Charles John Ferguson

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Charles John Ferguson
Born1840
Carlisle, Cumbria
Died1 December 1904
NationalityEnglish
OccupationArchitect

Charles John Ferguson (usually known as C. J. Ferguson) (1840 – 1 December 1904) was an English architect who practised mainly in Carlisle, Cumbria. He was the younger son of Joseph Ferguson of Carlisle, and was articled to the architect and surveyor John A. Cory. [1] [lower-alpha 1] He spent some years in partnership with Cory, but most of his career was in single-handed practice. [3] From about 1902 he also had an office in London. [4]

The interior of St Michael and All Angels church, Isel Isel church interior.jpg
The interior of St Michael and All Angels church, Isel

Ferguson's output included new churches, restoration of existing churches, and work on country houses and public buildings. The architectural styles he used were mainly Gothic and Norman Revival. [3] Almost all his works are in what is now Cumbria, with a few isolated commissions elsewhere. The latter were obtained through personal contacts, for example his work for William Armstrong at Bamburgh Castle, Northumberland, [5] and for J. J. Bibby of the Bibby Line in Shropshire. [6] In the Buildings of England series Ferguson is described as being "a resourceful as well as a sensitive architect". [7]

See also

Notes and references

Notes

  1. John A. Cory had offices in Carlisle and Durham, and was county surveyor of Cumberland between 1862 and 1868 before he joined in partnership with Ferguson. [2]

Citations

  1. Curwen (1932), pp. 381–383
  2. Historic England, "Church of The Holy Trinity, Chapel Stile (1245198)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 25 September 2012
  3. 1 2 Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 62–63
  4. Charles John Ferguson, Dictionary of Scottish Architects, retrieved 23 September 2012
  5. Historic England, "Bamburgh Castle (1280155)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 25 September 2012
  6. Newman & Pevsner (2006), pp. 217–218
  7. Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 126

Sources

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