Charles Howard, 2nd Earl of Berkshire

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Charles Howard, 2nd Earl of Berkshire KB (1615 – April 1679) was an English peer, styled Viscount Andover from 1626 to 1669, the son of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire and his wife Lady Elizabeth Cecil.

Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1605 and 1622. He was created Earl of Berkshire in 1626.

Howard was created a Knight of the Bath in 1626. He was elected the MP for Oxford in 1640, but was never seated as he was given a writ of acceleration to the House of Lords before the beginning of the session. He was a Royalist sergeant-major of horse in 1643, and a Gentleman of the Bedchamber to Charles II in exile, from 1658 to 1660. He succeeded his father as Earl of Berkshire in 1669.

Oxford was a parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom. It comprised the city of Oxford in the county of Oxfordshire, and elected two members of parliament from its creation in 1295 until 1885 when its representation was reduced to one member by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885.

Writ of acceleration

A writ in acceleration, commonly called a writ of acceleration, was a type of writ of summons that enabled the eldest son and heir apparent of a peer with multiple peerage titles to attend the British or Irish House of Lords, using one of his father's subsidiary titles. This procedure could be used to lower the average age of the house, and increase the number of capable members in a house that drew on a very small pool of talent, without increasing the effective size of the peerage and thereby diluting the exclusivity of noble titles.

House of Lords Upper house in the Parliament of the United Kingdom

The House of Lords, also known as the House of Peers and domestically usually referred to simply as the Lords, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Membership is granted by appointment or else by heredity or official function. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

As an influential member of the Catholic nobility, and a staunch supporter of the Duke of York, he was, like his cousin William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford (who was executed for treason in 1680), an obvious target of Titus Oates and other informers during the Popish Plot. More wary of the danger he was in than Stafford, he fled abroad in November 1678 before any accusation of treason was made against him, and died in Paris the following April. No credible evidence of treason was ever produced against him: a number of supposedly incriminating letters which he wrote in 1674 merely confirmed his political support for the future James II, who he promised to stand by "in the dark hour of his fortune", and an alleged deathbed confession to a treasonable conspiracy turned out to be a forgery.

James II of England King of England, Scotland and Ireland

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II and King of Scotland as James VII, from 6 February 1685 until he was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. The last Roman Catholic monarch of England, Scotland and Ireland, his reign is now remembered primarily for struggles over religious tolerance. However, it also involved the principles of absolutism and divine right of kings and his deposition ended a century of political and civil strife by confirming the primacy of Parliament over the Crown.

William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford English Royalist and Catholic martyr

William Howard, 1st Viscount Stafford, FRS was the youngest son of Thomas Howard, 21st Earl of Arundel, and his wife, the former Alethea Talbot. A Fellow of the Royal Society from 1665, he was a Royalist supporter before being falsely implicated by Titus Oates in the later discredited "Popish Plot", and executed for treason. He was beatified as a Catholic martyr by Pope Pius in 1929

Titus Oates English perjurer

Titus Oates, also called Titus the Liar, was an English perjurer who fabricated the "Popish Plot", a supposed Catholic conspiracy to kill King Charles II.

Berkshire's wife Dorothy (left), painted ca. 1637 by Anthony van Dyck. Anthonis van Dyck 014.jpg
Berkshire's wife Dorothy (left), painted ca. 1637 by Anthony van Dyck.

On 10 April 1637, he married Hon. Dorothy Savage, daughter of Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage and Elizabeth Savage, Countess Rivers. They had three sons who all died young, and one daughter, Anne (c. 1650 – 19 September 1682) who married in 1666 to Henry Bedingfield, but died childless. [2] With no male issue, he was succeeded by his brother Thomas in 1679.

Thomas Savage, 1st Viscount Savage, known as Sir Thomas Savage, 2nd Baronet from 1615 to 1626, was an English peer and courtier in the court of Charles I.

Elizabeth Savage, Countess Rivers and Viscountess Savage was an English courtier and a Royalist victim of uprisings during the English Civil War.

Thomas Howard, 3rd Earl of Berkshire was an English peer, styled Hon. Thomas Howard until 1679. He was the second son of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire.

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References

  1. "Lady Elizabeth Thimbelby and her Sister". The National Gallery.
  2. George Edward Cokayne, editor, The Complete Baronetage, 5 volumes (c. 1900); reprint, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 1983), volume III, page 152.
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Thomas Howard
Earl of Berkshire
1669–1679
Succeeded by
Thomas Howard
Baron Howard of Charlton
(writ in acceleration)

1640–1679