Charles Marowitz

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Charles Marowitz (26 January 1934 2 May 2014) [1] was an American critic, theatre director, and playwright, regular columnist on Swans Commentary. [2] He collaborated with Peter Brook at the Royal Shakespeare Company, and later founded and directed The Open Space Theatre in London. [3]

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He is also the co-founder of Encore magazine which was published between 1954 and 1965, and co-editor of The Encore Reader: A Chronicle of the New Drama (1965). He was a regular contributor to publications such as The New York Times , The Times (London), TheaterWeek , and American Theatre and was the lead critic on the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner until it ceased publication.

He was the author of Murdering Marlowe, which imagines a rivalry between William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, which was selected as a finalist for the GLAAD Media Awards of 2002, and of the 1987 Broadway play Sherlock's Last Case with Frank Langella in the lead role. [4]

His free adaptations of Shakespeare have been collected in The Marowitz Shakespeare. He died of complications from Parkinson's disease in 2014 at the age of 80. [5]

Selected bibliography

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