and Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Along with London's West End theatre, Broadway theatre is widely considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world.

His most notable role was probably Clark Gable's "wonderfully aggravated" [2] newspaper boss in Frank Capra's comedy It Happened One Night , which won five Academy Awards in 1935. He was also cast in small roles in other Capra movies such as Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946). Shortly before his death, Wilson appeared as the boss of the Three Stooges in the two-reel comedy Crime on Their Hands (1948).

Clark Gable American actor

William Clark Gable was an American film actor who is often referred to as "The King of Hollywood". He began his career as an extra in Hollywood silent films between 1924 and 1926, and progressed to supporting roles with a few films for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1930. He landed his first leading role in 1931 and was a leading man in more than 60 motion pictures over the following three decades.

Frank Capra Sicilian-born American film director

Frank Russell Capra was an Italian-American film director, producer and writer who became the creative force behind some of the major award-winning films of the 1930s and 1940s. Born in Italy and raised in Los Angeles from the age of five, his rags-to-riches story has led film historians such as Ian Freer to consider him the "American Dream personified."

<i>It Happened One Night</i> 1934 film by Frank Capra

It Happened One Night is a 1934 pre-Code American romantic comedy film with elements of screwball comedy directed and co-produced by Frank Capra, in collaboration with Harry Cohn, in which a pampered socialite tries to get out from under her father's thumb and falls in love with a roguish reporter. The plot is based on the August 1933 short story "Night Bus" by Samuel Hopkins Adams, which provided the shooting title. Classified as a "pre-Code" production, the film is among the last romantic comedies created before the MPPDA began rigidly enforcing the 1930 Motion Picture Production Code in July 1934. It Happened One Night was released just four months prior to that enforcement.

He died at the age of 53 of esophageal varices.

Selected filmography

<i>Lucky Boy</i> 1929 film by Norman Taurog

Lucky Boy is a 1929 American musical drama film directed by Norman Taurog and Charles C. Wilson and starring George Jessel. The film was mainly a silent film with synchronized music and sound effects, as well as some talking sequences. The film's plot bore strong similarities to that of the hit 1927 film The Jazz Singer, which had originally been intended to star Jessel before Al Jolson took over the role.

<i>Acquitted</i> (1929 film) 1929 film directed by Frank R. Strayer

Acquitted is a 1929 American melodrama directed by Frank R. Strayer, from a screenplay by Keene Thompson. The film stars Lloyd Hughes, Margaret Livingston, and Sam Hardy, and was released by Columbia Pictures on November 15, 1929.

<i>Broadway Scandals</i> 1929 film by George Archainbaud

Broadway Scandals is a 1929 American Pre-Code musical film.

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References

  1. Charles C. Wilson at the Internet Broadway Database
  2. Michał Oleszczyk (November 12, 2013). "Looking Back at "It Happened One Night"". rogerebert.com.
  3. Great Movie Musicals on DVD - A Classic Movie Fan's Guide by John Howard Reid - Google search with book preview