Charles Cornwallis, 1st Earl Cornwallis

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The Right Honourable

The Earl Cornwallis

PC
Lord-Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets and Constable of the Tower of London
In office
1740–1762
Monarch George II
George III
Preceded by Vacant
Succeeded by The Lord Berkeley of Stratton
Personal details
Born 29 March 1700
Died23 June 1762 (1762-06-24) (aged 62)
Nationality British
Spouse(s) Hon. Elizabeth Townshend (d. 1782)

Charles Cornwallis, 1st Earl Cornwallis PC (29 March 1700 23 June 1762), styled The Honourable Charles Cornwallis until 1722 and known as The Lord Cornwallis between 1722 and 1753, was a British peer.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom Formal body of advisers to the sovereign in the United Kingdom

Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, usually known simply as the Privy Council of the United Kingdom or just the Privy Council, is a formal body of advisers to the Sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians, who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords.

Contents

Background

Cornwallis was the son of Charles Cornwallis, 4th Baron Cornwallis, by Lady Charlotte, daughter of Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Arran. Edward Cornwallis and Frederick Cornwallis were his younger brothers. [1] He was admitted to Clare College, Cambridge in 1717. [2]

Charles Cornwallis, 4th Baron Cornwallis British politician

Charles Cornwallis, 4th Baron Cornwallis was a British politician.

Richard Butler, 1st Earl of Arran, Baron Butler of Cloughgrenan, Viscount Tullough was an Irish peer, the fourth son of James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde.

Edward Cornwallis 18th-century British Army general

Lieutenant General Edward Cornwallis was a British military officer who was a member of the aristocratic Cornwallis family. Cornwallis fought in Scotland, putting down the Jacobite rebellion of 1745 and then was given the task of establishing Halifax, Nova Scotia as the Governor of Nova Scotia (1749–1752). Cornwallis returned to London, where he was elected as MP for Westminster and married the niece of Robert Walpole, Great Britain's first Prime Minister. Cornwallis was then given the position of Governor of Gibraltar.

Career

Cornwallis succeeded his father in the barony in 1722. In 1740 he was sworn of the Privy Council and appointed Lord-Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets and Constable of the Tower of London, [3] posts he held until 1762. [1] In 1753 he was created Viscount Brome, in the County of Suffolk, and Earl Cornwallis. [4]

Family

Lord Cornwallis married the Honourable Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend, in 1722. They had seven children:

Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend British Whig statesman

Charles Townshend, 2nd Viscount Townshend, was an English Whig statesman. He served for a decade as Secretary of State for the Northern Department, 1714–1717, 1721–1730. He directed British foreign policy in close collaboration with his brother-in-law, prime minister Robert Walpole. He was often known as Turnip Townshend because of his strong interest in farming turnips and his role in the British Agricultural Revolution.

Samuel Whitbread (1720–1796) English brewer

Samuel Whitbread was an English brewer and Member of Parliament. In 1742, he established a brewery that in 1799 became Whitbread & Co Ltd.

Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis British general, colonial official, diplomat

Charles Cornwallis, 1st Marquess Cornwallis KG, PC, styled Viscount Brome between 1753 and 1762 and known as The Earl Cornwallis between 1762 and 1792, was a British Army general and official. In the United States and the United Kingdom he is best remembered as one of the leading British generals in the American War of Independence. His surrender in 1781 to a combined American and French force at the Siege of Yorktown ended significant hostilities in North America. He also served as a civil and military governor in Ireland and India; in both places he brought about significant changes, including the Act of Union in Ireland, and the Cornwallis Code and the Permanent Settlement in India.

James Cornwallis, 4th Earl Cornwallis British cleric and peer

James Cornwallis, 4th Earl Cornwallis was a British clergyman, and peer.

He died in June 1762, aged 62, and was succeeded by his eldest son, Charles, who became a prominent military commander and was created Marquess Cornwallis in 1792. The Countess Cornwallis died on 17 December 1785. [1]

He was the grandson of Charles Cornwallis, 3rd Baron Cornwallis; the great-grandson of Charles Cornwallis, 2nd Baron Cornwallis; and the great-great grandson of Frederick Cornwallis, 1st Baron Cornwallis.

He was the grandfather of Charles Cornwallis; the great-grandfather of James Mann; the 2nd great-grandfather of Fiennes Cornwallis; the 3rd great-grandfather of Fiennes Cornwallis, 1st Baron Cornwallis; the 4th great-grandfather of Wykeham Cornwallis, 2nd Baron Cornwallis; and the 5th great-grandfather of Fiennes Cornwallis, 3rd Baron Cornwallis.

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References

Legal offices
Preceded by
The Earl of Tankerville
Justice in Eyre
South of the Trent

1722–1740
Succeeded by
The Earl of Jersey
Honorary titles
Vacant
Title last held by
The Earl of Leicester
Lord-Lieutenant of the Tower Hamlets
1740 1762
Succeeded by
The Lord Berkeley of Stratton
Constable of the Tower of London
1740 1762
Peerage of Great Britain
New creation Earl Cornwallis
1753–1762
Succeeded by
Charles Cornwallis
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Charles Cornwallis
Baron Cornwallis
1722–1762
Succeeded by
Charles Cornwallis