Charles Léon

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Charles, Count Léon (1806–1881) was an illegitimate son of Emperor Napoleon I of France and Louise Catherine Eléonore Denuelle de la Plaigne (1787–1868). He was the half brother of Alexandre Colonna-Walewski and Napoleon's legitimate son, Napoleon II, Duke of Reichstadt.

Alexandre Colonna-Walewski French politician

Alexandre Florian Joseph, Count Colonna-Walewski, was a Polish and French politician and diplomat.

Charles, Count Leon Charles, comte Leon.jpg
Charles, Count Léon

Léon’s daughter, Charlotte Mesnard who was interviewed in 1921 at the age of 55 said her son had a striking resemblance to Napoleon but had been killed in World War I near Reims. According to the article, She also said that her three much younger half brothers were killed in the war as well. [1]

Reims Subprefecture and commune in Grand Est, France

Reims, a city in the Grand Est region of France, lies 129 km (80 mi) east-northeast of Paris. The 2013 census recorded 182,592 inhabitants in the city of Reims proper, and 317,611 inhabitants in the metropolitan area. Its primary river, the Vesle, is a tributary of the Aisne.

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References

  1. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1921/04/23/109803978.pdf