Charles Duncan McPherson

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Col. Charles Duncan McPherson (April 11, 1877 [1] —1970 [2] ) was a soldier, journalist and politician from Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1910–14, and again from 1915-22. He was a Liberal, and served as a cabinet minister in the government of Tobias Norris.

Manitoba Province of Canada

Manitoba is a province at the longitudinal centre of Canada. It is often considered one of the three prairie provinces and is Canada's fifth-most populous province with its estimated 1.3 million people. Manitoba covers 649,950 square kilometres (250,900 sq mi) with a widely varied landscape, stretching from the northern oceanic coastline to the southern border with the United States. The province is bordered by the provinces of Ontario to the east and Saskatchewan to the west, the territories of Nunavut to the north, and Northwest Territories to the northwest, and the U.S. states of North Dakota and Minnesota to the south.

Legislative Assembly of Manitoba form the Legislature of Manitoba, Canada

The Legislative Assembly of Manitoba is the deliberative assembly of the Manitoba Legislature in the Canadian province of Manitoba. Fifty-seven members are elected to this assembly at provincial general elections, all in single-member constituencies with first-past-the-post voting. Bills passed by the Legislative Assembly are given royal assent by the Queen of Canada in Right of Manitoba, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Manitoba. The Manitoba Legislative Building is located in central Winnipeg, at the meeting point of the Wolseley and Fort Rouge constituencies.

Manitoba Liberal Party centrist political party in Manitoba, Canada

The Manitoba Liberal Party is a political party in Manitoba, Canada. Its roots can be traced to the late nineteenth-century, following the province's creation in 1870.

McPherson was born in Forest, Ontario, the son of Dougald McPherson, and was educated in the neighbouring area. He began work as an apprentice with the Forest Free Press in 1893. He moved to Portage la Prairie, Manitoba in 1896 and worked as a printer and later foreman there, in Neepawa and in Fort William, Ontario. From 1889 to 1901, he was manager and editor for the Weekly Manitoba Liberal in Portage la Prairie. In 1901, McPherson bought that paper and then, in 1903, the Daily Graphic, merging the two. In 1905, he established the Fort William Herald with R.G. McCuish. He became editor of the Winnipeg Western Editor in 1911. [1] He served as president of the Western Canada Press Association in 1906-07, [2] and was secretary of the Lakeside Liberal Association from 1902 to 1910. He also became secretary of the Portage St. Andrew Society in 1909.[ citation needed ]

Forest, Ontario community in Lambton Shores, Ontario

Forest is a community in Lambton Shores, Ontario near Sarnia and Lake Huron in Lambton County. It has a population of 2,876 and a land area of 5.26 km2.

Fort William, Ontario former city in Ontario, Canada, amalgamated with Port Arthur to form Thunder Bay in 1970

Fort William was a city in Northern Ontario, located on the Kaministiquia River, at its entrance to Lake Superior. It amalgamated with Port Arthur and the townships of Neebing and McIntyre to form the city of Thunder Bay in January 1970. Since then it has been the largest city in Northwestern Ontario. The city's Latin motto was A posse ad esse featured on its coat of arms designed in 1900 by town officials, "On one side of the shield stands an Indian dressed in the paint and feathers of the early days; on the other side is a French voyageur; the center contains an [grain] elevator, a steamship and a locomotive, while the beaver surmounts the whole."

He served as lieutenant and captain in the 12th Manitoba Dragoons from 1904 to 1908, and later as Major of the 18th Mounted Rifles from 1908 until 1913, when he was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel. [1]

McPherson was first elected to the Manitoba legislature in the 1910 provincial election, defeating Conservative incumbent Edwin D. Lynch by 68 votes in the Lakeside constituency. [3] Manitoba was governed by Rodmond Roblin's Conservative Party in this period, and McPherson served as an opposition member for the next four years. In the 1914 election, he lost to Conservative candidate John J. Garland [3] by ten votes.[ citation needed ]

The 1910 Manitoba general election was held on July 11, 1910 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Manitoba, Canada.

The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba is a centre-right political party in Manitoba, Canada. It is currently the governing party in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, after winning a substantial majority in the 2016 election and maintaining a majority in the 2019 election.

Edwin D. Lynch was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1903 to 1910, as a member of the Conservative Party.

Early in 1915, the Roblin government was forced to resign from office amid a corruption scandal. [4] The Liberals won a landslide majority in the 1915 provincial election. McPherson was returned for the Lakeside constituency, defeating Garland [3] by 163 votes. He did not serve in the legislature at its convening, however, having been previously called to active service in World War I.[ citation needed ]

The 1915 Manitoba general election was held August 6, 1915 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Manitoba, Canada.

World War I 1914–1918 global war starting in Europe

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the resulting 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.

McPherson travelled with the first Canadian contingent to England at the start of the war, but was called home again to take second command of the 32nd Battalion. Promoted to the officer class at Shornecliffe, he was the first Canadian officer to tour the western front before Canadian soldiers were sent into the area. He served in France for twenty months as second-in-command of the 28th Battalion. He received command of the 31st Alberta Battalion in 1917, and led this battalion at the Battle of Passchendale. McPherson was twice decorated for his war service.[ citation needed ] He returned to Manitoba after the war to take his seat in the legislature, and served as a backbench supporter of Tobias Norris's government.[ citation needed ]

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

France Republic in Europe with several non-European regions

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.02 million. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Alberta Province of Canada

Alberta is a province of Canada. With an estimated population of 4,067,175 as of 2016 census, it is Canada's fourth most populous province and the most populous of Canada's three prairie provinces. Its area is about 660,000 square kilometres (250,000 sq mi). Alberta and its neighbour Saskatchewan were districts of the Northwest Territories until they were established as provinces on September 1, 1905. The premier is Jason Kenney as of April 30, 2019.

The Liberals were reduced to a minority government in the 1920 provincial election. McPherson was re-elected in Lakeside, defeating Conservative E. Herbert Muir by 23 votes. On January 20, 1921, he was appointed to Norris's cabinet as Minister of Public Works. [3]

During this period of Canadian history, newly appointed ministers were required to resign their seats and seek the renewed consent of their electorate to assume office. The resulting by-elections were often formalities, as many ministers were unopposed following their appointments. McPherson, however, was forced to contest another challenge from Muir, who was now campaigning as a Farmer's candidate. McPherson won by 156 votes, and continued to serve in cabinet. [3]

In the 1922 provincial election, McPherson left the Lakeside constituency to challenge Conservative party leader Fawcett Taylor in Portage la Prairie. Taylor won the challenge in a close contest, [3] defeating McPherson by 129 votes. The Liberals were defeated provincially by the United Farmers of Manitoba, and McPherson resigned from cabinet with the rest of the Norris ministry on August 8, 1922. [3]

Last years/death

He moved to Vancouver, British Columbia in April 1946. McPherson died there in 1970. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Canadian Press Association (1911). "Who's who in western Canada". p. 279. Retrieved 2012-11-30.
  2. 1 2 3 "Charles Duncan McPherson (1877-1970)". Memorable Manitobans. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-11-30.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "MLA Biographies - Deceased". Legislative Assembly of Manitoba. Archived from the original on 2014-03-30.
  4. "Legislature Scandal". TimeLinks. Manitoba Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-11-29.