Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore

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Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore (1700-1785). (Joshua Reynolds) Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore (1700-1785) by Joshua Reynolds.jpg
Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore (1700–1785). (Joshua Reynolds)

Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore, KT (27 August 1700 – 5 July 1785), known as Lord Milsington to 1730, of Portmore House, Weybridge, Surrey, was a British Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1726 and 1730, when he succeeded to the peerage as Earl of Portmore. He subsequently became a Scottish representative peer in the House of Lords. He was a racehorse owner and was known as Beau Colyear for his conspicuous dress.

Order of the Thistle order of chivalry associated with Scotland

The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry associated with Scotland. The current version of the Order was founded in 1687 by King James VII of Scotland who asserted that he was reviving an earlier Order. The Order consists of the Sovereign and sixteen Knights and Ladies, as well as certain "extra" knights. The Sovereign alone grants membership of the Order; he or she is not advised by the Government, as occurs with most other Orders.

Earl of Portmore

Earl of Portmore was a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1703 for the Scottish military commander David Colyear, 1st Lord Portmore. He had already been created Lord Portmore in 1699 and was made Lord Colyear and Viscount of Milsington at the same time as he was granted the earldom, also in the Peerage of Scotland. He was the son of Alexander Colyear, who had been created a Baronet, of Holland, in the Baronetage of England on 20 February 1677. Lord Portmore married Catherine Sedley, Countess of Dorchester, a former mistress of James II. He was succeeded by his only surviving son, the second Earl. He represented Wycombe and Andover in Parliament. His grandson, the fourth Earl, sat as Member of Parliament for Boston. The fourth Earl died without surviving male issue in 1835 when the titles became extinct.

House of Lords upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

Contents

Early life

Colyear was thee son of David Colyear, 1st Earl of Portmore and his wife Catherine Sedley, daughter of Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet, MP, of Aylesford, Kent, and former mistress of James II. [1] His mother was the owner of Portmore House, Weybridge, which became the seat of the Earls of Portmore. [2] [3] In 1719, he was page to the Princess of Wales. [1]

David Colyear, 1st Earl of Portmore British politician

General David Colyear, 1st Earl of Portmore was a Scottish general and Governor of Gibraltar.

Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet 17th-century English noble, dramatist, and politician

Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet, was an English noble, dramatist and politician. He was principally remembered for his wit and profligacy.

James II of England 17th-century King of England and Ireland, and of Scotland (as James VII)

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The last Roman Catholic monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, his reign is now remembered primarily for struggles over religious tolerance. However, it also involved the principles of absolutism and divine right of kings and his deposition ended a century of political and civil strife by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown.

Career

Milsington was returned as Member of Parliament for Wycombe on the Wharton interest at a by-election on 1 February 1726 but on account of the partiality of the returning officer, the election was declared void on 22 February. At the subsequent rerun of the by-election on 3 March he was again returned as MP through the partiality of the returning officer, but was unseated on petition on 17 March. At the 1727 British general election he was returned as MP Andover in a contest. He voted with the Administration on the civil list arrears in 1729. [1]

Wycombe (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1868 onwards

Wycombe is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Steve Baker, a Conservative.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

Andover was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England from 1295 to 1307, and again from 1586, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was a parliamentary borough in Hampshire, represented by two Members of Parliament until 1868, and by one member from 1868 to 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP from 1885 until 1918.

On 2 January 1730 Milsington succeeded to the peerage on the death of his father and vacated his seat in the House of Commons. In February 1732, he was sent as envoy to Don Carlos, when he took possession of Parma and Piacenza. He was knighted on 2 June 1732 and married on 7 October 1732 Juliana Hele, daughter of Roger Hele of Halwell, Devon, and widow of Peregrine Osborne, 3rd Duke of Leeds. From 1734 to 1737 he was a Scottish representative peer in the House of Lords. [1]

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

Juliana Hele was an English noblewoman. She was the third wife of Peregrine Osborne, 3rd Duke of Leeds, and later the wife of Charles Colyear, 2nd Earl of Portmore, and mother of the 3rd Earl.

Peregrine Osborne, 3rd Duke of Leeds British peer

Peregrine Hyde Osborne, 3rd Duke of Leeds was a British peer.

Society

Portmore was a leading racehorse owner and owned among others, Crab and Squirt. He became well-known in high society for the splendour of his dress and equipages. He was a founding Governor of the Foundling Hospital, a charity created in 1739, dedicated to the salvation of abandoned children.

Crab also known as Old Crab and Mr. Panton's Crab was a British Thoroughbred racehorse. After retiring from racing he became a successful stallion and was British Champion sire in 1748, 1749 and 1750. He was owned by the 1st Earl of Portmore until purchased by Mr. Cotton and then Thomas Panton.

Squirt was a Thoroughbred racehorse, best known as the grandsire of Eclipse, founder of the breed's dominant sire line. He lived at a time when the Thoroughbred breed was in its infancy, before even the foundation of the Jockey Club and General Stud Book. Thus information is incomplete.

Foundling Hospital hospital

The Foundling Hospital in London, England, was founded in 1739 by the philanthropic sea captain Thomas Coram. It was a children's home established for the "education and maintenance of exposed and deserted young children." The word "hospital" was used in a more general sense than it is today, simply indicating the institution's "hospitality" to those less fortunate. Nevertheless, one of the top priorities of the committee at the Foundling Hospital was children's health, as they combated smallpox, fevers, consumption, dysentery and even infections from everyday activities like teething that drove up mortality rates and risked epidemics. With their energies focused on maintaining a disinfected environment, providing simple clothing and fare, the committee paid less attention to and spent less on developing children's education. As a result, financial problems would hound the institution for years to come, despite the growing "fashionableness" of charities like the hospital.

Death and legacy

Portmore died on 5 July 1785. By his wife, he had the following children:

  1. Caroline Colyear (c.1733-1812), who married Nathaniel Curzon, 1st Baron Scarsdale, and had children [4]
  2. Juliana Colyear (1735-1821), who married Henry Dawkins in 1759, and had children
  3. David Colyear, Viscount Milsington (1736-1756), who died unmarried
  4. William Charles Colyear, 3rd Earl of Portmore (17451823)

He also had an illegitimate daughter by Elizabeth Collier, also called Elizabeth, born about 1747, who married first Colonel Edward Pole (1718–1780), the soldier, and secondly Erasmus Darwin, the physician.

Erasmus Darwin English physician, botanist; member of the Lunar Society

Erasmus Darwin was an English physician. One of the key thinkers of the Midlands Enlightenment, he was also a natural philosopher, physiologist, slave-trade abolitionist, inventor and poet.

Arms

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Colyear, Charles, Visct. Milsington (1700–85), of Weybridge, Surr., History of Parliament Online" . Retrieved 10 June 2016.
  2. "'Parishes: Weybridge', in A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 3, ed. H E Malden (London, 1911), pp. 475-480". British History Online. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  3. Amongst his ancestors were William Parker, 4th Baron Monteagle, foiler of the gunpowder plot, and Geoffrey Chaucer. He was also a descendant of Elizabeth of York, daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and sister of Edward IV of England.
  4. Mosley, Charles, editor. Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes. Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke's Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003. Volume 3, page 3539.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Charles Egerton
The Lord Shelburne
Member of Parliament for Wycombe
1726
With: The Lord Shelburne
Succeeded by
The Lord Shelburne
Harry Waller
Preceded by
William Guidott
James Brudenell
Member of Parliament for Andover
17271730
With: James Brudenell
Succeeded by
James Brudenell
William Guidott
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
David Colyear
Earl of Portmore
17301785
Succeeded by
William Colyear

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