Charles Cheyne, 1st Viscount Newhaven

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Charles Cheyne, 1st Viscount Newhaven (23 October 1625 30 June 1698) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1660 and 1698.

House of Commons of England parliament of England up to 1707

The House of Commons of England was the lower house of the Parliament of England from its development in the 14th century to the union of England and Scotland in 1707, when it was replaced by the House of Commons of Great Britain. In 1801, with the union of Great Britain and Ireland, that house was in turn replaced by the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

Contents

Life

Cheyne was the son of Francis Cheyne of Chesham Bois and his wife Anne Fleetwood, daughter of Sir William Fleetwood of Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire. [1] He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford on 29 January 1640, aged 14 and was of Lincoln's Inn in 1642, (as Cheney). [2] He inherited Cogenho, Northamptonshire in 1644 and purchased the manor of Chelsea and its main house, Chelsea Place, with the dowry of his wife, Lady Jane Cavendish, 1657. He paid for the house in installments beginning in 1657 with £1,900 and made the final payment for whole estate in 1661 at a total cost of £13,626. [3]

Lincolns Inn one of the four Inns of Court in London, England

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of the four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. Lincoln's Inn is recognised to be one of the world's most prestigious professional bodies of judges and lawyers.

In 1660, Cheyne was elected Member of Parliament for Amersham in the Convention Parliament. [1] He was elected MP for Great Marlow in March 1669 to the Cavalier Parliament and sat until 1679. [1] He was created Viscount Newhaven (in Scotland) on 17 May 1681. In 1690 he was elected MP for Harwich [1] and Newport (Cornwall) [1] and chose to sit for Harwich until 1695. In 1695 he was elected MP for Newport and sat until his death.

Amersham, often spelt as Agmondesham, was a constituency of the House of Commons of England until 1707, then in the House of Commons of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and finally in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs), elected by the bloc-vote system.

Convention Parliament (1660)

The Convention Parliament followed the Long Parliament that had finally voted for its own dissolution on 16 March that year. Elected as a "free parliament", i.e. with no oath of allegiance to the Commonwealth or to the monarchy, it was predominantly Royalist in its membership. It assembled for the first time on 25 April 1660.

Great Marlow, sometimes simply called Marlow, was a parliamentary borough in Buckinghamshire. It elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons between 1301 and 1307, and again from 1624 until 1868, and then one member from 1868 until 1885, when the borough was abolished.

Cheyne died at the age of 72 and was buried at Chelsea Old Church on 13 July 1698, [1] where a monument on the north wall commemorated him and his wife Lady Jane Cheyne who was a considerable benefactress of the building. [4]

Chelsea Old Church Church in London

The Chelsea Old Church, also known as All Saints, is an Anglican church, on Old Church Street, Chelsea, London SW3, England, near Albert Bridge. It is the church for a parish in the Diocese of London, part of the Church of England.

Family

Cheyne married Lady Jane Cavendish, daughter of the first Duke of Newcastle and had a son, William Cheyne, who became 2nd Viscount Newhaven, and two daughters, Elizabeth and Catharine. [5] His second wife was Isabella, Countess of Radnor widow of Johh Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor, and daughter of Sir John Smyth of Bidborough, Kent. [1]

Jane Cavendish British poet and playwright

Lady Jane Cavendish (1621–1669) was a noted poet and playwright. She was daughter of William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle, and later the wife of Charles Cheyne, Viscount Newhaven, Along with her literary achievements, Jane helped manage her father's properties while he spent the English Civil War in exile; she was responsible for a variety of military correspondences and for salvaging many of her family's valuable possessions. Later in life, Jane became an important community member in Chelsea. She used her money and resources to make improvements on Chelsea Church and to otherwise benefit her friends and neighbours. Marked by vitality, integrity, perseverance, and creativity, Jane's life and works tell the story of a Royalist woman's indomitable spirit during the English Civil War and Restoration in England.

William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle 17th-century English polymath and aristocrat

William Cavendish, 1st Duke of Newcastle upon Tyne KG KB PC was an English polymath and aristocrat, having been a poet, equestrian, playwright, swordsman, politician, architect, diplomat and soldier. He was born into the wealthy Cavendish family at Handsworth in the West Riding of Yorkshire; it had a good relationship with the ruling Stuart monarchy and began to gain prominence after he was invested as a Knight of the Bath, and then inherited his father's Northern England estates.

William Cheyne, 2nd Viscount Newhaven was an English Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1681 until 1707 when as a viscount in the Peerage of Scotland he was required to sit in the House of Lords.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 History of Parliament Online - Cheyne, Charles
  2. 'Alumni Oxonienses, 1500-1714: Chaffey-Chivers', Alumni Oxonienses 1500-1714: Abannan-Kyte (1891), pp. 255-273. Date accessed: 6 April 2011
  3. 'Landownership: Chelsea manor', A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 12: Chelsea (2004), pp. 108-115. Date accessed: 6 April 2011
  4. 'Religious history: The parish church', A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 12: Chelsea (2004), pp. 238-250. Date accessed: 6 April 2011
  5. Henderson, Thomas Finlayson (1887). "Cheyne, Charles"  . In Stephen, Leslie (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography . 10. London: Smith, Elder & Co.